Find Your Course
Liverpool Hope Logo

Sustainability

Introduction

During the 2016-2017 academic year, Liverpool Hope University consumed over 5.7 million kWh of electricity and over 10.7 million kWh of natural gas, at a cost of over £1.1 million. The planned development of the campus and the ever increasing price of fuel means this cost will rise year on year.  The University is determined to reduce the kWh consumed, and therefore the cost, through maximising the efficiency with which the utility is used, the use of low carbon technologies and by behaviour change. 

Energy Consumption

Electricity consumption for Liverpool Hope University, compared to last year:

Comparison between electricity consumption in 2014-2015 and 2015-2016

Gas Consumption

Gas consumption for Liverpool Hope University, compared to last year:

Comparison of gas consumption between 2014-2015 and 2015-2016

Carbon Reduction Commitment

The University is part of the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) Energy Efficiency Scheme. The CRC is a mandatory UK scheme aimed at improving energy efficiency and cutting carbon emissions in large organisations. The University qualified for Phase 2 of the Scheme (between 2014 and 2019) by consuming over 6,000 MWh electricity between April 2012 and March 2013 (we used 6031 MWh). As a qualifying organisation we have to monitor our energy use (both gas and electricity consumption), provide a report each year and to purchase allowances equal to the tonnes of carbon released. During 2016-2017 the University consumed 4,527 tonnes of carbon, at a cost of nearly £80,000.

What can I do?

  • You can make a difference! 
    • Myth - one person can not make a difference.  WRONG!
    • Any actions you take will make a difference, especially when multiplied across our community
  • Switch off all lights and appliances that are not needed and at the end of the day – why not have a nominated person and checklist to ensure that all non-essential appliances are switched off, and unplugged if necessary
    • Myth – it takes more energy to turn lights on and off than to leave them on.  WRONG! 
      • Lights should always be switched off when leaving the room
    • Myth – It’s not worth turning things off at the plug.  WRONG!
      • Vampire power still sucks power when devices are on standby, appliances could still use 6-8% power, so turn them off when not in use
    • Myth – Photocopiers should be left on, since switching then on and off all the time can damage them.  WRONG!
      • Switching photocopiers off causes no damage
  • Make the most of the daylight - open blinds and keep window ledges free of clutter
    • only turn on the lights that are required
    • could you use a desk lamp rather than turning on the lights for the whole office?
  • Only fill the kettle as much as you need – this saves energy (overfilling the kettle sees £68 million disappear in a cloud of steam each year in energy bills) and means you don’t have to wait as long for your drink. Visit United Utilities for more details
    • If your office has an automatic water boiler see if it can be turned off in the evenings and at weekends
  • Put a lid on your pan when cooking, it saves 90% of the energy required to cook your food and it saves times as well
  • Set your computers to energy saving mode if they are not used for a short while
    • Myth – Screensavers save energy.  WRONG!
      • They do not save energy, so when not in use switch off your monitor
    • Switch off your monitor – even if you are away from your desk for a couple of minutes
    • Tidy your inbox and files stored on your computer - keeping large quantities of data (such as multiple copies of the same document or old documents) increases the amount of energy needed in your server room
  • If temperatures are too high turn the heating down rather than open windows
    • Did you know: Every 1°C increase in temperature increase energy consumption by 8%!
  • Do not increase the thermostat to a high setting to heat the room faster (vice versa for air conditioning)
    • This is a myth – it does not make a difference, but can cost a lot.  People may forgot and leave the settings so the room may overheat and wastes energy.  If the windows are then opened to cool the room, then the warm air escapes and energy (and money) are wasted.
  • Dress appropriately for the season –your body temperature can increase by 3°C just by wearing a jumper
  • Ensure that central heating radiators are not blocked by furniture, wherever practically possible, to enable the heat to come into the room
  • Reduce the need for air-conditioning by:
    • Switch off equipment and lighting where possible to reduce heat gains
    • Close the doors and windows when the air conditioning is on
    • Shade your windows to prevent the sun’s rays from entering your office and prevent the air in your office from warming up
    • Open the windows instead
  • Report any lighting, heating or cooling problems on the Estates webpages and click ‘online requests’
    • Doors and windows that are not sealed correctly
    • Any heating and cooling that is running at the same time
  • Buy energy efficient products; all electrical products have an European energy label, which tells you how efficient the appliance is at using energy – A++ is the most efficient and G is the worst
  • Carry out a mini office Energy Audit to see how eco-efficient your office or department is

Initiatives

  • Solar Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the EDEN, Health Sciences building and at Plas Caerdeon
  • The EDEN Building has solar thermal heating
  • The University has a programme of LED lighting replacements
  • I HEART MY Campus Challenge is an awareness and engagement programme for both staff and students
    • Staff - the Challenge celebrates and recognises environmental achievements whilst also assisting and encouraging teams to further improve their environmental performance.
    • Students - an energy competition between halls of residence to see which hall can reduce its energy consumption compared to the previous year
  • The University is investing in a network of electricity and gas sub meters to monitor the electricity and gas consumption at a building level
    • The sub meters will be connected to the University’s online energy software allowing us to monitor trends in consumption and focus resources
    • This data will be published monthly for each building

Did you know?

  • The University has reduced its electricity consumption by 12% since 2005-2006
  • The University has reduced its gas consumption by 4% since 2005-2006
  • The University has a number of solar photovoltaic panels on site – on the EDEN and Health Sciences Buildings and at Plas Caerdeon; and has plans to increase the number of arrays on site
  • The University has 23 buildings over 250 m2 and all have a Display Energy Certificate rating of D or above.
    • Non-dwellings are responsible for almost 20% of the UK’s energy consumption and carbon emissions. Display Energy Certificates have to be displayed in all buildings over 250m2 occupied by a public authority.
    • DECs provide a building energy rating from A to G, where A is very efficient and G is the least efficient and are based on the actual amount of metered energy used by a building over the last 12 months. The usage of the building is compared to a benchmark that represents performance indicative of all buildings of this type, with a rating D being a typical building.
    • The DECs are used to raise awareness of energy use and to inform staff, students and visitors about the energy use of the building.
  • Check out the Carbon Trust’s website for other energy facts:

    • Office lights‌ left on overnight uses enough energy in a year to heat a home for almost five months

    • A 2°C increase in Office temperature creates enough carbon in a year to fill a hot air balloon

    • A computer left on overnight for a year creates enough carbon to fill a double decker bus

    • A Photocopier left on standby overnight wastes enough energy to make 30 cups of tea

 

Introduction

During the 2016-2017 academic year, Liverpool Hope University consumed over 5.7 million kWh of electricity and over 10.7 million kWh of natural gas, at a cost of over £1.1 million. The planned development of the campus and the ever increasing price of fuel means this cost will rise year on year.  The University is determined to reduce the kWh consumed, and therefore the cost, through maximising the efficiency with which the utility is used, the use of low carbon technologies and by behaviour change. 

Energy Consumption

Electricity consumption for Liverpool Hope University, compared to last year:

Comparison between electricity consumption in 2014-2015 and 2015-2016

Gas Consumption

Gas consumption for Liverpool Hope University, compared to last year:

Comparison of gas consumption between 2014-2015 and 2015-2016

Carbon Reduction Commitment

The University is part of the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) Energy Efficiency Scheme. The CRC is a mandatory UK scheme aimed at improving energy efficiency and cutting carbon emissions in large organisations. The University qualified for Phase 2 of the Scheme (between 2014 and 2019) by consuming over 6,000 MWh electricity between April 2012 and March 2013 (we used 6031 MWh). As a qualifying organisation we have to monitor our energy use (both gas and electricity consumption), provide a report each year and to purchase allowances equal to the tonnes of carbon released. During 2016-2017 the University consumed 4,527 tonnes of carbon, at a cost of nearly £80,000.

What can I do?

  • You can make a difference! 
    • Myth - one person can not make a difference.  WRONG!
    • Any actions you take will make a difference, especially when multiplied across our community
  • Switch off all lights and appliances that are not needed and at the end of the day – why not have a nominated person and checklist to ensure that all non-essential appliances are switched off, and unplugged if necessary
    • Myth – it takes more energy to turn lights on and off than to leave them on.  WRONG! 
      • Lights should always be switched off when leaving the room
    • Myth – It’s not worth turning things off at the plug.  WRONG!
      • Vampire power still sucks power when devices are on standby, appliances could still use 6-8% power, so turn them off when not in use
    • Myth – Photocopiers should be left on, since switching then on and off all the time can damage them.  WRONG!
      • Switching photocopiers off causes no damage
  • Make the most of the daylight - open blinds and keep window ledges free of clutter
    • only turn on the lights that are required
    • could you use a desk lamp rather than turning on the lights for the whole office?
  • Only fill the kettle as much as you need – this saves energy (overfilling the kettle sees £68 million disappear in a cloud of steam each year in energy bills) and means you don’t have to wait as long for your drink. Visit United Utilities for more details
    • If your office has an automatic water boiler see if it can be turned off in the evenings and at weekends
  • Put a lid on your pan when cooking, it saves 90% of the energy required to cook your food and it saves times as well
  • Set your computers to energy saving mode if they are not used for a short while
    • Myth – Screensavers save energy.  WRONG!
      • They do not save energy, so when not in use switch off your monitor
    • Switch off your monitor – even if you are away from your desk for a couple of minutes
    • Tidy your inbox and files stored on your computer - keeping large quantities of data (such as multiple copies of the same document or old documents) increases the amount of energy needed in your server room
  • If temperatures are too high turn the heating down rather than open windows
    • Did you know: Every 1°C increase in temperature increase energy consumption by 8%!
  • Do not increase the thermostat to a high setting to heat the room faster (vice versa for air conditioning)
    • This is a myth – it does not make a difference, but can cost a lot.  People may forgot and leave the settings so the room may overheat and wastes energy.  If the windows are then opened to cool the room, then the warm air escapes and energy (and money) are wasted.
  • Dress appropriately for the season –your body temperature can increase by 3°C just by wearing a jumper
  • Ensure that central heating radiators are not blocked by furniture, wherever practically possible, to enable the heat to come into the room
  • Reduce the need for air-conditioning by:
    • Switch off equipment and lighting where possible to reduce heat gains
    • Close the doors and windows when the air conditioning is on
    • Shade your windows to prevent the sun’s rays from entering your office and prevent the air in your office from warming up
    • Open the windows instead
  • Report any lighting, heating or cooling problems on the Estates webpages and click ‘online requests’
    • Doors and windows that are not sealed correctly
    • Any heating and cooling that is running at the same time
  • Buy energy efficient products; all electrical products have an European energy label, which tells you how efficient the appliance is at using energy – A++ is the most efficient and G is the worst
  • Carry out a mini office Energy Audit to see how eco-efficient your office or department is

Initiatives

  • Solar Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the EDEN, Health Sciences building and at Plas Caerdeon
  • The EDEN Building has solar thermal heating
  • The University has a programme of LED lighting replacements
  • I HEART MY Campus Challenge is an awareness and engagement programme for both staff and students
    • Staff - the Challenge celebrates and recognises environmental achievements whilst also assisting and encouraging teams to further improve their environmental performance.
    • Students - an energy competition between halls of residence to see which hall can reduce its energy consumption compared to the previous year
  • The University is investing in a network of electricity and gas sub meters to monitor the electricity and gas consumption at a building level
    • The sub meters will be connected to the University’s online energy software allowing us to monitor trends in consumption and focus resources
    • This data will be published monthly for each building

Did you know?

  • The University has reduced its electricity consumption by 12% since 2005-2006
  • The University has reduced its gas consumption by 4% since 2005-2006
  • The University has a number of solar photovoltaic panels on site – on the EDEN and Health Sciences Buildings and at Plas Caerdeon; and has plans to increase the number of arrays on site
  • The University has 23 buildings over 250 m2 and all have a Display Energy Certificate rating of D or above.
    • Non-dwellings are responsible for almost 20% of the UK’s energy consumption and carbon emissions. Display Energy Certificates have to be displayed in all buildings over 250m2 occupied by a public authority.
    • DECs provide a building energy rating from A to G, where A is very efficient and G is the least efficient and are based on the actual amount of metered energy used by a building over the last 12 months. The usage of the building is compared to a benchmark that represents performance indicative of all buildings of this type, with a rating D being a typical building.
    • The DECs are used to raise awareness of energy use and to inform staff, students and visitors about the energy use of the building.
  • Check out the Carbon Trust’s website for other energy facts:

    • Office lights‌ left on overnight uses enough energy in a year to heat a home for almost five months

    • A 2°C increase in Office temperature creates enough carbon in a year to fill a hot air balloon

    • A computer left on overnight for a year creates enough carbon to fill a double decker bus

    • A Photocopier left on standby overnight wastes enough energy to make 30 cups of tea