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Educational Theory Seminar Series

Overview

Seminars 2014/15

The Faculty of Education is pleased to host an Educational Theory Seminar Series this academic year 2014/15. You will find below a list of forthcoming seminars. 

The Educational Theory Seminars offer opportunities for scholars to explore work relating to educational theory broadly construed. There are wide-ranging interests and passions represented in this group, including philosophy of education (with some events supported by the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain), educational technology, higher education, international education, and disciplinary approaches to education theory (history, sociology, philosophy and psychology of education). These theoretical interests bear upon educational practice in a range of ways, both through evidence-based analysis and empirical data gathering, as well as informing attitudes to educational practice in contemporary life.

For further information, please contact Dr David Lewin, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education:

T: 0151 291 3890

E: lewind@hope.ac.uk

Seminar Programme

 

Date / Time                      Title                                                    Speaker                                 Venue                              
Wed 29th October 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Should universities teach employability?' Tristan McCowan (Institute of Education, London) EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wed 5th November 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) Education Team Research Discussion Education Studies Team EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 12th November 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Emotions and perspective taking during computer-supported argumentation' Chloe Shu-Hua Yeh EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 19th November 2014 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) 'The Problematics of Character Education' Kristjan Kristjansson (Birmingham) EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 26th November 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Young people's aspirations and neo-liberal ideas of citizenship' Konstanze Spohrer EDEN 006, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 3rd December 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Technology, Attention and Education' Dr David Lewin EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 14th January 2015

 "Does Community Cohesion Work?" Community cohesion in schools and the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of the child.

 Dr David Lundie HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 21st January 2015 ‘Policy, politics and academic research in UK education’  Dr Mike Finn LHBS 009, Hope Park 
Wednesday 28th January 20015 ‘The aesthetics of teaching: a neglected view of relationship in education’  Christine Doddington (Cambridge) HCA 105, Hope Park 
Wednesday 4th February 2015 ‘Emotions and perspective taking during computer-supported argumentation’  Chloe Shu-Hua Yeh  HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 11th February 2015 ‘The BERA Respecting Children and Young People Project’  Katy Virgurs (Staffs) HCA 102, Hope Park 
Wednesday 18th February 2015 Title TBC Eric Lybeck, Cambridge HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 25th February 2015 Title TBC Morwenna Griffiths (Edinburgh) HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 11th March 2015 ‘Do NEETs have Different Attitudes to Future Planning? – A Longitudinal Study of Young People’  Anesa Hosein (Surrey) HCA 105, Hope Park 
Wednesday 18th March 2015 Gove Legacy and Coalition Effect book launches  CEPA with Louis Coiffait (NAHT) and Brian Lightman (ASCL) / Dr Mike Finn HCA 103, Hope Park 
 Wednesday 25th March 2015 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) Title TBC  Sian Bayne (Edinburgh)  HCA 102
Wednesday 22nd April 2015 Title TBC Yvonne Downs (Huddersfield) EDEN 008, Hope Park
Wednesday 29th April 2015 Title TBC Ruth Boyask (Plymouth) EDEN 008, Hope Park
 Wednesday 6th May 2015 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) 'Family Values and Educational Justice'   Adam Swift (Warwick) HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 13th May 2015 “Playing the game of university applications: the aspirations and decision making of high-potential learners in schools with below average attainment”  Jo Rose (Bristol) EDEN 008, Hope Park 
Wednesday 20th May 2015 Title TBC TBC EDEN 004, Hope Park
Wednesday 27th May 2015 Title TBC Kathryn Ecclestone (Sheffield) EDEN 008, Hope Park

 

Further Seminar dates to be added soon.

Abstracts

Wednesday 3rd December 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) EDEN 012

‘Technology, Attention, and Education’ by Dr David Lewin, Liverpool Hope


In a world where higher education institutions are seeking opportunities to offer courses to a global market of ‘online learners,’ a commitment to the physical habitat of education might seem obsolete or anachronistic. Yet many educators speak for the uncanny quality of physical presence; that being physically face to face with students has a singular, irreducible pedagogical power. This raises a question: is the interest in online education really pedagogical? Although I argue that the move to e-learning is founded primarily on economic rather than pedagogical concerns, I want to get beyond the dichotomy that sees e-learning either as a panacea for educational limitations, or the erosion of the substantive educational encounter. I will argue for an ambivalent philosophy of technology that can make us more attentive to the appropriate place of technology in education.

 

Wednesday 19th November 2014 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) EDEN 012

‘The Problematics of Character Education’ by Kristján Kristjánsson, (Birmingham) 

In this presentation, I hypothesise that in order to be truly successful, a paradigm of moral education needs to satisfy four main criteria. It must: (1) Align with public perceptions and speak to the dominant anxieties and vulnerabilities of the given era. (2) Meet with a relatively broad political consensus and attract political interest, ideally both on the political ‘left’ and ‘right’. (3) Be underpinned by a respectable philosophical theory, providing it with a stable methodological, ontological, epistemological and moral basis.(4) Be supported by a dominant psychological theory, explaining how the ideals of the educational theory fit into actual human psychology and are, as such, attainable. I argue that neo-Aristotelian character education satisfies three of these criteria quite well, but the fourth much less so. I explain why that is the case and discuss possible remedies.

 

Wednesday 29th October 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) EDEN 012

Should universities teach employability? by Tristan McCowan, Institute of Education, London

Spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketization, universities have of late placed employability at the centre of their mission and functioning. This paper provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and manifestations of employability, and the historical conditions underpinning its emergence; second, the question is addressed of whether employability is a desirable societal and individual aim per se; third, there is a discussion of the fundamental purpose of the university, drawing on the well-known accounts of Newman and Collini, before – fourth – addressing the principal question of whether and in what way employability might fit within that purpose. It is argued that employability is a valid aim of universities only in so far as it is consistent with the central purpose of the institution to foster human understanding through open-ended enquiry. Further questions are discussed, namely whether other social institutions are better equipped to promote employability, possible costs for the university and differences between public and private institutions.

Overview

Seminars 2014/15

The Faculty of Education is pleased to host an Educational Theory Seminar Series this academic year 2014/15. You will find below a list of forthcoming seminars. 

The Educational Theory Seminars offer opportunities for scholars to explore work relating to educational theory broadly construed. There are wide-ranging interests and passions represented in this group, including philosophy of education (with some events supported by the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain), educational technology, higher education, international education, and disciplinary approaches to education theory (history, sociology, philosophy and psychology of education). These theoretical interests bear upon educational practice in a range of ways, both through evidence-based analysis and empirical data gathering, as well as informing attitudes to educational practice in contemporary life.

For further information, please contact Dr David Lewin, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education:

T: 0151 291 3890

E: lewind@hope.ac.uk

Seminar Programme

 

Date / Time                      Title                                                    Speaker                                 Venue                              
Wed 29th October 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Should universities teach employability?' Tristan McCowan (Institute of Education, London) EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wed 5th November 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) Education Team Research Discussion Education Studies Team EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 12th November 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Emotions and perspective taking during computer-supported argumentation' Chloe Shu-Hua Yeh EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 19th November 2014 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) 'The Problematics of Character Education' Kristjan Kristjansson (Birmingham) EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 26th November 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Young people's aspirations and neo-liberal ideas of citizenship' Konstanze Spohrer EDEN 006, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 3rd December 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) 'Technology, Attention and Education' Dr David Lewin EDEN 012, Hope Park Campus
Wednesday 14th January 2015

 "Does Community Cohesion Work?" Community cohesion in schools and the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of the child.

 Dr David Lundie HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 21st January 2015 ‘Policy, politics and academic research in UK education’  Dr Mike Finn LHBS 009, Hope Park 
Wednesday 28th January 20015 ‘The aesthetics of teaching: a neglected view of relationship in education’  Christine Doddington (Cambridge) HCA 105, Hope Park 
Wednesday 4th February 2015 ‘Emotions and perspective taking during computer-supported argumentation’  Chloe Shu-Hua Yeh  HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 11th February 2015 ‘The BERA Respecting Children and Young People Project’  Katy Virgurs (Staffs) HCA 102, Hope Park 
Wednesday 18th February 2015 Title TBC Eric Lybeck, Cambridge HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 25th February 2015 Title TBC Morwenna Griffiths (Edinburgh) HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 11th March 2015 ‘Do NEETs have Different Attitudes to Future Planning? – A Longitudinal Study of Young People’  Anesa Hosein (Surrey) HCA 105, Hope Park 
Wednesday 18th March 2015 Gove Legacy and Coalition Effect book launches  CEPA with Louis Coiffait (NAHT) and Brian Lightman (ASCL) / Dr Mike Finn HCA 103, Hope Park 
 Wednesday 25th March 2015 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) Title TBC  Sian Bayne (Edinburgh)  HCA 102
Wednesday 22nd April 2015 Title TBC Yvonne Downs (Huddersfield) EDEN 008, Hope Park
Wednesday 29th April 2015 Title TBC Ruth Boyask (Plymouth) EDEN 008, Hope Park
 Wednesday 6th May 2015 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) 'Family Values and Educational Justice'   Adam Swift (Warwick) HCA 102, Hope Park
Wednesday 13th May 2015 “Playing the game of university applications: the aspirations and decision making of high-potential learners in schools with below average attainment”  Jo Rose (Bristol) EDEN 008, Hope Park 
Wednesday 20th May 2015 Title TBC TBC EDEN 004, Hope Park
Wednesday 27th May 2015 Title TBC Kathryn Ecclestone (Sheffield) EDEN 008, Hope Park

 

Further Seminar dates to be added soon.

Abstracts

Wednesday 3rd December 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) EDEN 012

‘Technology, Attention, and Education’ by Dr David Lewin, Liverpool Hope


In a world where higher education institutions are seeking opportunities to offer courses to a global market of ‘online learners,’ a commitment to the physical habitat of education might seem obsolete or anachronistic. Yet many educators speak for the uncanny quality of physical presence; that being physically face to face with students has a singular, irreducible pedagogical power. This raises a question: is the interest in online education really pedagogical? Although I argue that the move to e-learning is founded primarily on economic rather than pedagogical concerns, I want to get beyond the dichotomy that sees e-learning either as a panacea for educational limitations, or the erosion of the substantive educational encounter. I will argue for an ambivalent philosophy of technology that can make us more attentive to the appropriate place of technology in education.

 

Wednesday 19th November 2014 (2.30pm - 3.45pm) EDEN 012

‘The Problematics of Character Education’ by Kristján Kristjánsson, (Birmingham) 

In this presentation, I hypothesise that in order to be truly successful, a paradigm of moral education needs to satisfy four main criteria. It must: (1) Align with public perceptions and speak to the dominant anxieties and vulnerabilities of the given era. (2) Meet with a relatively broad political consensus and attract political interest, ideally both on the political ‘left’ and ‘right’. (3) Be underpinned by a respectable philosophical theory, providing it with a stable methodological, ontological, epistemological and moral basis.(4) Be supported by a dominant psychological theory, explaining how the ideals of the educational theory fit into actual human psychology and are, as such, attainable. I argue that neo-Aristotelian character education satisfies three of these criteria quite well, but the fourth much less so. I explain why that is the case and discuss possible remedies.

 

Wednesday 29th October 2014 (2pm - 3.30pm) EDEN 012

Should universities teach employability? by Tristan McCowan, Institute of Education, London

Spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketization, universities have of late placed employability at the centre of their mission and functioning. This paper provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and manifestations of employability, and the historical conditions underpinning its emergence; second, the question is addressed of whether employability is a desirable societal and individual aim per se; third, there is a discussion of the fundamental purpose of the university, drawing on the well-known accounts of Newman and Collini, before – fourth – addressing the principal question of whether and in what way employability might fit within that purpose. It is argued that employability is a valid aim of universities only in so far as it is consistent with the central purpose of the institution to foster human understanding through open-ended enquiry. Further questions are discussed, namely whether other social institutions are better equipped to promote employability, possible costs for the university and differences between public and private institutions.