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Faculty News

Welcome to the Faculty of Education's News Section.  In this section you will find the latest news from the Faculty of Education.

 

'World-Leading' Research in the Faculty of Education

60% of the submitted research outputs have been judged to be of either ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’ quality

40% of the submitted research impact studies have been classed as ‘world leading’

Aspects of the Faculty’s research environment have been judged to have reached an ‘internationally excellent’ level

Overall 87% of the Faculty’s research profile has been classed as ‘internationally significant’ ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’. The remaining 13% was judged to be ‘nationally significant’.  None was unclassified

The Dean of the Faculty of Education, The Revd Professor Kenneth Newport, commented: “I am absolutely delighted with these results. They are about as objective a confirmation as one could get that in this Faculty we settle for nothing less than excellence in all that we do.  My congratulations to all our colleagues on an achievement of outstanding significance”.

 

‘Factory Schools’ Opponent Sir Anthony Seldon Launches Centre for Education Policy Analysis

Anthony Seldon Education LectureOne of Britain’s most prominent headmasters and political commentators visited Hope in November 2014 to launch the Faculty’s new ‘Centre for Education Policy Analysis’ (CEPA).

Sir Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College, Fellow of King’s College London and a bestselling historian of modern Britain and biographer of Prime Ministers including Tony Blair, John Major and Gordon Brown, delivered a lecture entitled: ‘The Joy That Education Should Be and The Misery it Often Is’ – taking aim at the narrow curriculum fostered by a goals-driven culture centred on numeracy and literacy targets in schools. Faculty’s new ‘Centre for Education Policy Analysis’ (CEPA).

“We have a 20th century school system and mindset for a 21st century world. We are bludgeoning pupils with literacy and numeracy and hard factual content taught in unimaginative ways, we are not stimulating students, inspiring individuals, sparking scholarship, cultivating curiosity, channelling character, encouraging entrepreneurial thinking, supporting self-discipline, and much more besides.”

Sir Anthony Seldon

 

Liverpool Hope University Partnership Ofsted Report Published (January 2014)

We are very pleased to share the now published Ofsted report following our recent Ofsted inspection. Please click above to read the full report via the Ofsted website.

Some highlights from the report include:

'Trainees are well supported in schools. The e-profile gives mentors a full picture of trainees’ experience, progress and targets, and they give considerable time to helping trainees in planning lessons and reflecting on their teaching.'

'In some cases, the feedback and coaching was of outstanding quality with a sharp focus on what would make a difference to pupils’ learning in the next lesson.'

'All indications are that the good outcomes in 2013 are strengthening'

'Several aspects of leadership and management are outstanding'

'The Hope tutor’ has emerged sharing the same attributes as ‘the Hope teacher’, particularly resilience, positive outlook and conviction. A shared vision of excellence, effective teamwork and a proactive approach have been key factors behind the rapidity of change on many fronts'

The report is an extremely positive and affirming summary of all the hard work and progress we have made since the last inspection in November 2012. We are especially proud of the acknowledgement of how partnership has been ‘rejuvenated and reinvigorated’ over the last 18 months. The trust and patience shown by many of our school colleagues has been a crucial factor in this success, as well as the generously shared professional expertise that steers us. We are confident that we are on a strong trajectory 'towards outstanding', and our focus now is building to that goal in all aspects of our provision.

 

Twins Achieve PGCE Awards and Secure Teaching Posts in the Same School

Rachel and Seana ThompsonDouble Achievement for Seana and Rachel Thompson

Not only did twins Rachel and Seana Thompson complete the same PGCE Primary degree at Liverpool Hope University, but they have both secured teaching jobs at the same Liverpool school.

The sisters, 24 from West Belfast who received their PGCE awards last week, specialised in Geography at Primary level. Previously, they studied the same undergraduate degree in Geography and International Development at the University of Ulster. They always planned to go to Liverpool Hope University together, and to stay in Liverpool after graduation. 

Seana said: “We always knew that we wanted to be teachers. When I was doing A Levels, I emailed Liverpool Hope University along with a few others to find out about entry requirements. They were the only ones that e-mailed back and this showed me that they must value their students”.

Rachel said: “There was just one job, but we both decided to apply for it. Then, during the application process, a second job came up, and after the interviews we were offered one each!”

The twins will now go on to jobs at St Peter and Paul Catholic Primary School in Kirkby teaching Y1 and Years 4/5.


Liverpool Hope University Associate Professor Dr David Bolt listed in 'Top Ten' most influential academics with a disability

0027 Dr David BoltLiverpool Hope University’s Associate Professor Dr David Bolt has been listed in the Disability News Service’s top ten most influential academics in the UK in the category of academia and research in its newly published list out now.

Dr Bolt, who has a visual impairment, came 7th on the prestigious list of the top ten influencers, with fellow UK academic and leading theoretical physicist Professor Stephen Hawking, Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology with the University of Cambridge, who has a form of motor neuron disease, at the top of the list.

The Disability News Service was launched in 2009 and provides in-depth coverage of all the important disability-related stories on equality employment, independent living, disability hate crime, politics, benefit and poverty as well as disability arts, culture and sport.

The idea, of course, was to rank disabled people in terms of their current influence. Or, to put it another way, to compare the effect they have on society, on how we think and feel, on how we live, and on how we are governed. On the products and services we buy, the films and television programmes we watch, the political parties we vote for, the books we read, the campaigns we support, and the protests we attend.

Dr Bolt is an Associate Professor within the Faculty of Education and Director of the Faculty’s Centre for Culture and Disability Studies (CCDS). He is Editor of the internationally recognised Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies. He also leads the Disability Studies MA and teaches on the Special Educational Needs course in the Faculty.

Last week Dr Bolt gave a keynote presentation on his recent book entitled The Metanarrative of Blindness: A Re-reading of Twentieth-Century Anglophone Writing (University of Michigan Press, 2014).

This week, Dr Bolt’s newest book entitled Changing Social Attitudes Toward Disability: Perspectives from Historical, Cultural, and Educational Studies (Routledge, 2014), a volume that brings the CCDS Seminar Series together, was launched at the University with invited guest speaker Professor Robert McRuer, Professor of English at George Washington University, who gave a response.

Notes:

- The Centre for Culture and Disability Studies (CCDS) is fundamentally concerned with social justice: with challenging and changing the inequalities and prejudices that people who are disabled face on a daily basis.  Though there are other centres for Disability Studies in the UK, the CCDS is unique in its focus on culture as the means by which prejudices around disability are circulated and perpetuated.

- Dr Bolt has a first class degree, an award for excellence, and an AHRC-funded doctorate from the University of Staffordshire. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, winner of a Student Led Teaching Award for Innovative Teaching and is the founding editor in Chief of ‘The Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies’ (Liverpool University Press). He is also Editor with New York colleagues Elizabeth Donaldson and Julia Miele Rodas, of the book series Literary Disability Studies (Palgrave Macmillan), and has places on the editorial boards of both Disability & Society and the Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness.

- Dr Bolt is founder of the International Network of Literary & Cultural Disability Scholars and was the first Honorary Research Fellow in the Centre for Disability Research at the University of Lancaster.

- He is joint editor of the book, The Madwoman and the Blindman: Jane Eyre, Discourse, Disability (Ohio State University Press, 2012) and co-guest editor of the special issue Theorising Culture and Disability: Interdisciplinary Dialogues (Review of Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa).

- Dr Bolt has published widely and has many international publications to his name, including journal articles, book chapters, special issues, and works of creative writing. Many of David’s articles have been included in The Disability Archive UK (University of Leeds) and some have been translated into Spanish for publication in Entre dos mundos. He is also author of The Metanarrative of Blindness: A Re-Reading of Twentieth-Century Anglophone Writing (University of Michigan Press, 2014).

- Please visit the Disability News Service website featuring the full list HERE.

 

Liverpool Hope University Partnership Ofsted Report Published (January 2014)

We are very pleased to share the now published Ofsted report following our recent Ofsted inspection. Please click the link above to read the full report via the Ofsted website.

Some highlights from the report include:

'Trainees are well supported in schools. The e-profile gives mentors a full picture of trainees’ experience, progress and targets, and they give considerable time to helping trainees in planning lessons and reflecting on their teaching.'

'In some cases, the feedback and coaching was of outstanding quality with a sharp focus on what would make a difference to pupils’ learning in the next lesson.'

'All indications are that the good outcomes in 2013 are strengthening.'

'Several aspects of leadership and management are outstanding'

'The Hope tutor’ has emerged sharing the same attributes as ‘the Hope teacher’, particularly resilience, positive outlook and conviction. A shared vision of excellence, effective teamwork and a proactive approach have been key factors behind the rapidity of change on many fronts'

 

The report is an extremely positive and affirming summary of all the hard work and progress we have made since the last inspection in November 2012. We are especially proud of the acknowledgement of how partnership has been ‘rejuvenated and reinvigorated’ over the last 18 months. The trust and patience shown by many of our school colleagues has been a crucial factor in this success, as well as the generously shared professional expertise that steers us. We are confident that we are on a strong trajectory 'towards outstanding', and our focus now is building to that goal in all aspects of our provision.

 

Hope graduate named as Primary Teacher of the Year for Wales

Kellie Williams, who graduated from her BA Primary Teaching QTS degree from Hope in 2006, has been named as Primary Teacher of the Year for Wales.

The award is part of a national Pearsons Teaching Awards and Kellie was announced as the winner after her headteacher nominated her for the prize. She will now go onto to receive her award at a ceremony in London where the overall national winner will be announced.

Published Books

In this section you will find a collection of recently published books by members of Academic staff in the Faculty of Education.

 

New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education

by Dr David Lewin, Dr Alex Guilherme and Dr Morgan White (Bloomsbury 2014)

New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education seeks to build a bridge between philosophical reflection and socio-political action by developing a range of critical discussions in the areas of ethics, politics and religion. This volume brings together established authorities and a new generation of scholars to ask whether philosophy of education can contribute to political and social discourse, or whether it is destined to remain the marginal gadfly of mainstream ideology.
The philosophy of education stands in danger of becoming a neglected field at precisely the moment we need to be able to reflect upon the increasingly apparent costs of the technocratic attitude to education. While many of the educational policy discussions of recent years seem far-reaching and radical, critical debate surrounding these initiatives remain largely at a populist level. New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education provides contemporary responses to philosophical issues that bear upon educational studies, policies and practices, contributing to the debate on the role of philosophy of education in an increasingly fractured intellectual milieu.

 

Language and Identity: Discourse in the World

by Dr Dave Evans with Chapters from Bernie Hughes and Wendy Bignold (Bloomsbury 2014)

Language not only expresses identities but also constructs them. Starting from that point, Language and Identity examines the interrelationships between language and identities. It finds that they are so closely interwoven, that words themselves are inscribed with ideological meanings. Words and language constitute meanings within discourses and discourses vary in power. The powerful ones reproduce more powerful meanings, colonize other discourses and marginalize or silence the least powerful languages and cultures. Language and culture death occur in extreme cases of marginalization.
 
This book also demonstrates the socioeconomic opportunities offered by language choice and the cultural allegiances of language, where groups have been able to create new lives for themselves by embracing new languages in new countries. Language can be a ‘double-edged sword’ of opportunity and marginalization. Language and Identity argues that bilingualism and in some cases multilingualism can both promote socioeconomic opportunity and combat culture death and marginalization. With sound theoretical perspectives drawing upon the work of Bakhtin, Vygotsky, Gumperz, Foucault and others, this book provides readers with a rationale to redress social injustice in the world by supporting minority linguistic and cultural identities and an acknowledgement that access to language can provide opportunity. 

 

Juvenile Delinquency and the Limits of Western Influence, 1850-2000

by Dr Heather Ellis (Palgrave 2014)

Heather EllisJuvenile Delinquency and the Limits of Western Influence, 1850-2000 brings together a wide range of case studies from across the globe, written by some of the leading scholars in the field, to explore the complex ways in which historical understandings of childhood and juvenile delinquency have been constructed in a global context.
The book highlights the continued entanglement of historical descriptions of the development of juvenile justice systems in other parts of the world with narratives of Western colonialism and the persistence of notions of a cultural divide between East and West. 
It also stresses the need to combine theoretical insights from traditional comparative history with new global history approaches. In doing so, the case studies examined in the volume reveal the significant limitations to the influence of Western ideas about juvenile delinquency in other parts of the world, as well as the important degree to which Western understandings of delinquency were constructed in a transnational context.

 

Changing Social Attitudes Toward Disability: Perspectives from Historical, Cultural and Educational Studies

by Dr David Bolt, Associate Professor (Routledge 2014)

0027 Dr David BoltWhilst legislation may have progressed internationally and nationally for disabled people, barriers continue to exist, of which one of the most pervasive and ingrained is attitudinal. Social attitudes are often rooted in a lack of knowledge and are perpetuated through erroneous stereotypes, and ultimately these legal and policy changes are ineffectual without a corresponding attitudinal change.

This unique book provides a much needed, multifaceted exploration of changing social attitudes toward disability. Adopting a tripartite approach to examining disability, the book looks at historical, cultural, and education studies, broadly conceived, in order to provide a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the documentation and endorsement of changing social attitudes toward disability.

Written by a selection of established and emerging scholars in the field, the book aims to break down some of the unhelpful boundaries between disciplines so that disability is recognised as an issue for all of us across all aspects of society, and to encourage readers to recognise disability in all its forms and within all its contexts.

This truly multidimensional approach to changing social attitudes will be important reading for students and researchers of disability from education, cultural and disability studies, and all those interested in the questions and issues surrounding attitudes toward disability.

The book brings together this year's CCDS Seminar Series with many contributors from the Educational Studies teams.

 

Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century

by Dr Heather Ellis, Senior Lecturer in History of Education (January 2014, BRILL)

Heather Ellis

Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century   explores the complex and shifting connections between scientists and scholars in Britain and Germany from the late eighteenth century to the interwar years. Based on the concept of the transnational network in both its informal and institutional dimensions, it deals with the transfer of knowledge and ideas in a variety of fields and disciplines. Furthermore, it examines the role which mutual perceptions and stereotypes played in Anglo-German collaboration.

 

 

 

Does Religious Education Work? A Multi-Dimensional Investigation

by Dr David Lundie, Lecturer in Education Studies (October 2013, Bloomsbury)

David LundieThis ground-breaking volume draws upon a rich and variegated range of methodologies to understand more fully the practices, policies and resources available in and to religious education in British schools. The descriptions, explanations and analyses undertaken here draw on an innovative combination of policy work, ethnography, Delphi methods, Actor Network Theory, questionnaires, textual analysis as well as theological and philosophical insight. It traces the evolution of religious education in a post-religious age from the creation of policy to the everyday experiences of teachers and students in the classroom. It begins by analysing the way in which policy has evolved since the 1970s with an examination of the social forces that have shaped curriculum development. It goes on to explore the impact and intentions of a diverse group of stakeholders with sometimes competing accounts of the purposes of religious educations. It then examines the manner in which policy is, or is not, enacted in the classroom. Finally, it explores contradictions and confusions, successes and failures, and the ways in which wider public debates enter the classroom. The book also exposes the challenge religious education teachers have in using the language of religion.

 

Buber and Education: Dialogue as Conflict Resolution

0088 Dr Alex Guilhermeby Dr Alex Guilherme, Lecturer in Philosophy of Education and Director,  (September 2013, Routledge)

Martin Buber (1878-1965) is considered one of the 20th century’s greatest thinkers and his contributions to philosophy, theology and education are testimony to this. His thought is founded on the idea that people are capable of two kinds of relations, namely I-Thou and I-It, emphasising the centrality of dialogue in all spheres of human life. For this reason, Buber is considered by many to be the philosopher of dialogue par excellence.

 

 

 

The Madwoman and the Blindman: Jane Eyre, discourse, disability 

0027 Dr David Boltby Dr David Bolt,  Senior Lecturer, Education and Disability Studies (2012, Columbus: Ohio State University Press)

The Madwoman and the Blindman engages, interrogates, and carries out disability studies scholarship and critical approaches to a singular and major literary text, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. To my knowledge, it is the only volume of its kind and it will be a much-discussed contribution to disability studies.” —Brenda Jo Brueggemann, professor of English, The Ohio State University.

The metanarrative of blindness: A re-reading of twentieth-century anglophone writing

by Dr David Bolt (2014, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press)

Although the theme of blindness occurs frequently in literature, literary criticism has rarely engaged the experiential knowledge of people with visual impairments. The Metanarrative of Blindness counters this trend by bringing to readings of twentieth-century works in English a perspective appreciative of impairment and disability. Author David Bolt examines representations of blindness in more than forty literary works, including writing by Kipling, Joyce, Synge, Orwell, H. G. Wells, Susan Sontag, and Stephen King, shedding light on the deficiencies of these representations and sometimes revealing an uncomfortable resonance with the Anglo-American science of eugenics.

 

The Reorientation of Higher Education: Challenging the East-West Dichotomy

0224 Dr Frank Suby Dr Frank Su, Lecturer in Education Studies (November 2012, London and Hong Kong: Springer)

Dr Frank Su's new book ‘The Reorientation of Higher Education: Challenging the East-West Dichotomy’ presents accounts of the repositioning of higher education institutions across a range of contexts in the East and the West. It argues that global governance, institutional organisation and academic practice are complementary elements within the process of institutional repositioning. 

 

Conferences

 Please find below details of conferences organised by the Faculty of Education.

 

Centre for Culture and Disability Studies 'Disability and Disciplines: The International Conference on Educational, Cultural and Disability Studies

Wednesday 1st and Thursday 2nd July 2015 (EDEN Arbour Room)

When we think of disability in Higher Education we are likely to think in terms of access, Learning Support Plans, and so on. These and other such things are of great importance but only represent part of the approach proposed at the biennial CCDS conference. What we explore is a more complex understanding of disability that challenges assumptions and prejudicial actions but also recognises qualities and positivity. 
While inclusive education is generally an improvement on integration and segregation, it often constitutes little more than what, in The Biopolitics of Disability (2015), David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder call a weakened strain of inclusionism. Until disability is recognised in the context of alternative lives and values that neither enforce nor reify normalcy we cannot truly encounter the material and ethical alternatives disabled lives engage. Inclusion may well be a legal requirement in some parts of the world, and perhaps a moral imperative everywhere, but it is also an educational opportunity. Not only students but also staff who identify as disabled should, as Mitchell and Snyder assert, recognize this peripheral embodiment as something to be cultivated as a form of alternative expertise, meaning that disability can become an active, unabashed, and less stigmatising part of classroom discourse. The aim of this biennial conference, then, is to encourage the transformation of academic disciplines by appreciating rather than avoiding disability. 
We welcome proposals from professors, lecturers, students, and other interested parties for papers that explore the benefits of interdisciplinarity between Disability Studies and subjects such as Aesthetics, Art, Business Studies, Creative Writing, Cultural Studies, Film Studies, Holocaust Studies, International Studies, Literary Studies, Literacy Studies, Management Studies, Media Studies, Medical Humanities, Museum Studies, Philosophy, Professional Studies, Special Educational Needs, and Technology. This list is meant to be suggestive rather than exhaustive. 
Paper proposals of 150-200 words should be sent to e-mail: disciplines@hope.ac.uk on or before 1st February 2015. 
Paper presentations are allocated 20 minute slots and themed panels of three papers are also encouraged. 

Dr David Bolt, Associate Professor


Recorded Lectures

The Faculty of Education is pleased to showcase a number of recorded events and distinguished lectures that have taken place in the Faculty in recent years.  

 

Academic Year 2013/14

Thursday 19th June 2014 - Dr Heather Ellis Book Launch "Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century" with invited guest speaker Chris Manias can be viewed via our YouTube Channel.

The full suite of Seminars as part of the Faculty's Dangerous Ideas in Education Seminar Series are available to view now.

 

Academic Year 2012/13

Education Studies Keynote Lectures

Short, engaging presentations of 30 minutes by people with something important to say about the role of education in today’s world. In 2012/13 keynote lectures related directly to present educational issues, though some came at education from an altogether different perspective (e.g. from the point of view of leaders in the Police force and of other social institutions).

All Education Keynote Lectures in 2012/13 were recorded and can be viewed via our YouTube channel.

Some of our Keynote Speakers:

Thursday 18th October 2012   Professor Roger Brown - 'The Higher Education White Paper one year on'

Thursday 15th November 2012   Frank Cottrell Boyce - 'The Box of Delights'

Thursday 13th December 2012    Cllr Jane Corbett - 'What Politics can do for Education'

 

Danny Boyle and Frank Cottrell Boyce 'Words of Wonder'

On Wednesday 10th October 2012 Danny Boyle and Frank Cottrell Boyce delivered an inspiring and unique talk at Liverpool Hope University in conjunction with the Reader Organisation to Faculty of Education Students at Hope Park entitled: 'Words of Wonder: The books that inspired the 2012 Opening Ceremony'.  The talk can be viewed via our YouTube Channel.

 

In the Media

Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) 

What are you reading? (19th June 2014)

THES Scholar Review by Dr David Lewin

Dr David Lewin, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education 

David Lewin, senior lecturer in philosophy of education, Liverpool Hope University, is reading Bernard Stiegler’s Taking Care of Youth and the Generations (Stanford University Press, 2010). “Watching an infant deftly operate an iPad makes one wonder about the pace and power of technological change and the consequent impact on young minds. These changes take time to understand and absorb. But Stiegler suggests that we will never be able to do so if those very changes are eroding our critical faculties. Alarmist or alarming? I can’t quite decide.”

 


Faculty News

Welcome to the Faculty of Education's News Section.  In this section you will find the latest news from the Faculty of Education.

 

'World-Leading' Research in the Faculty of Education

60% of the submitted research outputs have been judged to be of either ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’ quality

40% of the submitted research impact studies have been classed as ‘world leading’

Aspects of the Faculty’s research environment have been judged to have reached an ‘internationally excellent’ level

Overall 87% of the Faculty’s research profile has been classed as ‘internationally significant’ ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’. The remaining 13% was judged to be ‘nationally significant’.  None was unclassified

The Dean of the Faculty of Education, The Revd Professor Kenneth Newport, commented: “I am absolutely delighted with these results. They are about as objective a confirmation as one could get that in this Faculty we settle for nothing less than excellence in all that we do.  My congratulations to all our colleagues on an achievement of outstanding significance”.

 

‘Factory Schools’ Opponent Sir Anthony Seldon Launches Centre for Education Policy Analysis

Anthony Seldon Education LectureOne of Britain’s most prominent headmasters and political commentators visited Hope in November 2014 to launch the Faculty’s new ‘Centre for Education Policy Analysis’ (CEPA).

Sir Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College, Fellow of King’s College London and a bestselling historian of modern Britain and biographer of Prime Ministers including Tony Blair, John Major and Gordon Brown, delivered a lecture entitled: ‘The Joy That Education Should Be and The Misery it Often Is’ – taking aim at the narrow curriculum fostered by a goals-driven culture centred on numeracy and literacy targets in schools. Faculty’s new ‘Centre for Education Policy Analysis’ (CEPA).

“We have a 20th century school system and mindset for a 21st century world. We are bludgeoning pupils with literacy and numeracy and hard factual content taught in unimaginative ways, we are not stimulating students, inspiring individuals, sparking scholarship, cultivating curiosity, channelling character, encouraging entrepreneurial thinking, supporting self-discipline, and much more besides.”

Sir Anthony Seldon

 

Liverpool Hope University Partnership Ofsted Report Published (January 2014)

We are very pleased to share the now published Ofsted report following our recent Ofsted inspection. Please click above to read the full report via the Ofsted website.

Some highlights from the report include:

'Trainees are well supported in schools. The e-profile gives mentors a full picture of trainees’ experience, progress and targets, and they give considerable time to helping trainees in planning lessons and reflecting on their teaching.'

'In some cases, the feedback and coaching was of outstanding quality with a sharp focus on what would make a difference to pupils’ learning in the next lesson.'

'All indications are that the good outcomes in 2013 are strengthening'

'Several aspects of leadership and management are outstanding'

'The Hope tutor’ has emerged sharing the same attributes as ‘the Hope teacher’, particularly resilience, positive outlook and conviction. A shared vision of excellence, effective teamwork and a proactive approach have been key factors behind the rapidity of change on many fronts'

The report is an extremely positive and affirming summary of all the hard work and progress we have made since the last inspection in November 2012. We are especially proud of the acknowledgement of how partnership has been ‘rejuvenated and reinvigorated’ over the last 18 months. The trust and patience shown by many of our school colleagues has been a crucial factor in this success, as well as the generously shared professional expertise that steers us. We are confident that we are on a strong trajectory 'towards outstanding', and our focus now is building to that goal in all aspects of our provision.

 

Twins Achieve PGCE Awards and Secure Teaching Posts in the Same School

Rachel and Seana ThompsonDouble Achievement for Seana and Rachel Thompson

Not only did twins Rachel and Seana Thompson complete the same PGCE Primary degree at Liverpool Hope University, but they have both secured teaching jobs at the same Liverpool school.

The sisters, 24 from West Belfast who received their PGCE awards last week, specialised in Geography at Primary level. Previously, they studied the same undergraduate degree in Geography and International Development at the University of Ulster. They always planned to go to Liverpool Hope University together, and to stay in Liverpool after graduation. 

Seana said: “We always knew that we wanted to be teachers. When I was doing A Levels, I emailed Liverpool Hope University along with a few others to find out about entry requirements. They were the only ones that e-mailed back and this showed me that they must value their students”.

Rachel said: “There was just one job, but we both decided to apply for it. Then, during the application process, a second job came up, and after the interviews we were offered one each!”

The twins will now go on to jobs at St Peter and Paul Catholic Primary School in Kirkby teaching Y1 and Years 4/5.


Liverpool Hope University Associate Professor Dr David Bolt listed in 'Top Ten' most influential academics with a disability

0027 Dr David BoltLiverpool Hope University’s Associate Professor Dr David Bolt has been listed in the Disability News Service’s top ten most influential academics in the UK in the category of academia and research in its newly published list out now.

Dr Bolt, who has a visual impairment, came 7th on the prestigious list of the top ten influencers, with fellow UK academic and leading theoretical physicist Professor Stephen Hawking, Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology with the University of Cambridge, who has a form of motor neuron disease, at the top of the list.

The Disability News Service was launched in 2009 and provides in-depth coverage of all the important disability-related stories on equality employment, independent living, disability hate crime, politics, benefit and poverty as well as disability arts, culture and sport.

The idea, of course, was to rank disabled people in terms of their current influence. Or, to put it another way, to compare the effect they have on society, on how we think and feel, on how we live, and on how we are governed. On the products and services we buy, the films and television programmes we watch, the political parties we vote for, the books we read, the campaigns we support, and the protests we attend.

Dr Bolt is an Associate Professor within the Faculty of Education and Director of the Faculty’s Centre for Culture and Disability Studies (CCDS). He is Editor of the internationally recognised Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies. He also leads the Disability Studies MA and teaches on the Special Educational Needs course in the Faculty.

Last week Dr Bolt gave a keynote presentation on his recent book entitled The Metanarrative of Blindness: A Re-reading of Twentieth-Century Anglophone Writing (University of Michigan Press, 2014).

This week, Dr Bolt’s newest book entitled Changing Social Attitudes Toward Disability: Perspectives from Historical, Cultural, and Educational Studies (Routledge, 2014), a volume that brings the CCDS Seminar Series together, was launched at the University with invited guest speaker Professor Robert McRuer, Professor of English at George Washington University, who gave a response.

Notes:

- The Centre for Culture and Disability Studies (CCDS) is fundamentally concerned with social justice: with challenging and changing the inequalities and prejudices that people who are disabled face on a daily basis.  Though there are other centres for Disability Studies in the UK, the CCDS is unique in its focus on culture as the means by which prejudices around disability are circulated and perpetuated.

- Dr Bolt has a first class degree, an award for excellence, and an AHRC-funded doctorate from the University of Staffordshire. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, winner of a Student Led Teaching Award for Innovative Teaching and is the founding editor in Chief of ‘The Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies’ (Liverpool University Press). He is also Editor with New York colleagues Elizabeth Donaldson and Julia Miele Rodas, of the book series Literary Disability Studies (Palgrave Macmillan), and has places on the editorial boards of both Disability & Society and the Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness.

- Dr Bolt is founder of the International Network of Literary & Cultural Disability Scholars and was the first Honorary Research Fellow in the Centre for Disability Research at the University of Lancaster.

- He is joint editor of the book, The Madwoman and the Blindman: Jane Eyre, Discourse, Disability (Ohio State University Press, 2012) and co-guest editor of the special issue Theorising Culture and Disability: Interdisciplinary Dialogues (Review of Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa).

- Dr Bolt has published widely and has many international publications to his name, including journal articles, book chapters, special issues, and works of creative writing. Many of David’s articles have been included in The Disability Archive UK (University of Leeds) and some have been translated into Spanish for publication in Entre dos mundos. He is also author of The Metanarrative of Blindness: A Re-Reading of Twentieth-Century Anglophone Writing (University of Michigan Press, 2014).

- Please visit the Disability News Service website featuring the full list HERE.

 

Liverpool Hope University Partnership Ofsted Report Published (January 2014)

We are very pleased to share the now published Ofsted report following our recent Ofsted inspection. Please click the link above to read the full report via the Ofsted website.

Some highlights from the report include:

'Trainees are well supported in schools. The e-profile gives mentors a full picture of trainees’ experience, progress and targets, and they give considerable time to helping trainees in planning lessons and reflecting on their teaching.'

'In some cases, the feedback and coaching was of outstanding quality with a sharp focus on what would make a difference to pupils’ learning in the next lesson.'

'All indications are that the good outcomes in 2013 are strengthening.'

'Several aspects of leadership and management are outstanding'

'The Hope tutor’ has emerged sharing the same attributes as ‘the Hope teacher’, particularly resilience, positive outlook and conviction. A shared vision of excellence, effective teamwork and a proactive approach have been key factors behind the rapidity of change on many fronts'

 

The report is an extremely positive and affirming summary of all the hard work and progress we have made since the last inspection in November 2012. We are especially proud of the acknowledgement of how partnership has been ‘rejuvenated and reinvigorated’ over the last 18 months. The trust and patience shown by many of our school colleagues has been a crucial factor in this success, as well as the generously shared professional expertise that steers us. We are confident that we are on a strong trajectory 'towards outstanding', and our focus now is building to that goal in all aspects of our provision.

 

Hope graduate named as Primary Teacher of the Year for Wales

Kellie Williams, who graduated from her BA Primary Teaching QTS degree from Hope in 2006, has been named as Primary Teacher of the Year for Wales.

The award is part of a national Pearsons Teaching Awards and Kellie was announced as the winner after her headteacher nominated her for the prize. She will now go onto to receive her award at a ceremony in London where the overall national winner will be announced.

Published Books

In this section you will find a collection of recently published books by members of Academic staff in the Faculty of Education.

 

New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education

by Dr David Lewin, Dr Alex Guilherme and Dr Morgan White (Bloomsbury 2014)

New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education seeks to build a bridge between philosophical reflection and socio-political action by developing a range of critical discussions in the areas of ethics, politics and religion. This volume brings together established authorities and a new generation of scholars to ask whether philosophy of education can contribute to political and social discourse, or whether it is destined to remain the marginal gadfly of mainstream ideology.
The philosophy of education stands in danger of becoming a neglected field at precisely the moment we need to be able to reflect upon the increasingly apparent costs of the technocratic attitude to education. While many of the educational policy discussions of recent years seem far-reaching and radical, critical debate surrounding these initiatives remain largely at a populist level. New Perspectives in Philosophy of Education provides contemporary responses to philosophical issues that bear upon educational studies, policies and practices, contributing to the debate on the role of philosophy of education in an increasingly fractured intellectual milieu.

 

Language and Identity: Discourse in the World

by Dr Dave Evans with Chapters from Bernie Hughes and Wendy Bignold (Bloomsbury 2014)

Language not only expresses identities but also constructs them. Starting from that point, Language and Identity examines the interrelationships between language and identities. It finds that they are so closely interwoven, that words themselves are inscribed with ideological meanings. Words and language constitute meanings within discourses and discourses vary in power. The powerful ones reproduce more powerful meanings, colonize other discourses and marginalize or silence the least powerful languages and cultures. Language and culture death occur in extreme cases of marginalization.
 
This book also demonstrates the socioeconomic opportunities offered by language choice and the cultural allegiances of language, where groups have been able to create new lives for themselves by embracing new languages in new countries. Language can be a ‘double-edged sword’ of opportunity and marginalization. Language and Identity argues that bilingualism and in some cases multilingualism can both promote socioeconomic opportunity and combat culture death and marginalization. With sound theoretical perspectives drawing upon the work of Bakhtin, Vygotsky, Gumperz, Foucault and others, this book provides readers with a rationale to redress social injustice in the world by supporting minority linguistic and cultural identities and an acknowledgement that access to language can provide opportunity. 

 

Juvenile Delinquency and the Limits of Western Influence, 1850-2000

by Dr Heather Ellis (Palgrave 2014)

Heather EllisJuvenile Delinquency and the Limits of Western Influence, 1850-2000 brings together a wide range of case studies from across the globe, written by some of the leading scholars in the field, to explore the complex ways in which historical understandings of childhood and juvenile delinquency have been constructed in a global context.
The book highlights the continued entanglement of historical descriptions of the development of juvenile justice systems in other parts of the world with narratives of Western colonialism and the persistence of notions of a cultural divide between East and West. 
It also stresses the need to combine theoretical insights from traditional comparative history with new global history approaches. In doing so, the case studies examined in the volume reveal the significant limitations to the influence of Western ideas about juvenile delinquency in other parts of the world, as well as the important degree to which Western understandings of delinquency were constructed in a transnational context.

 

Changing Social Attitudes Toward Disability: Perspectives from Historical, Cultural and Educational Studies

by Dr David Bolt, Associate Professor (Routledge 2014)

0027 Dr David BoltWhilst legislation may have progressed internationally and nationally for disabled people, barriers continue to exist, of which one of the most pervasive and ingrained is attitudinal. Social attitudes are often rooted in a lack of knowledge and are perpetuated through erroneous stereotypes, and ultimately these legal and policy changes are ineffectual without a corresponding attitudinal change.

This unique book provides a much needed, multifaceted exploration of changing social attitudes toward disability. Adopting a tripartite approach to examining disability, the book looks at historical, cultural, and education studies, broadly conceived, in order to provide a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the documentation and endorsement of changing social attitudes toward disability.

Written by a selection of established and emerging scholars in the field, the book aims to break down some of the unhelpful boundaries between disciplines so that disability is recognised as an issue for all of us across all aspects of society, and to encourage readers to recognise disability in all its forms and within all its contexts.

This truly multidimensional approach to changing social attitudes will be important reading for students and researchers of disability from education, cultural and disability studies, and all those interested in the questions and issues surrounding attitudes toward disability.

The book brings together this year's CCDS Seminar Series with many contributors from the Educational Studies teams.

 

Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century

by Dr Heather Ellis, Senior Lecturer in History of Education (January 2014, BRILL)

Heather Ellis

Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century   explores the complex and shifting connections between scientists and scholars in Britain and Germany from the late eighteenth century to the interwar years. Based on the concept of the transnational network in both its informal and institutional dimensions, it deals with the transfer of knowledge and ideas in a variety of fields and disciplines. Furthermore, it examines the role which mutual perceptions and stereotypes played in Anglo-German collaboration.

 

 

 

Does Religious Education Work? A Multi-Dimensional Investigation

by Dr David Lundie, Lecturer in Education Studies (October 2013, Bloomsbury)

David LundieThis ground-breaking volume draws upon a rich and variegated range of methodologies to understand more fully the practices, policies and resources available in and to religious education in British schools. The descriptions, explanations and analyses undertaken here draw on an innovative combination of policy work, ethnography, Delphi methods, Actor Network Theory, questionnaires, textual analysis as well as theological and philosophical insight. It traces the evolution of religious education in a post-religious age from the creation of policy to the everyday experiences of teachers and students in the classroom. It begins by analysing the way in which policy has evolved since the 1970s with an examination of the social forces that have shaped curriculum development. It goes on to explore the impact and intentions of a diverse group of stakeholders with sometimes competing accounts of the purposes of religious educations. It then examines the manner in which policy is, or is not, enacted in the classroom. Finally, it explores contradictions and confusions, successes and failures, and the ways in which wider public debates enter the classroom. The book also exposes the challenge religious education teachers have in using the language of religion.

 

Buber and Education: Dialogue as Conflict Resolution

0088 Dr Alex Guilhermeby Dr Alex Guilherme, Lecturer in Philosophy of Education and Director,  (September 2013, Routledge)

Martin Buber (1878-1965) is considered one of the 20th century’s greatest thinkers and his contributions to philosophy, theology and education are testimony to this. His thought is founded on the idea that people are capable of two kinds of relations, namely I-Thou and I-It, emphasising the centrality of dialogue in all spheres of human life. For this reason, Buber is considered by many to be the philosopher of dialogue par excellence.

 

 

 

The Madwoman and the Blindman: Jane Eyre, discourse, disability 

0027 Dr David Boltby Dr David Bolt,  Senior Lecturer, Education and Disability Studies (2012, Columbus: Ohio State University Press)

The Madwoman and the Blindman engages, interrogates, and carries out disability studies scholarship and critical approaches to a singular and major literary text, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. To my knowledge, it is the only volume of its kind and it will be a much-discussed contribution to disability studies.” —Brenda Jo Brueggemann, professor of English, The Ohio State University.

The metanarrative of blindness: A re-reading of twentieth-century anglophone writing

by Dr David Bolt (2014, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press)

Although the theme of blindness occurs frequently in literature, literary criticism has rarely engaged the experiential knowledge of people with visual impairments. The Metanarrative of Blindness counters this trend by bringing to readings of twentieth-century works in English a perspective appreciative of impairment and disability. Author David Bolt examines representations of blindness in more than forty literary works, including writing by Kipling, Joyce, Synge, Orwell, H. G. Wells, Susan Sontag, and Stephen King, shedding light on the deficiencies of these representations and sometimes revealing an uncomfortable resonance with the Anglo-American science of eugenics.

 

The Reorientation of Higher Education: Challenging the East-West Dichotomy

0224 Dr Frank Suby Dr Frank Su, Lecturer in Education Studies (November 2012, London and Hong Kong: Springer)

Dr Frank Su's new book ‘The Reorientation of Higher Education: Challenging the East-West Dichotomy’ presents accounts of the repositioning of higher education institutions across a range of contexts in the East and the West. It argues that global governance, institutional organisation and academic practice are complementary elements within the process of institutional repositioning. 

 

Conferences

 Please find below details of conferences organised by the Faculty of Education.

 

Centre for Culture and Disability Studies 'Disability and Disciplines: The International Conference on Educational, Cultural and Disability Studies

Wednesday 1st and Thursday 2nd July 2015 (EDEN Arbour Room)

When we think of disability in Higher Education we are likely to think in terms of access, Learning Support Plans, and so on. These and other such things are of great importance but only represent part of the approach proposed at the biennial CCDS conference. What we explore is a more complex understanding of disability that challenges assumptions and prejudicial actions but also recognises qualities and positivity. 
While inclusive education is generally an improvement on integration and segregation, it often constitutes little more than what, in The Biopolitics of Disability (2015), David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder call a weakened strain of inclusionism. Until disability is recognised in the context of alternative lives and values that neither enforce nor reify normalcy we cannot truly encounter the material and ethical alternatives disabled lives engage. Inclusion may well be a legal requirement in some parts of the world, and perhaps a moral imperative everywhere, but it is also an educational opportunity. Not only students but also staff who identify as disabled should, as Mitchell and Snyder assert, recognize this peripheral embodiment as something to be cultivated as a form of alternative expertise, meaning that disability can become an active, unabashed, and less stigmatising part of classroom discourse. The aim of this biennial conference, then, is to encourage the transformation of academic disciplines by appreciating rather than avoiding disability. 
We welcome proposals from professors, lecturers, students, and other interested parties for papers that explore the benefits of interdisciplinarity between Disability Studies and subjects such as Aesthetics, Art, Business Studies, Creative Writing, Cultural Studies, Film Studies, Holocaust Studies, International Studies, Literary Studies, Literacy Studies, Management Studies, Media Studies, Medical Humanities, Museum Studies, Philosophy, Professional Studies, Special Educational Needs, and Technology. This list is meant to be suggestive rather than exhaustive. 
Paper proposals of 150-200 words should be sent to e-mail: disciplines@hope.ac.uk on or before 1st February 2015. 
Paper presentations are allocated 20 minute slots and themed panels of three papers are also encouraged. 

Dr David Bolt, Associate Professor


Recorded Lectures

The Faculty of Education is pleased to showcase a number of recorded events and distinguished lectures that have taken place in the Faculty in recent years.  

 

Academic Year 2013/14

Thursday 19th June 2014 - Dr Heather Ellis Book Launch "Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century" with invited guest speaker Chris Manias can be viewed via our YouTube Channel.

The full suite of Seminars as part of the Faculty's Dangerous Ideas in Education Seminar Series are available to view now.

 

Academic Year 2012/13

Education Studies Keynote Lectures

Short, engaging presentations of 30 minutes by people with something important to say about the role of education in today’s world. In 2012/13 keynote lectures related directly to present educational issues, though some came at education from an altogether different perspective (e.g. from the point of view of leaders in the Police force and of other social institutions).

All Education Keynote Lectures in 2012/13 were recorded and can be viewed via our YouTube channel.

Some of our Keynote Speakers:

Thursday 18th October 2012   Professor Roger Brown - 'The Higher Education White Paper one year on'

Thursday 15th November 2012   Frank Cottrell Boyce - 'The Box of Delights'

Thursday 13th December 2012    Cllr Jane Corbett - 'What Politics can do for Education'

 

Danny Boyle and Frank Cottrell Boyce 'Words of Wonder'

On Wednesday 10th October 2012 Danny Boyle and Frank Cottrell Boyce delivered an inspiring and unique talk at Liverpool Hope University in conjunction with the Reader Organisation to Faculty of Education Students at Hope Park entitled: 'Words of Wonder: The books that inspired the 2012 Opening Ceremony'.  The talk can be viewed via our YouTube Channel.

 

In the Media

Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) 

What are you reading? (19th June 2014)

THES Scholar Review by Dr David Lewin

Dr David Lewin, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education 

David Lewin, senior lecturer in philosophy of education, Liverpool Hope University, is reading Bernard Stiegler’s Taking Care of Youth and the Generations (Stanford University Press, 2010). “Watching an infant deftly operate an iPad makes one wonder about the pace and power of technological change and the consequent impact on young minds. These changes take time to understand and absorb. But Stiegler suggests that we will never be able to do so if those very changes are eroding our critical faculties. Alarmist or alarming? I can’t quite decide.”