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Listening skills

During your time at University, you will need to develop your listening skills. You will need to actively listen during your seminars, learning and processing information about your subjects, whilst taking notes. You will need to engage in your tutorials, discussing and listening to your peers and your academics, building new rapports with others. Take a look at the different resources available on listening skills before you start your undergraduate degree.

Universal class website offers guidance on the three basic listening models and how to effectively use them.

Education Corner article about listening skills offers tips and strategies that will help you be a more attentive listener.

Recording your notes website page by Skills for OU Study at The Open University explains how recording your notes can be useful and tips for recording. By recording your notes you can listen to them on the go, whether you are walking home or on the bus or revising for an exam.

You can download an app such as Dragon Dictation or Supernotes to record classes but you must always ask your academic for permission first.

Reading skills

Active reading is a skill that is developed by critically engaging with the content you are reading, proactively questioning and delving deeper into the book, journal or article. If you read passively, you may need to read the page over and over again before you internalise it. If you are more focused on the material you are reading, you will be able to form your own opinion about the content and will be able to summarise the content in your own words. 

Tips for Active Reading 

Reading Efficiently advice sheet from Library Support at Loughborough University looks at the different reading techniques such as skimming, scanning and speed reading.

The Open University has information on the SQ3R technique that is used for actively engaging with and extracting meaning from content. 

The University of Southampton Reading Academically guide looks at strategies and systems to improve your efficiency and effectiveness. This useful guide explores how you can improve your critical reading skills and help you to interact more effectively with texts and articles. 

Note taking

Note taking is a technique that will help you write your essays, dissertation and help you revise for your exams. This useful skill allows you to gain a deeper understanding of your subject, record and organise key information taken from your lectures and research. 

Taking Notes advice sheet from Library Support at Loughborough University summarises the importance of taking notes and gives useful tips on how to take notes in class, from written sources and how to condense notes.

Note taking can be done in many different forms, so find a technique that suits you:

 

Mind maps (visual form of note-taking, where a central idea expands outward through use of colours, images and words)

This Mind Mapping document created by the Writing Centre Learning Guide at The University of Adelaide, tells you what a Mind Map is, how to create one and what the benefits are.

Illumine Training offers useful Mind Map examples on their website page that you can download,  the examples are from a range of different subject areas, some are hand drawn and some have been produced on Mind Mapping software. 

In the library, we also have Inspiration software available on the PCs on the ground floor, 1st floor and on 5 laptops available from the HCA entrance. This software offers different techniques such as Concept Mapping (links concepts and ideas together with words), Mind Mapping, Webbing (brainstorming method in form of a visual map) and Outlining (used to organise thoughts and information with a heading and subheadings).

Evernote is also a great app that allows you to capture all your ideas, thoughts and images in different ways. You can record ideas, create lists and share files with friends.

 

Using abbreviations (shortened versions of words that will save you time when taking notes)

The Helpful abbreviations for speedy note-taking handout created by the Academic Skills Unit at Portsmouth University contain a list of common abbreviations that can be used when note-taking from lectures. It explains two common techniques that can be applied to any word.

This How to take lectures notes quickly website page from essayzone.co.uk has a list of common academic abbreviations and symbols, which you can use in your lectures and whilst revising.

 

Highlighting and annotating (identifying and then highlighting the main point) (summarising in your own words an argument or idea/concept)

Highlighting and annotating by Study Success at Sussex has a useful exercise to help you practice identifying the key areas in a text using highlighting and annotation.

Reading and Study Strategies: Annotating a text by Writers' Center Eastern Washington University has a step to step guide on how to annotate a source. 

Once you have reviewed your notes and done the further reading you will be ready to start writing your essay, have a look at our prewriting and structure resource pages to help you get started. 

 

Presenting skills

During your time at University, you may be asked to work in a group, collaboratively producing a piece of work that you will need to present or you could be due to go on a placement within a school and will be leading a class. Presentation skills will not only help you during your time here at Liverpool Hope but also when you graduate and go onto to full-time employment. You will need to learn how to engage with your audience, prepare your presentation, whether that be an online piece or a poster, and practice presenting. Giving a good presentation is not just about what you are saying, but how you are saying it. Have a look at some of the resources and links below to prepare for your presentation:

Preparing and Writing Academic Posters

How to Design an Effective Presentation

Presentation Checklist 

The Palgrave Study Skills website offers guidance on group work and teamwork.

The Open University website page offers guidance on understanding and engaging with your audience. 

The Palgrave Study Skills website also offers useful tips on presenting and to help you prepare for a presentation.

If you tend to speed through your speech or talk too slowly then you can download a free Metronome app on your phone that will help you.

If you would like to practice presenting for a job interview please contact our Careers department

Time Management

Staying organised throughout your academic journey will help you keep track of your goals and aid with coursework planning and revision. Find out how good your time management is on MindTools website page, then calculate your score and evaluate your ability.

The Open Universities website section on Time management skills covers helpful tips on planning and prioritising, study goals and time management tips.

Study Guides and Strategies website offers guidance on time management, developing self-discipline, managing stress and motivating exercises.

You can download a weekly planner app onto your phone or iPad such as Week Plan or Planner Pro for free. These apps are great tools to help you manage your time. You can also download the free My study Life app as it is designed to store your classes, reminders for deadlines and exams to help you stay organised. To avoid procrastination download the Productivity Owl extension to Google Chrome as it will eliminate your time wasting habits on the internet. 

Listening skills

During your time at University, you will need to develop your listening skills. You will need to actively listen during your seminars, learning and processing information about your subjects, whilst taking notes. You will need to engage in your tutorials, discussing and listening to your peers and your academics, building new rapports with others. Take a look at the different resources available on listening skills before you start your undergraduate degree.

Universal class website offers guidance on the three basic listening models and how to effectively use them.

Education Corner article about listening skills offers tips and strategies that will help you be a more attentive listener.

Recording your notes website page by Skills for OU Study at The Open University explains how recording your notes can be useful and tips for recording. By recording your notes you can listen to them on the go, whether you are walking home or on the bus or revising for an exam.

You can download an app such as Dragon Dictation or Supernotes to record classes but you must always ask your academic for permission first.

Reading skills

Active reading is a skill that is developed by critically engaging with the content you are reading, proactively questioning and delving deeper into the book, journal or article. If you read passively, you may need to read the page over and over again before you internalise it. If you are more focused on the material you are reading, you will be able to form your own opinion about the content and will be able to summarise the content in your own words. 

Tips for Active Reading 

Reading Efficiently advice sheet from Library Support at Loughborough University looks at the different reading techniques such as skimming, scanning and speed reading.

The Open University has information on the SQ3R technique that is used for actively engaging with and extracting meaning from content. 

The University of Southampton Reading Academically guide looks at strategies and systems to improve your efficiency and effectiveness. This useful guide explores how you can improve your critical reading skills and help you to interact more effectively with texts and articles. 

Note taking

Note taking is a technique that will help you write your essays, dissertation and help you revise for your exams. This useful skill allows you to gain a deeper understanding of your subject, record and organise key information taken from your lectures and research. 

Taking Notes advice sheet from Library Support at Loughborough University summarises the importance of taking notes and gives useful tips on how to take notes in class, from written sources and how to condense notes.

Note taking can be done in many different forms, so find a technique that suits you:

 

Mind maps (visual form of note-taking, where a central idea expands outward through use of colours, images and words)

This Mind Mapping document created by the Writing Centre Learning Guide at The University of Adelaide, tells you what a Mind Map is, how to create one and what the benefits are.

Illumine Training offers useful Mind Map examples on their website page that you can download,  the examples are from a range of different subject areas, some are hand drawn and some have been produced on Mind Mapping software. 

In the library, we also have Inspiration software available on the PCs on the ground floor, 1st floor and on 5 laptops available from the HCA entrance. This software offers different techniques such as Concept Mapping (links concepts and ideas together with words), Mind Mapping, Webbing (brainstorming method in form of a visual map) and Outlining (used to organise thoughts and information with a heading and subheadings).

Evernote is also a great app that allows you to capture all your ideas, thoughts and images in different ways. You can record ideas, create lists and share files with friends.

 

Using abbreviations (shortened versions of words that will save you time when taking notes)

The Helpful abbreviations for speedy note-taking handout created by the Academic Skills Unit at Portsmouth University contain a list of common abbreviations that can be used when note-taking from lectures. It explains two common techniques that can be applied to any word.

This How to take lectures notes quickly website page from essayzone.co.uk has a list of common academic abbreviations and symbols, which you can use in your lectures and whilst revising.

 

Highlighting and annotating (identifying and then highlighting the main point) (summarising in your own words an argument or idea/concept)

Highlighting and annotating by Study Success at Sussex has a useful exercise to help you practice identifying the key areas in a text using highlighting and annotation.

Reading and Study Strategies: Annotating a text by Writers' Center Eastern Washington University has a step to step guide on how to annotate a source. 

Once you have reviewed your notes and done the further reading you will be ready to start writing your essay, have a look at our prewriting and structure resource pages to help you get started. 

 

Presenting skills

During your time at University, you may be asked to work in a group, collaboratively producing a piece of work that you will need to present or you could be due to go on a placement within a school and will be leading a class. Presentation skills will not only help you during your time here at Liverpool Hope but also when you graduate and go onto to full-time employment. You will need to learn how to engage with your audience, prepare your presentation, whether that be an online piece or a poster, and practice presenting. Giving a good presentation is not just about what you are saying, but how you are saying it. Have a look at some of the resources and links below to prepare for your presentation:

Preparing and Writing Academic Posters

How to Design an Effective Presentation

Presentation Checklist 

The Palgrave Study Skills website offers guidance on group work and teamwork.

The Open University website page offers guidance on understanding and engaging with your audience. 

The Palgrave Study Skills website also offers useful tips on presenting and to help you prepare for a presentation.

If you tend to speed through your speech or talk too slowly then you can download a free Metronome app on your phone that will help you.

If you would like to practice presenting for a job interview please contact our Careers department

Time Management

Staying organised throughout your academic journey will help you keep track of your goals and aid with coursework planning and revision. Find out how good your time management is on MindTools website page, then calculate your score and evaluate your ability.

The Open Universities website section on Time management skills covers helpful tips on planning and prioritising, study goals and time management tips.

Study Guides and Strategies website offers guidance on time management, developing self-discipline, managing stress and motivating exercises.

You can download a weekly planner app onto your phone or iPad such as Week Plan or Planner Pro for free. These apps are great tools to help you manage your time. You can also download the free My study Life app as it is designed to store your classes, reminders for deadlines and exams to help you stay organised. To avoid procrastination download the Productivity Owl extension to Google Chrome as it will eliminate your time wasting habits on the internet.