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Overview

Welcome from the Directors

Bryce Evans Lille Institute 
Dr Ioannis Panoussis

In the current global climate, the fostering of cross-border academic collaboration is important.

That is why a firm Anglo-French academic alliance is so unusual and significant.

In 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille decided to form a strategic alliance around teaching and research. Central to this alliance is the development of a European Institute. This body aims to provide a framework for cross-disciplinary research projects, publications, joint masters degrees and co-supervision of PhD students.

This website provides information on how the European Institute functions, what we are achieving together and what we will achieve in the future.

History teaches us that European cooperation is essential in achieving peace, growth and progress; it is in this spirit that the Institut Européen/European Institute operates and in this spirit that we as educators, students and citizens thrive.

Dr Bryce Evans and Dr Ioannis Panoussis

Directors of the Institut Européen/European Institute

 

Aims of the partnership

In June 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille signed a strategic roadmap detailing their plans for joint collaboration around research, teaching, and development of joint degree programmes to 2019 and beyond.  

The Roadmap for Strategic Alliance was signed by the two Rectors, Professor Gerald Pillay and Professor Pierre Giorgini in Lille. The two universities have already embarked on a student and staff exchange programme. 

Aims of the Institute 

  • Supporting bilateral staff collaboration (Erasmus exchange and research)
  • Fostering student exchange
  • Developing research collaboration
  • Promoting public engagement
  • Building towards joint degree programmes where appropriate

The investment in this partnership by both universities steps up strategic research collaboration and aims to have a significant impact in the UK, France and across Europe.

The Institute is embedded within eight academic projects involving a wide array of disciplines - English language and literature, business, law, environmental studies, politics and international relations, education, health sciences, psychology, theology and philosophy.

Fostering new, intellectually and culturally enriching learning opportunities for students is high on the agenda of both universities. It is hoped that studying abroad, gaining work experience and volunteering will be significantly enhanced by the new agreement.

People and Places

Organisational structure

The Institute is directed by Dr Bryce Evans (Liverpool Hope) and Dr Ioannis Panoussis (Lille).

There is a strategic committee composed of academics which meets biennially. 

There are a number of interdisciplinary working groups based around the following areas:

  • Future of Europe (law, politics, economics, sociology)
  • Enterprise and sustainability (business, marketing, economics)
  • Teaching innovation (Education)
  • Health care, society and policy (social work, policy studies, psychology)
  • Literature and popular culture (literature, media)
  • Hermeneutics (theology, philosophy)
  • Ecology and environment (geography, ecology)

 

Academic Committee Members 

Dr. Bryce Evans Co-director

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Ms. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator

 

More about Lille

For more information about Lille, visit the Lonely Planet website.

For more information about l’Université Catholique de Lille, please visit their website.

 

More about Liverpool

For more information about Liverpool, visit the Lonely Planet website.

Events 2017

‌The Institute oversees and facilitates cooperation in the following areas:

  • Research collaboration
  • Teaching collaboration
  • Student exchanges
  • Joint Masters programmes

 

PhD scholarships programme

For more information about the PhD scholarships programmes, download the following PDFs:

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Information Leaflet

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Personal Statement Guidance Notes

 

Europe Day annual lecture

The Institute holds an annual distinguished lecture on Europe Day (on or around 9 May).

 

Annual conference

There is an annual themed conference featuring academics from both universities and other European institutions.

 

Upcoming Events

28 Feb to 3 March 2017
Liverpool Hope University students take a Erasmus taster trip to Lille

Guest Lecture Series 2017

 
8th March 2017 Patricia Connell delivers a lecture on the French Diaspora and Brexit
w/c Monday 20 March 2017  Address by Matt Kelly, editor New European newspaper
Monday 27th March 2017 Roundtable: 'Brexit and Local EU Nationals' 
The European Institute welcomes you to a discussion featuring a selection of the city's Honorary Consuls, followed by a reception.
 
Featuring 
Viorel Raducanescu, Consulate of Romania and President of the Consular Corps
Philip Daniel, Consulate of France
Date TBC Address by Christophe Premat - Deputy for French residents overseas
Date TBC  Address by Mark Durcan, MP (SDLP - Foyle) member of the UK Brexit Committee

Conferences 2017

 
8 May Europe Day  Keynote Lecture - Axelle Lemaire, French Minister of State for the Digital Sector and Innovation 

 

Inaugural distinguished Guest Lecture 2017 - Brexit and the French ‌Diaspora

 

For the inaugural distinguished guest lecture of its 2017 series, and to mark International Women's Day, the European Institute at Liverpool Hope University hosted Brexit and the French Diaspora, a reception followed by a talk by Mrs Patricia Connell, Délégué Consulaire.
 
Mrs Connell addressed the phrase "Brexit means Brexit", asking what does it really mean? She went on to explain how Brexit is already affecting the 3.3 million Europeans living here and the 1.5 million British citizens living in the EU.

Patricia Connell, an elected consular delegate who represents the French community in the UK, addressed these questions as well as talking about her life and work in the UK. A centre-right candidate (UDI) in the French parliamentary elections in June this year, her career has been spent in marketing and communications, with senior roles in both global manufacturing groups and in pan-European agencies. She has been actively engaged in the promotion of French companies, products and charitable associations for the last 20 years and is also currently the CEO of an bi-lingual online magazine for Francophones and Francophiles. In response to the uncertainty created for the French community by the Brexit vote she has organised meetings across the UK and Ireland to offer practical help and assistance to her fellow French citizens.

The lecture was attended by staff, students and the public; before the address Mrs Connell was welcomed to Hope by Vice Chancellor and Rector Professor Gerald Pillay.

 

Liverpool Hope University Erasmus trip to l’Université Catholique de Lille 28th February – 3rd March 2017 

Click here to listen to LHU and L'UCL students discussing life at Liverpool Hope      

 

Erasmus exchange sees Professor Galina Paramei teach at l'Université Catholique de Lille

Psychology Professor Galina Paramei delivered a series of lectures during a recent Erasmus exchange trip to l'Université Catholique de Lille.

The exchange was arranged under the Teaching Mobility Scheme established between the Departments of Psychology at both institutions.

Professor Paramei delivered three lectures on the Bilingual Mind, Research Methods: Experimental Design in Psychological Studies and the Bilingual Mind and Brain.

She said: “The highlight of my teaching experience was the high attendance rate and the genuine interest and engagement of the students. In particular, my Research Methods lecture that took place between 8-10 am, was attended by almost all students of the first year – despite the early hour. Also, I was told that many of the students are not very proficient in English, but their attention during the two hours was exceptional.”

As well as delivering teaching sessions, Professor Paramei used the trip to familiarise herself with the Lille Psychology Department’s curriculum and explored the academic research specialisms for potential future collaborations.

Speaking about the partnership between Liverpool Hope and Lille, Professor Paramei said: “The Department in Lille has expertise in Work Psychology, which - in teaching - could complement/be included in our curriculum in Applied Psychology. In research, I could envisage a collaboration between Dr Schoenenberger, who predominantly pursues qualitative research, with a new member of Hope’s Psychology team Dr Kim Gordon.

“Another potentially promising link is in Clinical Neuropsychology, with Dr Bruno Lenne, a neuropsychologist who uses EEG, works in a neurological hospital, and whose research interests are in clinical studies, including multiple sclerosis and addiction.”

Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille recently signed a strategic roadmap detailing plans for collaboration around research, teaching, and development of joint degree programmes over the next three years and beyond.

Central to the strategic alliance is the development of a Pan–European Institute, which aims to provide a framework for cross-disciplinary research projects, publications, joint masters degrees and co-supervision of PhD students. 

 

Events Archive

  • ‘The Trump Presidency: Implications for Europe’ roundtable 5 December 2016
  • ‘European perspectives on Brexit’ roundtable 12 December 2016

Contact Us

Dr Bryce Evans
Senior Lecturer in History
Department of History and Politics
Liverpool Hope University
L16 9JD
+44 (0)151 2913585

evansb1@hope.ac.uk

Visit my blog

Follow me on Twitter

 

Academic Committee Contacts:

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Mrs. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator                      

 

The Channel – working paper and blog series

The Institute welcomes blog articles and working papers for discussion on the website. To submit a piece click here 

Working Papers

Theresa May annonce la lettre de l’article 50 sera envoyée 29 mars

Par Bill Jones, ancien professeur de politique et histoire, Liverpool Hope

Publié le Mardi, 21 mars 2017

Commentaire d’expert

Bill Jones, ancien professeur de politique et histoire à L’Université de Liverpool Hope, réagit à l’annonce que l’article 50 sera déclenché le mercredi, 29 mars.

Theresa May Announces Article 50 letter to be sent 29th March

There were many who doubted this moment would actually arrive but now it just has. After the litany of ‘Brexit means Brexit’, legal appeals and an enabling bill to give May the legal authority, the key moment of triggering Britain’s separation from the EU is nigh. The letter applying for Article 50 will be sent by Theresa May next Wednesday, 29th March. Two years later, in March 2019 we will be out.

Nothing can now prevent an outcome which 48% of the population opposed, either slightly, or in many cases, really passionately. At the same time as announcing this decision, her spokesman also scotched the idea of a snap general election: ‘It’s not going to happen.’ That should provide some relief to the Labour Party at least.

But commentators can’t be wrong when they say that Mrs May, this slightly austere, and exceptionally cautious vicar’s daughter, has embarked on a gamble with her country’s future so huge and arguably so reckless it cannot in any way be expressed in financial terms. Her choice to pursue a ‘hard’ rather than ‘soft’ version of leaving- exiting not only the single market of 500 million people but also the Customs Union which keeps tariffs low and trade flowing to all points of this massive economic area-but she also seeks to leave the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

Huge amounts of energy have been expended arguing whether these decisions will open up a new, exciting and enriching new freedom to trade worldwide or leave the UK greatly impoverished and on its own. It will have abandoned an experiment in economic and political integration which has been the most successful the world has ever seen. And into the bargain Mrs May might well find that today’s historic decision will lead the smashing of the historic union of four nations as Nicola sturgeon uses Brexit to ramp up yet more support for Scottish independence referendum she will this time win.

The EU have already made clear they are ‘ready and waiting’ to begin the most complex series of negotiations which have ever been pursued in the history of the world. The aim will be to produce a draft deal which will be put to the 27 members of the European Council. It will then require the approval of at least 20 countries comprising 65% of the EU’s population before seeking the approval of the European Parliament.

Many believe two years will be insufficient to complete the deal- the recent trade deal between the EU and Canada, a much simpler affair, took over seven  years and some estimate Brexit will take up to ten. An extension to negotiations after two years can take place but only if all 27 countries agree. And with their national and in some cases regional parliaments also having a veto, a green light is by no means assured. Finally, if no agreement to extend talks is made than EU treaties will cease to apply to the UK. We’ll be on our own without the trade deals which  have brought us relative prosperity since we joined in 1972.

The cheery optimism of the Leave camp that EU countries, keen to continue trade with a major trade partner, now looks a little ragged when it’s obvious EU leaders are desperate to keep the EU project up and running and have no intention of allowing the UK to escape without significant harm from the quandary into which the Brexit vote has placed them. To do so would be to encourage other members to surrender to populist pressure and also apply for that famous Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. They have no intention of allowing the UK to emerge strengthened whilst they suffer a weakening.

  


 

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) 

Universitaires immigrants au « pays étranger pédagogique » - des facteurs qui influencent leur acculturation pédagogique

Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey.

Un bref aperçu

Un des effets de la mondialisation a été une augmentation du voyage transfrontalier des universitaires dans l’enseignement supérieur (HE).  On estime que, dans l’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni, environ 28 % des universitaires sont les non Britanniques (HEFCE, 2015).  Ces universitaires immigrants ont souvent « un habitus pédagogique » lié à leur expérience d’enseignement antérieure et aux environnements pédagogiques. Il pourrait ainsi engendrer « une dissonance pédagogique », crée par l’inadéquation entre les pratiques d’apprentissage/d’enseignement à lesquelles ces universitaires sont accoutumées et celles à lesquelles ils sont exposées dans leur nouveau contexte. Suivant la théorie d’acculturation de Berry (1997), nous estimons que toute dissonance conséquente peut conduire à la séparation, la marginalisation, l’assimilation ou l’intégration de ces universitaires dans leur nouvel environnement pédagogique.  À l’aide d’un questionnaire, l’étude sera basée sur les expériences pédagogiques des universitaires immigrants pendant les cinq premières années de leur enseignement dans les établissements d’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni (HEIs), suivi d’interviews avec certains des répondants pour acquérir une compréhension approfondie de la question. Il est attendu que les données nous permettront d’étudier des barrières dont ces universitaires immigrants pourraient percevoir dans le domaine de l’enseignement au Royaume-Uni, et comment ils font face à les stratégies de leurs instituts hôtes pour les acculturer dans leur nouveau milieu pédagogique. Ces résultats nous permettront d’identifier toute « dissonance pédagogique » à laquelle ces universitaires est confrontée pour mieux comprendre leurs besoins professionnels en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage. Ces activités de recherche seraient utiles pour des développeurs universitaires, la gestion supérieure et des universitaires natifs en aidant des universitaires immigrants à s’intégrer harmonieusement leurs pratiques pédagogiques dans « une internationalisation symbiotique » du processus d’enseignement-apprentissage.

(Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey. Cette étude est financée par SEDA)

 

Migrant Academics and Professional Learning Gains: Perspectives of the Native Academics

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) are working on this SRHE funded study.

 

Brief overview

Recently, the UK voted to exit the European Union (EU). This so-called ‘Brexit’ highlighted a perception that native workers are disadvantaged due to the presence of migrant workers. However, as the UK Higher Education (HE) has over a quarter (28%) migrant academics (HESA, 2016) from different educational and professional value systems, the British academic may gain a wide variety of professional knowledge through working with their migrant colleagues. The research aims to explore these professional learning (non-)gains of the British academic and how it particularly affects the nature of their pedagogical work. The research outcomes will aid universities’ senior management to plan appropriate training for engendering a synergistic environment to ensure a high teaching quality and student experience. The objective, therefore, is to identify these possible professional learning gains of British academics and through this recommend how these gains can maintain or improve the teaching quality and student experience.

 

 Les universitaires migrants et des résultats d’apprentissages professionnels : les perspectives des universitaires natifs

 

Un bref aperçu

Récemment le Royaume-Uni a voté pour quitter l’Union Européen (EU). Ce soi-disant « Brexit » a souligné une perception que les travailleurs natifs sont défavorisés du fait de la présence des travailleurs migrants.  Cependant, car l’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni (HE) possède plus d’un quart (28%) de universitaires migrants (HESA, 2016) issus de divers systèmes de valeurs, éducatifs et professionnels, l’universitaire britannique pourrait acquérir un large éventail de connaissance professionnelle en travaillant avec ses collègues migrants.  Cette recherche vise à explorer ces avantages (ou pas) de l’apprentissage professionnel de l’universitaire britannique et comment il touche particulièrement la nature de leur travail pédagogique. Les résultats des recherches aideront les dirigeants des universités à planifier une formation adaptée pour engendrer un environnement synergique afin d’assurer un haut niveau de qualité dans les domaines de l’enseignement et de l’expérience des étudiants. Donc l’objectif est de déterminer ces avantages possibles de l’apprentissage professionnel des universitaires britanniques et, ce faisant, de conseiller la façon dont ces avantages peuvent maintenir ou améliorer la qualité de l’enseignement et de l’expérience des étudiants.

(Dr Namrata Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein et Professeur Ian Kinchin, Université de Surrey)  Cette étude est financée par SRHE.

 

Immigrant academics in the pedagogic ‘foreign-land’: Factors influencing their pedagogic acculturation

Dr Namrata Rao along with Dr Anesa Hosein  (University of Surrey) are working on this SEDA funded study.

Brief overview

With globalisation there has been an increase in cross-border travel of academics within Higher Education (HE). It is estimated that in the UK HE around 28% of the academics are non-British (HEFCE, 2015). These immigrant academics often have a ‘pedagogical habitus’, related to their previous teaching experience and learning environments. This may result in a ‘pedagogic dissonance’ created by the mismatch between the learning-teaching practices these academics are accustomed to and the ones they are exposed to in their new context. Using Berry’s acculturation theory (1997), we contend that any consequent dissonance may lead to separation, marginalisation, assimilation or integration of these academics in their new pedagogic environment. Using a questionnaire, the study will draw on the pedagogical experiences of immigrant academics within the first five years of their teaching within UK HE institutions (HEIs), followed by interviews with some of these respondents for an in-depth understanding of the issue. It is anticipated that the data will help explore any barriers these immigrant academics may perceive in teaching in the UK and how they experience their host HEIs’ strategies to acculturate them into their new pedagogic milieu. Findings will help identify any ‘pedagogic dissonance’ these academics face to better understand their professional teaching and learning needs. The research would be of value to academic developers, senior management and native academics in helping meet the professional needs of the immigrant academics to successfully integrate their pedagogical practices in a ‘symbiotic internationalisation’ of the teaching-learning process

 

Migrant Academics and Professional Learning Gains: Perspectives of the Native Academics

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) are working on this SRHE funded study.

 

Brief overview

Recently, the UK voted to exit the European Union (EU). This so-called ‘Brexit’ highlighted a perception that native workers are disadvantaged due to the presence of migrant workers. However, as the UK Higher Education (HE) has over a quarter (28%) migrant academics (HESA, 2016) from different educational and professional value systems, the British academic may gain a wide variety of professional knowledge through working with their migrant colleagues. The research aims to explore these professional learning (non-)gains of the British academic and how it particularly affects the nature of their pedagogical work. The research outcomes will aid universities’ senior management to plan appropriate training for engendering a synergistic environment to ensure a high teaching quality and student experience. The objective, therefore, is to identify these possible professional learning gains of British academics and through this recommend how these gains can maintain or improve the teaching quality and student experience.



Dr Zaki Nahaboo, The rights and wrongs of the High Court ruling on triggering Article 50, (16 January 2017). 

Des arguments pour et contre la décision de la Haute Cour sur le déclenchement de « « « Article 50 »

La Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni décidera bientôt si le Parlement a son mot à dire au sujet de « Brexit ».  Les enjeux sont énormes, cependant, de toute façon, une partie criera victoire pour « le peuple ».

Les droits légaux de tous les habitants de Grande-Bretagne devenaient de plus en plus incertains. La position des ressortissants de l’UE qui habiteront dans un Grande Bretagne « post Brexit » reste encore ouverte. L’avenir de la législation européenne existante, par exemple le nombre maximum d’heures de travail et le droit d’être oublié en ligne, risque de ne pas perdurer une fois incorporés dans la législation nationale. Tandis que la loi de 1998 sur les droits de la personne était en partie une conséquence de la Convention européenne du Conseil de l'Europe sur les droits de l'homme (CEDH) et pas de l’UE, ses jours sont aussi comptés alors que l’évolution vers son abrogation prend de l’ampleur à cause du « Brexit ». Par conséquence, les demandeurs d’asile et des intervenants peuvent se retrouver rapidement avec des outils réduits pour rechercher la justice. La spéculation et la surveillance règnent à part égale.

Dissiper le brouillard de « Brexit » et trouver un moyen clair vers un régime potentiel des droits « post-Brexit » a suscité beaucoup d’intérêt par des comités spéciaux, des universitaires et la société civile.  Ces pistes d’enquête sont actuellement frustrées par le manque des plans du domaine public pour le départ de Grande Bretagne de l’UE. Pourtant même sans accéder aux subtilités des termes de la sortie proposés par Grande Bretagne, certains paramètres pour la compréhension des droits commencent à organiser des débats dominants. La décision de la Haute Cour sur « R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union[1] » et les reportages médiatiques ultérieures cristallisent les principales façons dont les droits sont encadrés et adoptés publiquement avant le départ officiel de Grande Bretagne de l’Union européenne. 

Dr Zaki Nahaboo

Clike here to view the full article: https://www.opendemocracy.net/zaki-nahaboo/rights-and-wrongs-of-high-court-ruling-on-triggering-article-50

[1] https://www.supremecourt.uk/cases/docs/uksc-2016-0196-judgment.pdf

 



 

Un américain en Europe : le colonialisme des États Unis dans The Talented Mr Ripley et Ripley’s Game

Dr Jacqui Miller, l’Université de Liverpool Hope.

Abstract :

En faisant une analyse comparative de deux romans Ripleiad  de Patricia Highsmith, « The Talented Mr Ripley » (1955) et « Ripley’s Game » (1974) et les deux interprétations cinématique de chacun, Plein Soleil/Purple Noon (René Clément, 1960) et The Talented Mr Ripley (Anthony Minghella, 1999), Der amerikanische Freund/The American Friend (Wim Wenders, 1977) et Ripley’s Game (Liliana Cavani, 2004), cet article examine la signification de l’Europe pour les américains et la culture populaire américaine pour les Européens. On tire la conclusion que l’attrait des États-Unis pour la « haute culture » européenne et le souhait européen pour des produits culturels américains servent de métaphore pour le colonialisme culturel, économique et politique d’Amérique, dès le début du dix-neuvième siècle, qui a accéléré après la deuxième guerre mondiale et se poursuivait dans l’ère de mondialisation post-soviétique.  Sous-jacent à cet argument est le thème récurrent de contrefaçon et d’identité volée.

 

An American in Europe: US colonialism in The Talented Mr Ripley and Ripley’s Game

Dr Jacqui Miller, Liverpool Hope University.

Abstract:

Making comparative analysis of two of Patricia Highsmith’s Ripleiad novels, ‘The Talented Mr Ripley’ (1955) and ‘Ripley’s Game’ (1974), and the pair of film interpretations, of each, Plein Soleil/Purple Noon (Renè Clement 1960) and The Talented Mr Ripley (Anthony Minghella 1999), Der amerikanische Freund/The American Friend (Wim Wenders 1977) and Ripley’s Game (Liliana Cavani 2004), this article examines the meaning of Europe for Americans and of American popular culture for Europeans. The conclusion is drawn that American attraction to European ‘high culture’ and European desire for American cultural commodities work as a metaphor for American cultural, economic and political colonialism, beginning in the nineteenth century, accelerating after World War II and continuing into the post-Soviet globalized era. Underpinning this argument is the recurrent theme of forgery and stolen identity.

 

« Pourquoi pas un cow-boy à Hambourg ? : Le nouveau cinéma allemand et la frontière culturelle germano-américaine »

Jacqui Miller, l’Université de Liverpool Hope, Royaume-Uni.

Abstract

Dans le film « Der Amerikanische Soldat/The American Soldier » (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1970), une prostitutée demande à Ricky, un gangster récemment revenu de la guerre au Vietnam, s’il est « un vrai Américain ». Il répond « Tout a commencé en Allemagne : il était une fois un petit garçon.  Il a traversé l’outre-Atlantique. »  Cet échange, à bien des égards, résume le rapport de l’après Deuxième Guerre Mondiale entre l’Allemagne et les États-Unis et sa représentation cinématique. En commençant par le « trummerfilme » [1], «Die Morder sind unter uns/The Murderers are among us» (Wolfgang Staudte, 1946), on pourrait soutenir que l’Allemagne n’avait plus aucune nationalité définie.  Son économie était endettée envers le plan Marshall. De la même façon, son identité culturelle devait être américanisée, et sa présence géographique et spatiale avait disparu dans les villes bombardées et la frontière artificielle imposée par la division est-ouest, en soi une métaphore pour la lutte pour le sens d’Allemagne.

Dans cet article j’explorerai des idées de l’américanisation culturelle et spatiale d’Allemagne dans le nouveau cinéma allemand de Fassbinder et Wim Wenders.  Les deux réalisateurs abordent ces problèmes par des références auto-réflectives au Hollywood, mais aussi par leur utilisation du paysage – la ville, la petite ville et la campagne collaborent avec l’identité traditionnelle perdue d’Allemagne, son amnésie d’après-guerre quant à l’époque nazie et sa collusion plus moderne avec la marchandisation américaine.  Dans le travail de Fassbinder, les personnages réfléchissent sur l’immobilisme d’Allemagne : « rien ne se passe en Allemagne » (Ricky dans The American Soldier). Donc le vide est rempli par l’objectivation des icônes tirés d’Hollywood, comme l’illustre la scène dans Liebe ist Kalter als der Tod/Love is Colder than Death (1969), où le trio de criminels, inspirés par Bonnie et Clyde, volent et ensuite posent avec des Ray-Bans.  Wenders utilise des images similaires, mais aussi il souligne la fugacité de la frontière culturelle et spatiale d’Allemagne, exprimée dans The American Friend (1975) par la question de Ricky « Pourquoi pas un cow-boy à  Hambourg »[2] et la manque désorientée des plans générales qui empêche le spectateur d’être certain si on est à Hambourg ou à New  York.



[1] Rubble films

[2] “What’s wrong with a cowboy in Hamburg?”

 

‘What’s wrong with a cowboy in Hamburg?’: New German Cinema and the German-American cultural frontier

Jacqui Miller, Liverpool Hope University, UK.

Abstract

In Der Ameriikanische Soldat/The American Soldier (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1970), a prostitute asks Ricky, a gangster, recently returned from fighting in Vietnam, if he is ‘a real American.’ He replies ‘It all began in Germany: Once upon a time there was a little boy. He flew across the big pond.’ In many ways, this exchange sums up Germany’s post-World War II relationship with the United States and its cinematic representation. Beginning with the trummerfilme (rubble film) Die Morder sind unter uns/ The Murderers Are among us (Wolfgang Staudte, 1946) it could be argued that Germany no longer had any definite nationality. Its economy was indebted to the Marshall Plan, its cultural identity was to be similarly Americanised, and its geographical and spatial self had disappeared in the bombed cities and the ‘artificial’ border imposed by the east-west divide, itself a metaphor for the struggle for Germany’s meaning.

This article will explore notions of Germany’s cultural and spatial Americanisation in the New German Cinema of Fassbinder and Wim Wenders. Both directors interrogate these issues through self-reflexive references to Hollywood, but also, though their use of landscape - the city, small town, and countryside, engage with Germany’s ‘lost’ ‘traditional’ identity, its post-war amnesia with regard to the Nazi era, and its more modern collusion with American commodification. In Fassbinder’s work, characters reflect upon Germany’s stasis: ‘nothing ever happens in Germany’ (Ricky in The American Soldier), and the void is filled by objectification of  Hollywood-derived icons exemplified by the scene in Liebe ist Kalter als der Tod/Love is Colder than Death (1969), when the trio of Bonnie and Clyde-inspired criminals steal, and then pose in, Ray-Bans. Wenders utilises similar images, but also foregrounds the ephemerality of Germany’s cultural and spatial border, articulated in The American Friend (1975) by Ripley’s question ‘What’s wrong with a cowboy in Hamburg’ and the disorienting lack of establishing shots preventing the spectator from being sure if they are in Hamburg or New York.

Overview

Welcome from the Directors

Bryce Evans Lille Institute 
Dr Ioannis Panoussis

In the current global climate, the fostering of cross-border academic collaboration is important.

That is why a firm Anglo-French academic alliance is so unusual and significant.

In 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille decided to form a strategic alliance around teaching and research. Central to this alliance is the development of a European Institute. This body aims to provide a framework for cross-disciplinary research projects, publications, joint masters degrees and co-supervision of PhD students.

This website provides information on how the European Institute functions, what we are achieving together and what we will achieve in the future.

History teaches us that European cooperation is essential in achieving peace, growth and progress; it is in this spirit that the Institut Européen/European Institute operates and in this spirit that we as educators, students and citizens thrive.

Dr Bryce Evans and Dr Ioannis Panoussis

Directors of the Institut Européen/European Institute

 

Aims of the partnership

In June 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille signed a strategic roadmap detailing their plans for joint collaboration around research, teaching, and development of joint degree programmes to 2019 and beyond.  

The Roadmap for Strategic Alliance was signed by the two Rectors, Professor Gerald Pillay and Professor Pierre Giorgini in Lille. The two universities have already embarked on a student and staff exchange programme. 

Aims of the Institute 

  • Supporting bilateral staff collaboration (Erasmus exchange and research)
  • Fostering student exchange
  • Developing research collaboration
  • Promoting public engagement
  • Building towards joint degree programmes where appropriate

The investment in this partnership by both universities steps up strategic research collaboration and aims to have a significant impact in the UK, France and across Europe.

The Institute is embedded within eight academic projects involving a wide array of disciplines - English language and literature, business, law, environmental studies, politics and international relations, education, health sciences, psychology, theology and philosophy.

Fostering new, intellectually and culturally enriching learning opportunities for students is high on the agenda of both universities. It is hoped that studying abroad, gaining work experience and volunteering will be significantly enhanced by the new agreement.

People and Places

Organisational structure

The Institute is directed by Dr Bryce Evans (Liverpool Hope) and Dr Ioannis Panoussis (Lille).

There is a strategic committee composed of academics which meets biennially. 

There are a number of interdisciplinary working groups based around the following areas:

  • Future of Europe (law, politics, economics, sociology)
  • Enterprise and sustainability (business, marketing, economics)
  • Teaching innovation (Education)
  • Health care, society and policy (social work, policy studies, psychology)
  • Literature and popular culture (literature, media)
  • Hermeneutics (theology, philosophy)
  • Ecology and environment (geography, ecology)

 

Academic Committee Members 

Dr. Bryce Evans Co-director

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Ms. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator

 

More about Lille

For more information about Lille, visit the Lonely Planet website.

For more information about l’Université Catholique de Lille, please visit their website.

 

More about Liverpool

For more information about Liverpool, visit the Lonely Planet website.

Events 2017

‌The Institute oversees and facilitates cooperation in the following areas:

  • Research collaboration
  • Teaching collaboration
  • Student exchanges
  • Joint Masters programmes

 

PhD scholarships programme

For more information about the PhD scholarships programmes, download the following PDFs:

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Information Leaflet

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Personal Statement Guidance Notes

 

Europe Day annual lecture

The Institute holds an annual distinguished lecture on Europe Day (on or around 9 May).

 

Annual conference

There is an annual themed conference featuring academics from both universities and other European institutions.

 

Upcoming Events

28 Feb to 3 March 2017
Liverpool Hope University students take a Erasmus taster trip to Lille

Guest Lecture Series 2017

 
8th March 2017 Patricia Connell delivers a lecture on the French Diaspora and Brexit
w/c Monday 20 March 2017  Address by Matt Kelly, editor New European newspaper
Monday 27th March 2017 Roundtable: 'Brexit and Local EU Nationals' 
The European Institute welcomes you to a discussion featuring a selection of the city's Honorary Consuls, followed by a reception.
 
Featuring 
Viorel Raducanescu, Consulate of Romania and President of the Consular Corps
Philip Daniel, Consulate of France
Date TBC Address by Christophe Premat - Deputy for French residents overseas
Date TBC  Address by Mark Durcan, MP (SDLP - Foyle) member of the UK Brexit Committee

Conferences 2017

 
8 May Europe Day  Keynote Lecture - Axelle Lemaire, French Minister of State for the Digital Sector and Innovation 

 

Inaugural distinguished Guest Lecture 2017 - Brexit and the French ‌Diaspora

 

For the inaugural distinguished guest lecture of its 2017 series, and to mark International Women's Day, the European Institute at Liverpool Hope University hosted Brexit and the French Diaspora, a reception followed by a talk by Mrs Patricia Connell, Délégué Consulaire.
 
Mrs Connell addressed the phrase "Brexit means Brexit", asking what does it really mean? She went on to explain how Brexit is already affecting the 3.3 million Europeans living here and the 1.5 million British citizens living in the EU.

Patricia Connell, an elected consular delegate who represents the French community in the UK, addressed these questions as well as talking about her life and work in the UK. A centre-right candidate (UDI) in the French parliamentary elections in June this year, her career has been spent in marketing and communications, with senior roles in both global manufacturing groups and in pan-European agencies. She has been actively engaged in the promotion of French companies, products and charitable associations for the last 20 years and is also currently the CEO of an bi-lingual online magazine for Francophones and Francophiles. In response to the uncertainty created for the French community by the Brexit vote she has organised meetings across the UK and Ireland to offer practical help and assistance to her fellow French citizens.

The lecture was attended by staff, students and the public; before the address Mrs Connell was welcomed to Hope by Vice Chancellor and Rector Professor Gerald Pillay.

 

Liverpool Hope University Erasmus trip to l’Université Catholique de Lille 28th February – 3rd March 2017 

Click here to listen to LHU and L'UCL students discussing life at Liverpool Hope      

 

Erasmus exchange sees Professor Galina Paramei teach at l'Université Catholique de Lille

Psychology Professor Galina Paramei delivered a series of lectures during a recent Erasmus exchange trip to l'Université Catholique de Lille.

The exchange was arranged under the Teaching Mobility Scheme established between the Departments of Psychology at both institutions.

Professor Paramei delivered three lectures on the Bilingual Mind, Research Methods: Experimental Design in Psychological Studies and the Bilingual Mind and Brain.

She said: “The highlight of my teaching experience was the high attendance rate and the genuine interest and engagement of the students. In particular, my Research Methods lecture that took place between 8-10 am, was attended by almost all students of the first year – despite the early hour. Also, I was told that many of the students are not very proficient in English, but their attention during the two hours was exceptional.”

As well as delivering teaching sessions, Professor Paramei used the trip to familiarise herself with the Lille Psychology Department’s curriculum and explored the academic research specialisms for potential future collaborations.

Speaking about the partnership between Liverpool Hope and Lille, Professor Paramei said: “The Department in Lille has expertise in Work Psychology, which - in teaching - could complement/be included in our curriculum in Applied Psychology. In research, I could envisage a collaboration between Dr Schoenenberger, who predominantly pursues qualitative research, with a new member of Hope’s Psychology team Dr Kim Gordon.

“Another potentially promising link is in Clinical Neuropsychology, with Dr Bruno Lenne, a neuropsychologist who uses EEG, works in a neurological hospital, and whose research interests are in clinical studies, including multiple sclerosis and addiction.”

Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille recently signed a strategic roadmap detailing plans for collaboration around research, teaching, and development of joint degree programmes over the next three years and beyond.

Central to the strategic alliance is the development of a Pan–European Institute, which aims to provide a framework for cross-disciplinary research projects, publications, joint masters degrees and co-supervision of PhD students. 

 

Events Archive

  • ‘The Trump Presidency: Implications for Europe’ roundtable 5 December 2016
  • ‘European perspectives on Brexit’ roundtable 12 December 2016

Contact Us

Dr Bryce Evans
Senior Lecturer in History
Department of History and Politics
Liverpool Hope University
L16 9JD
+44 (0)151 2913585

evansb1@hope.ac.uk

Visit my blog

Follow me on Twitter

 

Academic Committee Contacts:

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Mrs. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator                      

 

The Channel – working paper and blog series

The Institute welcomes blog articles and working papers for discussion on the website. To submit a piece click here 

Working Papers

Theresa May annonce la lettre de l’article 50 sera envoyée 29 mars

Par Bill Jones, ancien professeur de politique et histoire, Liverpool Hope

Publié le Mardi, 21 mars 2017

Commentaire d’expert

Bill Jones, ancien professeur de politique et histoire à L’Université de Liverpool Hope, réagit à l’annonce que l’article 50 sera déclenché le mercredi, 29 mars.

Theresa May Announces Article 50 letter to be sent 29th March

There were many who doubted this moment would actually arrive but now it just has. After the litany of ‘Brexit means Brexit’, legal appeals and an enabling bill to give May the legal authority, the key moment of triggering Britain’s separation from the EU is nigh. The letter applying for Article 50 will be sent by Theresa May next Wednesday, 29th March. Two years later, in March 2019 we will be out.

Nothing can now prevent an outcome which 48% of the population opposed, either slightly, or in many cases, really passionately. At the same time as announcing this decision, her spokesman also scotched the idea of a snap general election: ‘It’s not going to happen.’ That should provide some relief to the Labour Party at least.

But commentators can’t be wrong when they say that Mrs May, this slightly austere, and exceptionally cautious vicar’s daughter, has embarked on a gamble with her country’s future so huge and arguably so reckless it cannot in any way be expressed in financial terms. Her choice to pursue a ‘hard’ rather than ‘soft’ version of leaving- exiting not only the single market of 500 million people but also the Customs Union which keeps tariffs low and trade flowing to all points of this massive economic area-but she also seeks to leave the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

Huge amounts of energy have been expended arguing whether these decisions will open up a new, exciting and enriching new freedom to trade worldwide or leave the UK greatly impoverished and on its own. It will have abandoned an experiment in economic and political integration which has been the most successful the world has ever seen. And into the bargain Mrs May might well find that today’s historic decision will lead the smashing of the historic union of four nations as Nicola sturgeon uses Brexit to ramp up yet more support for Scottish independence referendum she will this time win.

The EU have already made clear they are ‘ready and waiting’ to begin the most complex series of negotiations which have ever been pursued in the history of the world. The aim will be to produce a draft deal which will be put to the 27 members of the European Council. It will then require the approval of at least 20 countries comprising 65% of the EU’s population before seeking the approval of the European Parliament.

Many believe two years will be insufficient to complete the deal- the recent trade deal between the EU and Canada, a much simpler affair, took over seven  years and some estimate Brexit will take up to ten. An extension to negotiations after two years can take place but only if all 27 countries agree. And with their national and in some cases regional parliaments also having a veto, a green light is by no means assured. Finally, if no agreement to extend talks is made than EU treaties will cease to apply to the UK. We’ll be on our own without the trade deals which  have brought us relative prosperity since we joined in 1972.

The cheery optimism of the Leave camp that EU countries, keen to continue trade with a major trade partner, now looks a little ragged when it’s obvious EU leaders are desperate to keep the EU project up and running and have no intention of allowing the UK to escape without significant harm from the quandary into which the Brexit vote has placed them. To do so would be to encourage other members to surrender to populist pressure and also apply for that famous Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. They have no intention of allowing the UK to emerge strengthened whilst they suffer a weakening.

  


 

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) 

Universitaires immigrants au « pays étranger pédagogique » - des facteurs qui influencent leur acculturation pédagogique

Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey.

Un bref aperçu

Un des effets de la mondialisation a été une augmentation du voyage transfrontalier des universitaires dans l’enseignement supérieur (HE).  On estime que, dans l’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni, environ 28 % des universitaires sont les non Britanniques (HEFCE, 2015).  Ces universitaires immigrants ont souvent « un habitus pédagogique » lié à leur expérience d’enseignement antérieure et aux environnements pédagogiques. Il pourrait ainsi engendrer « une dissonance pédagogique », crée par l’inadéquation entre les pratiques d’apprentissage/d’enseignement à lesquelles ces universitaires sont accoutumées et celles à lesquelles ils sont exposées dans leur nouveau contexte. Suivant la théorie d’acculturation de Berry (1997), nous estimons que toute dissonance conséquente peut conduire à la séparation, la marginalisation, l’assimilation ou l’intégration de ces universitaires dans leur nouvel environnement pédagogique.  À l’aide d’un questionnaire, l’étude sera basée sur les expériences pédagogiques des universitaires immigrants pendant les cinq premières années de leur enseignement dans les établissements d’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni (HEIs), suivi d’interviews avec certains des répondants pour acquérir une compréhension approfondie de la question. Il est attendu que les données nous permettront d’étudier des barrières dont ces universitaires immigrants pourraient percevoir dans le domaine de l’enseignement au Royaume-Uni, et comment ils font face à les stratégies de leurs instituts hôtes pour les acculturer dans leur nouveau milieu pédagogique. Ces résultats nous permettront d’identifier toute « dissonance pédagogique » à laquelle ces universitaires est confrontée pour mieux comprendre leurs besoins professionnels en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage. Ces activités de recherche seraient utiles pour des développeurs universitaires, la gestion supérieure et des universitaires natifs en aidant des universitaires immigrants à s’intégrer harmonieusement leurs pratiques pédagogiques dans « une internationalisation symbiotique » du processus d’enseignement-apprentissage.

(Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey. Cette étude est financée par SEDA)

 

Migrant Academics and Professional Learning Gains: Perspectives of the Native Academics

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) are working on this SRHE funded study.

 

Brief overview

Recently, the UK voted to exit the European Union (EU). This so-called ‘Brexit’ highlighted a perception that native workers are disadvantaged due to the presence of migrant workers. However, as the UK Higher Education (HE) has over a quarter (28%) migrant academics (HESA, 2016) from different educational and professional value systems, the British academic may gain a wide variety of professional knowledge through working with their migrant colleagues. The research aims to explore these professional learning (non-)gains of the British academic and how it particularly affects the nature of their pedagogical work. The research outcomes will aid universities’ senior management to plan appropriate training for engendering a synergistic environment to ensure a high teaching quality and student experience. The objective, therefore, is to identify these possible professional learning gains of British academics and through this recommend how these gains can maintain or improve the teaching quality and student experience.

 

 Les universitaires migrants et des résultats d’apprentissages professionnels : les perspectives des universitaires natifs

 

Un bref aperçu

Récemment le Royaume-Uni a voté pour quitter l’Union Européen (EU). Ce soi-disant « Brexit » a souligné une perception que les travailleurs natifs sont défavorisés du fait de la présence des travailleurs migrants.  Cependant, car l’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni (HE) possède plus d’un quart (28%) de universitaires migrants (HESA, 2016) issus de divers systèmes de valeurs, éducatifs et professionnels, l’universitaire britannique pourrait acquérir un large éventail de connaissance professionnelle en travaillant avec ses collègues migrants.  Cette recherche vise à explorer ces avantages (ou pas) de l’apprentissage professionnel de l’universitaire britannique et comment il touche particulièrement la nature de leur travail pédagogique. Les résultats des recherches aideront les dirigeants des universités à planifier une formation adaptée pour engendrer un environnement synergique afin d’assurer un haut niveau de qualité dans les domaines de l’enseignement et de l’expérience des étudiants. Donc l’objectif est de déterminer ces avantages possibles de l’apprentissage professionnel des universitaires britanniques et, ce faisant, de conseiller la façon dont ces avantages peuvent maintenir ou améliorer la qualité de l’enseignement et de l’expérience des étudiants.

(Dr Namrata Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein et Professeur Ian Kinchin, Université de Surrey)  Cette étude est financée par SRHE.

 

Immigrant academics in the pedagogic ‘foreign-land’: Factors influencing their pedagogic acculturation

Dr Namrata Rao along with Dr Anesa Hosein  (University of Surrey) are working on this SEDA funded study.

Brief overview

With globalisation there has been an increase in cross-border travel of academics within Higher Education (HE). It is estimated that in the UK HE around 28% of the academics are non-British (HEFCE, 2015). These immigrant academics often have a ‘pedagogical habitus’, related to their previous teaching experience and learning environments. This may result in a ‘pedagogic dissonance’ created by the mismatch between the learning-teaching practices these academics are accustomed to and the ones they are exposed to in their new context. Using Berry’s acculturation theory (1997), we contend that any consequent dissonance may lead to separation, marginalisation, assimilation or integration of these academics in their new pedagogic environment. Using a questionnaire, the study will draw on the pedagogical experiences of immigrant academics within the first five years of their teaching within UK HE institutions (HEIs), followed by interviews with some of these respondents for an in-depth understanding of the issue. It is anticipated that the data will help explore any barriers these immigrant academics may perceive in teaching in the UK and how they experience their host HEIs’ strategies to acculturate them into their new pedagogic milieu. Findings will help identify any ‘pedagogic dissonance’ these academics face to better understand their professional teaching and learning needs. The research would be of value to academic developers, senior management and native academics in helping meet the professional needs of the immigrant academics to successfully integrate their pedagogical practices in a ‘symbiotic internationalisation’ of the teaching-learning process

 

Migrant Academics and Professional Learning Gains: Perspectives of the Native Academics

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) are working on this SRHE funded study.

 

Brief overview

Recently, the UK voted to exit the European Union (EU). This so-called ‘Brexit’ highlighted a perception that native workers are disadvantaged due to the presence of migrant workers. However, as the UK Higher Education (HE) has over a quarter (28%) migrant academics (HESA, 2016) from different educational and professional value systems, the British academic may gain a wide variety of professional knowledge through working with their migrant colleagues. The research aims to explore these professional learning (non-)gains of the British academic and how it particularly affects the nature of their pedagogical work. The research outcomes will aid universities’ senior management to plan appropriate training for engendering a synergistic environment to ensure a high teaching quality and student experience. The objective, therefore, is to identify these possible professional learning gains of British academics and through this recommend how these gains can maintain or improve the teaching quality and student experience.



Dr Zaki Nahaboo, The rights and wrongs of the High Court ruling on triggering Article 50, (16 January 2017). 

Des arguments pour et contre la décision de la Haute Cour sur le déclenchement de « « « Article 50 »

La Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni décidera bientôt si le Parlement a son mot à dire au sujet de « Brexit ».  Les enjeux sont énormes, cependant, de toute façon, une partie criera victoire pour « le peuple ».

Les droits légaux de tous les habitants de Grande-Bretagne devenaient de plus en plus incertains. La position des ressortissants de l’UE qui habiteront dans un Grande Bretagne « post Brexit » reste encore ouverte. L’avenir de la législation européenne existante, par exemple le nombre maximum d’heures de travail et le droit d’être oublié en ligne, risque de ne pas perdurer une fois incorporés dans la législation nationale. Tandis que la loi de 1998 sur les droits de la personne était en partie une conséquence de la Convention européenne du Conseil de l'Europe sur les droits de l'homme (CEDH) et pas de l’UE, ses jours sont aussi comptés alors que l’évolution vers son abrogation prend de l’ampleur à cause du « Brexit ». Par conséquence, les demandeurs d’asile et des intervenants peuvent se retrouver rapidement avec des outils réduits pour rechercher la justice. La spéculation et la surveillance règnent à part égale.

Dissiper le brouillard de « Brexit » et trouver un moyen clair vers un régime potentiel des droits « post-Brexit » a suscité beaucoup d’intérêt par des comités spéciaux, des universitaires et la société civile.  Ces pistes d’enquête sont actuellement frustrées par le manque des plans du domaine public pour le départ de Grande Bretagne de l’UE. Pourtant même sans accéder aux subtilités des termes de la sortie proposés par Grande Bretagne, certains paramètres pour la compréhension des droits commencent à organiser des débats dominants. La décision de la Haute Cour sur « R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union[1] » et les reportages médiatiques ultérieures cristallisent les principales façons dont les droits sont encadrés et adoptés publiquement avant le départ officiel de Grande Bretagne de l’Union européenne. 

Dr Zaki Nahaboo

Clike here to view the full article: https://www.opendemocracy.net/zaki-nahaboo/rights-and-wrongs-of-high-court-ruling-on-triggering-article-50

[1] https://www.supremecourt.uk/cases/docs/uksc-2016-0196-judgment.pdf

 



 

Un américain en Europe : le colonialisme des États Unis dans The Talented Mr Ripley et Ripley’s Game

Dr Jacqui Miller, l’Université de Liverpool Hope.

Abstract :

En faisant une analyse comparative de deux romans Ripleiad  de Patricia Highsmith, « The Talented Mr Ripley » (1955) et « Ripley’s Game » (1974) et les deux interprétations cinématique de chacun, Plein Soleil/Purple Noon (René Clément, 1960) et The Talented Mr Ripley (Anthony Minghella, 1999), Der amerikanische Freund/The American Friend (Wim Wenders, 1977) et Ripley’s Game (Liliana Cavani, 2004), cet article examine la signification de l’Europe pour les américains et la culture populaire américaine pour les Européens. On tire la conclusion que l’attrait des États-Unis pour la « haute culture » européenne et le souhait européen pour des produits culturels américains servent de métaphore pour le colonialisme culturel, économique et politique d’Amérique, dès le début du dix-neuvième siècle, qui a accéléré après la deuxième guerre mondiale et se poursuivait dans l’ère de mondialisation post-soviétique.  Sous-jacent à cet argument est le thème récurrent de contrefaçon et d’identité volée.

 

An American in Europe: US colonialism in The Talented Mr Ripley and Ripley’s Game

Dr Jacqui Miller, Liverpool Hope University.

Abstract:

Making comparative analysis of two of Patricia Highsmith’s Ripleiad novels, ‘The Talented Mr Ripley’ (1955) and ‘Ripley’s Game’ (1974), and the pair of film interpretations, of each, Plein Soleil/Purple Noon (Renè Clement 1960) and The Talented Mr Ripley (Anthony Minghella 1999), Der amerikanische Freund/The American Friend (Wim Wenders 1977) and Ripley’s Game (Liliana Cavani 2004), this article examines the meaning of Europe for Americans and of American popular culture for Europeans. The conclusion is drawn that American attraction to European ‘high culture’ and European desire for American cultural commodities work as a metaphor for American cultural, economic and political colonialism, beginning in the nineteenth century, accelerating after World War II and continuing into the post-Soviet globalized era. Underpinning this argument is the recurrent theme of forgery and stolen identity.

 

« Pourquoi pas un cow-boy à Hambourg ? : Le nouveau cinéma allemand et la frontière culturelle germano-américaine »

Jacqui Miller, l’Université de Liverpool Hope, Royaume-Uni.

Abstract

Dans le film « Der Amerikanische Soldat/The American Soldier » (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1970), une prostitutée demande à Ricky, un gangster récemment revenu de la guerre au Vietnam, s’il est « un vrai Américain ». Il répond « Tout a commencé en Allemagne : il était une fois un petit garçon.  Il a traversé l’outre-Atlantique. »  Cet échange, à bien des égards, résume le rapport de l’après Deuxième Guerre Mondiale entre l’Allemagne et les États-Unis et sa représentation cinématique. En commençant par le « trummerfilme » [1], «Die Morder sind unter uns/The Murderers are among us» (Wolfgang Staudte, 1946), on pourrait soutenir que l’Allemagne n’avait plus aucune nationalité définie.  Son économie était endettée envers le plan Marshall. De la même façon, son identité culturelle devait être américanisée, et sa présence géographique et spatiale avait disparu dans les villes bombardées et la frontière artificielle imposée par la division est-ouest, en soi une métaphore pour la lutte pour le sens d’Allemagne.

Dans cet article j’explorerai des idées de l’américanisation culturelle et spatiale d’Allemagne dans le nouveau cinéma allemand de Fassbinder et Wim Wenders.  Les deux réalisateurs abordent ces problèmes par des références auto-réflectives au Hollywood, mais aussi par leur utilisation du paysage – la ville, la petite ville et la campagne collaborent avec l’identité traditionnelle perdue d’Allemagne, son amnésie d’après-guerre quant à l’époque nazie et sa collusion plus moderne avec la marchandisation américaine.  Dans le travail de Fassbinder, les personnages réfléchissent sur l’immobilisme d’Allemagne : « rien ne se passe en Allemagne » (Ricky dans The American Soldier). Donc le vide est rempli par l’objectivation des icônes tirés d’Hollywood, comme l’illustre la scène dans Liebe ist Kalter als der Tod/Love is Colder than Death (1969), où le trio de criminels, inspirés par Bonnie et Clyde, volent et ensuite posent avec des Ray-Bans.  Wenders utilise des images similaires, mais aussi il souligne la fugacité de la frontière culturelle et spatiale d’Allemagne, exprimée dans The American Friend (1975) par la question de Ricky « Pourquoi pas un cow-boy à  Hambourg »[2] et la manque désorientée des plans générales qui empêche le spectateur d’être certain si on est à Hambourg ou à New  York.



[1] Rubble films

[2] “What’s wrong with a cowboy in Hamburg?”

 

‘What’s wrong with a cowboy in Hamburg?’: New German Cinema and the German-American cultural frontier

Jacqui Miller, Liverpool Hope University, UK.

Abstract

In Der Ameriikanische Soldat/The American Soldier (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1970), a prostitute asks Ricky, a gangster, recently returned from fighting in Vietnam, if he is ‘a real American.’ He replies ‘It all began in Germany: Once upon a time there was a little boy. He flew across the big pond.’ In many ways, this exchange sums up Germany’s post-World War II relationship with the United States and its cinematic representation. Beginning with the trummerfilme (rubble film) Die Morder sind unter uns/ The Murderers Are among us (Wolfgang Staudte, 1946) it could be argued that Germany no longer had any definite nationality. Its economy was indebted to the Marshall Plan, its cultural identity was to be similarly Americanised, and its geographical and spatial self had disappeared in the bombed cities and the ‘artificial’ border imposed by the east-west divide, itself a metaphor for the struggle for Germany’s meaning.

This article will explore notions of Germany’s cultural and spatial Americanisation in the New German Cinema of Fassbinder and Wim Wenders. Both directors interrogate these issues through self-reflexive references to Hollywood, but also, though their use of landscape - the city, small town, and countryside, engage with Germany’s ‘lost’ ‘traditional’ identity, its post-war amnesia with regard to the Nazi era, and its more modern collusion with American commodification. In Fassbinder’s work, characters reflect upon Germany’s stasis: ‘nothing ever happens in Germany’ (Ricky in The American Soldier), and the void is filled by objectification of  Hollywood-derived icons exemplified by the scene in Liebe ist Kalter als der Tod/Love is Colder than Death (1969), when the trio of Bonnie and Clyde-inspired criminals steal, and then pose in, Ray-Bans. Wenders utilises similar images, but also foregrounds the ephemerality of Germany’s cultural and spatial border, articulated in The American Friend (1975) by Ripley’s question ‘What’s wrong with a cowboy in Hamburg’ and the disorienting lack of establishing shots preventing the spectator from being sure if they are in Hamburg or New York.