Find Your Course
Liverpool Hope Logo

Faculty of Arts and Humanities

Overview

Welcome from the Directors

Bryce Evans Lille Institute Dr Ioannis Panoussis

In the current global climate, the fostering of cross-border academic collaboration is important.

That is why a firm Anglo-French academic alliance is so unusual and significant.

In 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille decided to form a strategic alliance around teaching and research. Central to this alliance is the development of a European Institute. This body aims to provide a framework for cross-disciplinary research projects, publications, joint masters degrees and co-supervision of PhD students.

This website provides information on how the European Institute functions, what we are achieving together and what we will achieve in the future.

History teaches us that European cooperation is essential in achieving peace, growth and progress; it is in this spirit that the Institut Européen/European Institute operates and in this spirit that we as educators, students and citizens thrive.

Dr Bryce Evans and Dr Ioannis Panoussis

Directors of the Institut Européen/European Institute

 

Aims of the partnership

In June 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille signed a strategic roadmap detailing their plans for joint collaboration around research, teaching, and development of joint degree programmes to 2019 and beyond.  

The Roadmap for Strategic Alliance was signed by the two Rectors, Professor Gerald Pillay and Professor Pierre Giorgini in Lille. The two universities have already embarked on a student and staff exchange programme. 

Aims of the Institute 

  • Supporting bilateral staff collaboration (Erasmus exchange and research)
  • Fostering student exchange
  • Developing research collaboration
  • Promoting public engagement
  • Building towards joint degree programmes where appropriate

The investment in this partnership by both universities steps up strategic research collaboration and aims to have a significant impact in the UK, France and across Europe.

The Institute is embedded within eight academic projects involving a wide array of disciplines - English language and literature, business, law, environmental studies, politics and international relations, education, health sciences, psychology, theology and philosophy.

Fostering new, intellectually and culturally enriching learning opportunities for students is high on the agenda of both universities. It is hoped that studying abroad, gaining work experience and volunteering will be significantly enhanced by the new agreement.

People and Places

Organisational structure

The Institute is directed by Dr Bryce Evans (Liverpool Hope) and Dr Ioannis Panoussis (Lille).

There is a strategic committee composed of academics which meets biennially. 

There are a number of interdisciplinary working groups based around the following areas:

  • Future of Europe (law, politics, economics, sociology)
  • Enterprise and sustainability (business, marketing, economics)
  • Teaching innovation (Education)
  • Health care, society and policy (social work, policy studies, psychology)
  • Literature and popular culture (literature, media)
  • Hermeneutics (theology, philosophy)
  • Ecology and environment (geography, ecology)

 

Academic Committee Members 

Dr. Bryce Evans Co-director

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Ms. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator

 

 

More about Lille

For more information about Lille, visit the Lonely Planet website.

For more information about l’Université Catholique de Lille, please visit their website.

 

More about Liverpool

For more information about Liverpool, visit the Lonely Planet website.

Events 2017

The Institute oversees and facilitates cooperation in the following areas:

  • Research collaboration
  • Teaching collaboration
  • Student exchanges
  • Joint Masters programmes

 

PhD scholarships programme

For more information about the PhD scholarships programmes, download the following PDFs:

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Information Leaflet

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Personal Statement Guidance Notes

 

Europe Day annual lecture

The Institute holds an annual distinguished lecture on Europe Day (on or around 9 May).

 

Annual conference

There is an annual themed conference featuring academics from both universities and other European institutions.

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 

 

28 Feb to 3 March 2017
Liverpool Hope University students take a Erasmus taster trip to Lille
Guest Lecture Series 2017  
8th March 2017 Patricia Connell delivers a lecture on the French Diaspora and Brexit
w/c Monday 20 March 2017  Address by Matt Kelly, editor New European newspaper
Date TBC Address by Christophe Premat - Deputy for French residents overseas
Date TBC  Address by Mark Durcan, MP (SDLP - Foyle) member of the UK Brexit Committee
Conferences 2017  
8 May Europe Day  Keynote Lecture - Axelle Lemaire, French Minister of State for the Digital Secor and Innovation 

 

Events Archive

  • ‘The Trump Presidency: Implications for Europe’ roundtable 5 December 2016
  • ‘European perspectives on Brexit’ roundtable 12 December 2016

Contact Us

Dr Bryce Evans
Senior Lecturer in History
Department of History and Politics
Liverpool Hope University
L16 9JD
+44 (0)151 2913585

evansb1@hope.ac.uk

Visit my blog

Follow me on Twitter

 

 Academic Committee Contacts:

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Mrs. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator                      

 

The Channel – working paper and blog series

The Institute welcomes blog articles and working papers for discussion on the website. To submit a piece click here 

Working Papers

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) 

Universitaires immigrants au « pays étranger pédagogique » - des facteurs qui influencent leur acculturation pédagogique

 

Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey.

Un bref aperçu

Un des effets de la mondialisation a été une augmentation du voyage transfrontalier des universitaires dans l’enseignement supérieur (HE).  On estime que, dans l’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni, environ 28 % des universitaires sont les non Britanniques (HEFCE, 2015).  Ces universitaires immigrants ont souvent « un habitus pédagogique » lié à leur expérience d’enseignement antérieure et aux environnements pédagogiques. Il pourrait ainsi engendrer « une dissonance pédagogique », crée par l’inadéquation entre les pratiques d’apprentissage/d’enseignement à lesquelles ces universitaires sont accoutumées et celles à lesquelles ils sont exposées dans leur nouveau contexte. Suivant la théorie d’acculturation de Berry (1997), nous estimons que toute dissonance conséquente peut conduire à la séparation, la marginalisation, l’assimilation ou l’intégration de ces universitaires dans leur nouvel environnement pédagogique.  À l’aide d’un questionnaire, l’étude sera basée sur les expériences pédagogiques des universitaires immigrants pendant les cinq premières années de leur enseignement dans les établissements d’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni (HEIs), suivi d’interviews avec certains des répondants pour acquérir une compréhension approfondie de la question. Il est attendu que les données nous permettront d’étudier des barrières dont ces universitaires immigrants pourraient percevoir dans le domaine de l’enseignement au Royaume-Uni, et comment ils font face à les stratégies de leurs instituts hôtes pour les acculturer dans leur nouveau milieu pédagogique. Ces résultats nous permettront d’identifier toute « dissonance pédagogique » à laquelle ces universitaires est confrontée pour mieux comprendre leurs besoins professionnels en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage. Ces activités de recherche seraient utiles pour des développeurs universitaires, la gestion supérieure et des universitaires natifs en aidant des universitaires immigrants à s’intégrer harmonieusement leurs pratiques pédagogiques dans « une internationalisation symbiotique » du processus d’enseignement-apprentissage.

(Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey. Cette étude est financée par SEDA)

 



 

 

Immigrant academics in the pedagogic ‘foreign-land’: Factors influencing their pedagogic acculturation

 

Dr Namrata Rao along with Dr Anesa Hosein  (University of Surrey) are working on this SEDA funded study.

 

Brief overview

With globalisation there has been an increase in cross-border travel of academics within Higher Education (HE). It is estimated that in the UK HE around 28% of the academics are non-British (HEFCE, 2015). These immigrant academics often have a ‘pedagogical habitus’, related to their previous teaching experience and learning environments. This may result in a ‘pedagogic dissonance’ created by the mismatch between the learning-teaching practices these academics are accustomed to and the ones they are exposed to in their new context. Using Berry’s acculturation theory (1997), we contend that any consequent dissonance may lead to separation, marginalisation, assimilation or integration of these academics in their new pedagogic environment. Using a questionnaire, the study will draw on the pedagogical experiences of immigrant academics within the first five years of their teaching within UK HE institutions (HEIs), followed by interviews with some of these respondents for an in-depth understanding of the issue. It is anticipated that the data will help explore any barriers these immigrant academics may perceive in teaching in the UK and how they experience their host HEIs’ strategies to acculturate them into their new pedagogic milieu. Findings will help identify any ‘pedagogic dissonance’ these academics face to better understand their professional teaching and learning needs. The research would be of value to academic developers, senior management and native academics in helping meet the professional needs of the immigrant academics to successfully integrate their pedagogical practices in a ‘symbiotic internationalisation’ of the teaching-learning process.

________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Migrant Academics and Professional Learning Gains: Perspectives of the Native Academics

 

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) are working on this SRHE funded study.

 

Brief overview

Recently, the UK voted to exit the European Union (EU). This so-called ‘Brexit’ highlighted a perception that native workers are disadvantaged due to the presence of migrant workers. However, as the UK Higher Education (HE) has over a quarter (28%) migrant academics (HESA, 2016) from different educational and professional value systems, the British academic may gain a wide variety of professional knowledge through working with their migrant colleagues. The research aims to explore these professional learning (non-)gains of the British academic and how it particularly affects the nature of their pedagogical work. The research outcomes will aid universities’ senior management to plan appropriate training for engendering a synergistic environment to ensure a high teaching quality and student experience. The objective, therefore, is to identify these possible professional learning gains of British academics and through this recommend how these gains can maintain or improve the teaching quality and student experience.

________________________________________________________________________________________



Dr Zaki Nahaboo, The rights and wrongs of the High Court ruling on triggering Article 50, (16 January 2017). 

 

Des arguments pour et contre la décision de la Haute Cour sur le déclenchement de « « « Article 50 »

La Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni décidera bientôt si le Parlement a son mot à dire au sujet de « Brexit ».  Les enjeux sont énormes, cependant, de toute façon, une partie criera victoire pour « le peuple ».

Les droits légaux de tous les habitants de Grande-Bretagne devenaient de plus en plus incertains. La position des ressortissants de l’UE qui habiteront dans un Grande Bretagne « post Brexit » reste encore ouverte. L’avenir de la législation européenne existante, par exemple le nombre maximum d’heures de travail et le droit d’être oublié en ligne, risque de ne pas perdurer une fois incorporés dans la législation nationale. Tandis que la loi de 1998 sur les droits de la personne était en partie une conséquence de la Convention européenne du Conseil de l'Europe sur les droits de l'homme (CEDH) et pas de l’UE, ses jours sont aussi comptés alors que l’évolution vers son abrogation prend de l’ampleur à cause du « Brexit ». Par conséquence, les demandeurs d’asile et des intervenants peuvent se retrouver rapidement avec des outils réduits pour rechercher la justice. La spéculation et la surveillance règnent à part égale.

Dissiper le brouillard de « Brexit » et trouver un moyen clair vers un régime potentiel des droits « post-Brexit » a suscité beaucoup d’intérêt par des comités spéciaux, des universitaires et la société civile.  Ces pistes d’enquête sont actuellement frustrées par le manque des plans du domaine public pour le départ de Grande Bretagne de l’UE. Pourtant même sans accéder aux subtilités des termes de la sortie proposés par Grande Bretagne, certains paramètres pour la compréhension des droits commencent à organiser des débats dominants. La décision de la Haute Cour sur « R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union[1] » et les reportages médiatiques ultérieures cristallisent les principales façons dont les droits sont encadrés et adoptés publiquement avant le départ officiel de Grande Bretagne de l’Union européenne. 

Dr Zaki Nahaboo

Clike here to view the full article: https://www.opendemocracy.net/zaki-nahaboo/rights-and-wrongs-of-high-court-ruling-on-triggering-article-50



[1] https://www.supremecourt.uk/cases/docs/uksc-2016-0196-judgment.pdf

Overview

Welcome from the Directors

Bryce Evans Lille Institute Dr Ioannis Panoussis

In the current global climate, the fostering of cross-border academic collaboration is important.

That is why a firm Anglo-French academic alliance is so unusual and significant.

In 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille decided to form a strategic alliance around teaching and research. Central to this alliance is the development of a European Institute. This body aims to provide a framework for cross-disciplinary research projects, publications, joint masters degrees and co-supervision of PhD students.

This website provides information on how the European Institute functions, what we are achieving together and what we will achieve in the future.

History teaches us that European cooperation is essential in achieving peace, growth and progress; it is in this spirit that the Institut Européen/European Institute operates and in this spirit that we as educators, students and citizens thrive.

Dr Bryce Evans and Dr Ioannis Panoussis

Directors of the Institut Européen/European Institute

 

Aims of the partnership

In June 2016 Liverpool Hope University and l’Université Catholique de Lille signed a strategic roadmap detailing their plans for joint collaboration around research, teaching, and development of joint degree programmes to 2019 and beyond.  

The Roadmap for Strategic Alliance was signed by the two Rectors, Professor Gerald Pillay and Professor Pierre Giorgini in Lille. The two universities have already embarked on a student and staff exchange programme. 

Aims of the Institute 

  • Supporting bilateral staff collaboration (Erasmus exchange and research)
  • Fostering student exchange
  • Developing research collaboration
  • Promoting public engagement
  • Building towards joint degree programmes where appropriate

The investment in this partnership by both universities steps up strategic research collaboration and aims to have a significant impact in the UK, France and across Europe.

The Institute is embedded within eight academic projects involving a wide array of disciplines - English language and literature, business, law, environmental studies, politics and international relations, education, health sciences, psychology, theology and philosophy.

Fostering new, intellectually and culturally enriching learning opportunities for students is high on the agenda of both universities. It is hoped that studying abroad, gaining work experience and volunteering will be significantly enhanced by the new agreement.

People and Places

Organisational structure

The Institute is directed by Dr Bryce Evans (Liverpool Hope) and Dr Ioannis Panoussis (Lille).

There is a strategic committee composed of academics which meets biennially. 

There are a number of interdisciplinary working groups based around the following areas:

  • Future of Europe (law, politics, economics, sociology)
  • Enterprise and sustainability (business, marketing, economics)
  • Teaching innovation (Education)
  • Health care, society and policy (social work, policy studies, psychology)
  • Literature and popular culture (literature, media)
  • Hermeneutics (theology, philosophy)
  • Ecology and environment (geography, ecology)

 

Academic Committee Members 

Dr. Bryce Evans Co-director

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Ms. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator

 

 

More about Lille

For more information about Lille, visit the Lonely Planet website.

For more information about l’Université Catholique de Lille, please visit their website.

 

More about Liverpool

For more information about Liverpool, visit the Lonely Planet website.

Events 2017

The Institute oversees and facilitates cooperation in the following areas:

  • Research collaboration
  • Teaching collaboration
  • Student exchanges
  • Joint Masters programmes

 

PhD scholarships programme

For more information about the PhD scholarships programmes, download the following PDFs:

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Information Leaflet

Hope-Lille PhD Scholarships Personal Statement Guidance Notes

 

Europe Day annual lecture

The Institute holds an annual distinguished lecture on Europe Day (on or around 9 May).

 

Annual conference

There is an annual themed conference featuring academics from both universities and other European institutions.

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 

 

28 Feb to 3 March 2017
Liverpool Hope University students take a Erasmus taster trip to Lille
Guest Lecture Series 2017  
8th March 2017 Patricia Connell delivers a lecture on the French Diaspora and Brexit
w/c Monday 20 March 2017  Address by Matt Kelly, editor New European newspaper
Date TBC Address by Christophe Premat - Deputy for French residents overseas
Date TBC  Address by Mark Durcan, MP (SDLP - Foyle) member of the UK Brexit Committee
Conferences 2017  
8 May Europe Day  Keynote Lecture - Axelle Lemaire, French Minister of State for the Digital Secor and Innovation 

 

Events Archive

  • ‘The Trump Presidency: Implications for Europe’ roundtable 5 December 2016
  • ‘European perspectives on Brexit’ roundtable 12 December 2016

Contact Us

Dr Bryce Evans
Senior Lecturer in History
Department of History and Politics
Liverpool Hope University
L16 9JD
+44 (0)151 2913585

evansb1@hope.ac.uk

Visit my blog

Follow me on Twitter

 

 Academic Committee Contacts:

Mrs. Ruth Rees Administrator

Professor Nick Rees Dean of Arts and Humanities

Dr. Wendy Bignold Associate Dean (International)

Mrs. Shauna Anton Erasmus Coordinator                      

 

The Channel – working paper and blog series

The Institute welcomes blog articles and working papers for discussion on the website. To submit a piece click here 

Working Papers

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) 

Universitaires immigrants au « pays étranger pédagogique » - des facteurs qui influencent leur acculturation pédagogique

 

Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey.

Un bref aperçu

Un des effets de la mondialisation a été une augmentation du voyage transfrontalier des universitaires dans l’enseignement supérieur (HE).  On estime que, dans l’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni, environ 28 % des universitaires sont les non Britanniques (HEFCE, 2015).  Ces universitaires immigrants ont souvent « un habitus pédagogique » lié à leur expérience d’enseignement antérieure et aux environnements pédagogiques. Il pourrait ainsi engendrer « une dissonance pédagogique », crée par l’inadéquation entre les pratiques d’apprentissage/d’enseignement à lesquelles ces universitaires sont accoutumées et celles à lesquelles ils sont exposées dans leur nouveau contexte. Suivant la théorie d’acculturation de Berry (1997), nous estimons que toute dissonance conséquente peut conduire à la séparation, la marginalisation, l’assimilation ou l’intégration de ces universitaires dans leur nouvel environnement pédagogique.  À l’aide d’un questionnaire, l’étude sera basée sur les expériences pédagogiques des universitaires immigrants pendant les cinq premières années de leur enseignement dans les établissements d’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni (HEIs), suivi d’interviews avec certains des répondants pour acquérir une compréhension approfondie de la question. Il est attendu que les données nous permettront d’étudier des barrières dont ces universitaires immigrants pourraient percevoir dans le domaine de l’enseignement au Royaume-Uni, et comment ils font face à les stratégies de leurs instituts hôtes pour les acculturer dans leur nouveau milieu pédagogique. Ces résultats nous permettront d’identifier toute « dissonance pédagogique » à laquelle ces universitaires est confrontée pour mieux comprendre leurs besoins professionnels en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage. Ces activités de recherche seraient utiles pour des développeurs universitaires, la gestion supérieure et des universitaires natifs en aidant des universitaires immigrants à s’intégrer harmonieusement leurs pratiques pédagogiques dans « une internationalisation symbiotique » du processus d’enseignement-apprentissage.

(Dr Namrato Rao, Université de Liverpool Hope, Dr Anesa Hosein, Université de Surrey. Cette étude est financée par SEDA)

 



 

 

Immigrant academics in the pedagogic ‘foreign-land’: Factors influencing their pedagogic acculturation

 

Dr Namrata Rao along with Dr Anesa Hosein  (University of Surrey) are working on this SEDA funded study.

 

Brief overview

With globalisation there has been an increase in cross-border travel of academics within Higher Education (HE). It is estimated that in the UK HE around 28% of the academics are non-British (HEFCE, 2015). These immigrant academics often have a ‘pedagogical habitus’, related to their previous teaching experience and learning environments. This may result in a ‘pedagogic dissonance’ created by the mismatch between the learning-teaching practices these academics are accustomed to and the ones they are exposed to in their new context. Using Berry’s acculturation theory (1997), we contend that any consequent dissonance may lead to separation, marginalisation, assimilation or integration of these academics in their new pedagogic environment. Using a questionnaire, the study will draw on the pedagogical experiences of immigrant academics within the first five years of their teaching within UK HE institutions (HEIs), followed by interviews with some of these respondents for an in-depth understanding of the issue. It is anticipated that the data will help explore any barriers these immigrant academics may perceive in teaching in the UK and how they experience their host HEIs’ strategies to acculturate them into their new pedagogic milieu. Findings will help identify any ‘pedagogic dissonance’ these academics face to better understand their professional teaching and learning needs. The research would be of value to academic developers, senior management and native academics in helping meet the professional needs of the immigrant academics to successfully integrate their pedagogical practices in a ‘symbiotic internationalisation’ of the teaching-learning process.

________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Migrant Academics and Professional Learning Gains: Perspectives of the Native Academics

 

Dr Namrata Rao, along with Dr Anesa Hosein and Professor Ian Kinchin (University of Surrey) are working on this SRHE funded study.

 

Brief overview

Recently, the UK voted to exit the European Union (EU). This so-called ‘Brexit’ highlighted a perception that native workers are disadvantaged due to the presence of migrant workers. However, as the UK Higher Education (HE) has over a quarter (28%) migrant academics (HESA, 2016) from different educational and professional value systems, the British academic may gain a wide variety of professional knowledge through working with their migrant colleagues. The research aims to explore these professional learning (non-)gains of the British academic and how it particularly affects the nature of their pedagogical work. The research outcomes will aid universities’ senior management to plan appropriate training for engendering a synergistic environment to ensure a high teaching quality and student experience. The objective, therefore, is to identify these possible professional learning gains of British academics and through this recommend how these gains can maintain or improve the teaching quality and student experience.

________________________________________________________________________________________



Dr Zaki Nahaboo, The rights and wrongs of the High Court ruling on triggering Article 50, (16 January 2017). 

 

Des arguments pour et contre la décision de la Haute Cour sur le déclenchement de « « « Article 50 »

La Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni décidera bientôt si le Parlement a son mot à dire au sujet de « Brexit ».  Les enjeux sont énormes, cependant, de toute façon, une partie criera victoire pour « le peuple ».

Les droits légaux de tous les habitants de Grande-Bretagne devenaient de plus en plus incertains. La position des ressortissants de l’UE qui habiteront dans un Grande Bretagne « post Brexit » reste encore ouverte. L’avenir de la législation européenne existante, par exemple le nombre maximum d’heures de travail et le droit d’être oublié en ligne, risque de ne pas perdurer une fois incorporés dans la législation nationale. Tandis que la loi de 1998 sur les droits de la personne était en partie une conséquence de la Convention européenne du Conseil de l'Europe sur les droits de l'homme (CEDH) et pas de l’UE, ses jours sont aussi comptés alors que l’évolution vers son abrogation prend de l’ampleur à cause du « Brexit ». Par conséquence, les demandeurs d’asile et des intervenants peuvent se retrouver rapidement avec des outils réduits pour rechercher la justice. La spéculation et la surveillance règnent à part égale.

Dissiper le brouillard de « Brexit » et trouver un moyen clair vers un régime potentiel des droits « post-Brexit » a suscité beaucoup d’intérêt par des comités spéciaux, des universitaires et la société civile.  Ces pistes d’enquête sont actuellement frustrées par le manque des plans du domaine public pour le départ de Grande Bretagne de l’UE. Pourtant même sans accéder aux subtilités des termes de la sortie proposés par Grande Bretagne, certains paramètres pour la compréhension des droits commencent à organiser des débats dominants. La décision de la Haute Cour sur « R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union[1] » et les reportages médiatiques ultérieures cristallisent les principales façons dont les droits sont encadrés et adoptés publiquement avant le départ officiel de Grande Bretagne de l’Union européenne. 

Dr Zaki Nahaboo

Clike here to view the full article: https://www.opendemocracy.net/zaki-nahaboo/rights-and-wrongs-of-high-court-ruling-on-triggering-article-50



[1] https://www.supremecourt.uk/cases/docs/uksc-2016-0196-judgment.pdf