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Littoral 2017 Conference

Welcome

Littoral 2017 Conference 

Welcome to the website for the Littoral 2017 Conference 

5th - 7th September 2017

Liverpool Hope University

 

We are pleased to announce our three-day international conference and excursions exploring the anthropocene and the littoral, with particular reference to the themes of 'change, naturalness and people'. The conference will seek to examine how humans and human processes influence the littoral, and how these influences may now be viewed as natural, as much as any other natural processes.

The theme will gather all disciplines to explore current issues of relevance to the coast and will be of interest to a wide spectrum of scientists , including those from the physical sciences, climate change scientists and ecologists, social scientists, engineers, policy makers and advisers and practitioners. 

The official language of the conference will be English and translation facilities will not be available.

UPDATE 14th July 2017

Following a successful initial calls for sessions and papers the programme for the conference is now available.

At this late stage, if you wish to submit an abstract for an oral paper or poster paper, or wish to propose a session, please e-mail materials to littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

Key dates

  •  The provisional programme is now published. Updates will appear so please check the programme on a regular basis
  • "Early bird" prices are available until Friday 14th July 2017, by which date all those listed on the conference programme and attending (e.g. convenors, chairs, presenting authors) should be registered.

For more information, please email: littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

We look forward to welcoming you to the fantastic city of Liverpool!

Twitter: @Littoral_2017

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Littoral-2017-572369719582006/

 

Abstract Submission Guidelines

Please provide a clear title for your proposed paper, you name(s), affiliations and an e-mail contact for the corresponding author. Also provide between 5 and 10 key words or phrases. The main body of the abstract for your proposed paper should not exceed the 350 words. Submit proposals by e-mail to littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

 

Session Proposal Guidelines

Please provide a clear title for your proposed session, the name(s) of the convenor(s), affiliations and an e-mail contact for the lead convenor. Also provide a brief description (250 word maximum) of the theme / topic of the session together with an indication of the duration of your proposed session for the conference programme. Please identify any special facilities you may require, e.g. audio-visual. Submit proposals by e-mail to littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

Programme

LITTORAL 2017 PROGRAAME (updated 14th July)

Monday 4th September

  • Pre-conference EUCC business meeting(s)
  • Pre-conference  optional social event (free event - e-mail littoral2017@hope.ac.uk if you would like to attend)

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Tuesday 5th September

  • 9 – 9.30 am - Registration
  • 9.30 – 9.40 am - Welcome and Opening Address

Open Session – 9.40 – 11.00am

ChairPaul Rooney, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Liverpool Hope University, UK

Accepted oral presentations (as 10th July)

  • Window dressing: post-Azure Window collapse in Gozo - Prof John A. Schembri, Department of Geography, University of Malta, Malta
  • Constructing Co-existence: Human Naturalness and the Ascendancy of Landscape Architecture - Alex Heid, MLA and Christopher Tallman, MLA - Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota, USA
  • An analysis of  the effects of sea level rise on the breeding habitat of Terns in the Wadden Sea- Rogier Bakker, Anne te Koppele, Theo Vreugdenhil, Ruben de Vries and Leo Bentvelzen - Van Hall Larenstein, University of Applied Sciences , The Netherlands
  • Old plantations of stone pine (Pinus pinea) compromise the conservation of coastal Atlantic wet heaths. Results of clear-cutting and effects on soil and non-target plants (LIFE13/NAT/ES/000586) - Juan García-de-Lomas, Laura Fernández-Carrillo, María D. Cobo, Concepción Saavedra, Ildefonso Martín and Carmen Rodríguez, Spain

 

Coffee Break – 11.00 – 11.20am

 

11.20am  – 12.40 pm Session theme - Invasive Alien Species in Coastal Dunes

Overview – The sustainable management/control of invasive alien species is one of the major challenges for conservation management, including for coastal dunes. The arrival, establishment, spread and invasion of alien species is an ongoing process, driven by the continuous import of new species. Furthermore, the range expansion of  alien species in southern countries also has to be considered. Coastal managers need effective early warning systems for new naturalising species, up to date information and data on invasive species in dunes and effective, sustainable (successful in the long term) management techniques. International cooperation and exchange of knowledge and field experiences are essential to increase invasive species awareness across administrative boundaries.

In many countries, national web-portals dealing with invasive species of countrywide importance are available. In Europe a continental information system exists to support the implementation of new invasive species regulation. These systems can provide useful tools for horizon scanning and risk assessment. However, none of them are targeted towards dune ecosystems. Hence, to deal with the specific context of dune invasions and potential solutions, a European dune platform is required.

Coastal dunes all over Europe are characterised by a number of similar issues related to invasive species which differ substantially from inland situations. Decisions on management priorities and methods need to be evidence-based and must be taken transparently using established methods. In addition, awareness raising to increase the public’s invasion literacy is needed to support the acceptance and understanding of sometimes drastic management methods. Alongside this adequate monitoring systems are essential to survey the distribution and spread of alien species, the evaluation of management measures and to report on the state of invasions in dune ecosystems.

In the session, examples of early warning systems, public information, success and failures in relation to control, as well as monitoring programs are presented from a regional up to an international scale. The aim of the session is to foster knowledge exchange on invasive alien species in dune ecosystems and to bring on ideas towards an international community of practice. Presentations are welcome which address the issues.

Convenors (Chair tbc)-

  • Dr Maike Isermann, Bremen University, Vegetation Ecology, Bremen, Germany
  • Tim Adriaens, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium
  • Luc Geelen, Waternet, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Sam Provoost, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium
  • Uffe Strandby, Ministry of Environment and Food, Nature Agency, Denmark

Accepted oral presentations (as 10th July)

  • Invasive alien plants in European Atlantic and Baltic coastal dunes - overview of the scientific background. Maike Isermann Bremen University, Germany
  • Invasive Alien Species in Dunes: examples from the North Holland dunes  - Dick Groenendijk, PWN Water Supply Company North Holland, The Netherlands.
  • Invasive Alien Species in Dunes:  showcase  Prunus serotina in the Amsterdam Dunes – Luc Geelen, Waternet, The Netherlands
  • Sisal (Agave sisalana) invasion of arborescent matorrals with Ziziphus in Almería (southern Spain): integrating nature conservation and particular feelings of local communities (LIFE13/NAT/ES/000586) - Laura Fernández-Carrillo, Carmen Rodríguez, Fernando J. Sanz, Hedwig Schwarzer, José L. Caparrós, Juan García-de-Lomas  and Montserrat Sanchez. Spain

 

12.40 -2.00pm Buffet Lunch with Poster Papers and Displays

 

2.00 - Session theme -  Threats and solutions in dunes and dune slacks 

Overview - Dune grassland and dune slack wetlands are designated a priority habitat in Europe, but are currently in ‘unfavourable bad’ condition. In other areas around the globe dune habitats are also under threat, resulting in loss and degradation of this valuable habitat. The main pressures and threats include habitat loss, nitrogen pollution, invasive alien species, climate change and recreation pressures. Conservation measures include re-instating appropriate management techniques, including use of natural dynamics, managing local hydrological conditions exploring new options for restoring these habitats.

Chair - Dr Laurence Jones / Camiel Aggenbach

Accepted oral presentations (as 14th July)

  • Bringing science into sand dune restoration funding bids: challenges, opportunities and lessons learned so far -  Sue Rees, Senior Environmental Specialist, Specialist Services and Programmes Team, Natural England, UK
  • What is the effect of grazing by rabbits and livestock on vegetation development compared with seven exclosures? - Harrie GJM van der Hagen (Dune Water Company of South Holland and Department of Environmental Science, Wageningen University) , Nils van Rooijen (Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity Conservation, KU Leuven) and Prof. Dr Joop HJ Schaminée (Wageningen University and the Radboud University, Nijmegen) – The Netherlands
  • Does atmospheric nitrogen deposition lead to greater nitrogen and carbon accumulation in coastal sand dunes?  - Camiel J.S. Aggenbach,  Yuki Fujita (KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands), Annemiek Kooijman (Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics [IBED], University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Dr Mark van Til (Waternet Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Harrie G.J.M. van der Hagen (Dune Water Company of South Holland and Department of Environmental Science, Wageningen University), David Cooper and Dr Laurence Jones (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK)
  • Testing botanical indicators for nitrogen enrichment in large scale atmospheric nitrogen gradients in dry dune grassland in the UK - Dr Laurence Jones and Carly Stevens (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK)

3.20 – 3.40 pm Coffee Break

  • Thirty years of change for Scottish sand dunes – Prof Robin Pakeman, The James Hutton Institute, UK
  • Dry dune grasslands and climate change: what to expect? Yuki Fujtia, R.P. Bartholomeus  (KWR Watercycle Research Institute, The Netherlands) and Witte, J.P.M. (KWR Watercycle Research Institute and VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Great Lakes dunes: effects of periodic variations in lake levels and local influences on the ecohydrology of a Lake Michigan coastal slack - Suzanne DeVries-Zimmerman, Hope College, Michigan USA
  • Groundwater nutrient impacts on dune slack vegetation - Laurence Jones (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK) and Jennifer Rhymes (Manchester University, UK)
  • Quantifying the influence of rainfall interception on dune slack hydrological regime: implications for management - Charlie Stratford, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK

5.00pm Plenary and Introduction to Field Trips on Wednesday 6th September

 

* Evening - Conference Dinner on Hope Park campus (additional fee applies to be paid on registration for the conference).

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Wednesday 6th September - Field trips

Delegates select one option for the field trips. Packed lunch provided.

Option 1 - Mersey Gateway Project

Facilitators – The Mersey Gateway Project team, led by Paul Oldfield, Environment and Biodiversity Manager

In autumn this year, the Mersey Gateway Project — a £1.89 billion scheme incorporating a new six-lane toll bridge over the River Mersey — will open.

With an extensive saltmarsh restoration scheme on both sides of the estuary, the Mersey Gateway scheme is a unique green project that will bring major environmental benefits to the local area, and environmental issues have been a key focus since the project was first developed.

The project has an innovative approach to mitigation - the Mersey Gateway Environmental Trust (MGET) is an independent charitable trust that has been established to create a new 28.5 hectare nature reserve around the bridge. It also aims to increase the bird and wildlife population of the Upper Mersey Estuary and secure additional funding for environmental initiatives in the area over the next 30 years.

 

Option 2 – Formby Dunes

Facilitators – The National Trust team, led by Andrew Brockbank , Countryside Manager

The Formby coast is one of the most accessible parts of the Sefton Coast sand dune system with car parks at Lifeboat Road and Victoria Road and regular links via Merseyrail to nearby stations at Formby and Freshfield. The beginnings of an integrated approach to coastal management at Formby were put in place with the establishment of the Sefton Coast Management Scheme in 1978. Large scale restoration took place to stabilise frontal dunes, improve parking, access and provision of informal recreation facilities and manage woodland plantations. Nearly 40 years later the Formby coast is cherished as a favourite seaside destination for locals, and visitors from much further afield - 555,000 annual visits place considerable demands on the dune landscape and facilities with approximately 85% arriving by car. Parts of the area remain under pressure from use by people and investment in visitor and recreation management, sustainable access and infrastructure is required to help build the resilience of the coast

The visit will provide an opportunity to walk across Formby Point to witness this dramatic landscape from the relatively stable and accreting dunes at Ravenmeols LNR to the dynamic exposed section of shifting dunes and sand sheets closer to Victoria Road. The National Trust has begun a programme of local community involvement to better understand current issues and needs and guide investment in facilities which will enhance visitor experience and build support for improved coastal conservation.

 

  • Evening - Informal social event – Liverpool city centre

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Thursday 7th September

  • 9 – 9.15 am - Registration
  • 9.15 – 9.20 am - Welcome and Opening Address for the Final Day

 

9.20 – 10.20am Open session

 

Chair – Rev Prof David Chester, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Liverpool Hope University, UK

Accepted oral presentations (as 10th July)

  • Spatial and temporal patterns of two crab species (Carcinus maenas and Cancer pagurus) on intertidal rocky shores of the Irish Sea - Fikret Öndes, Faculty of Fisheries, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Turkey
  • The human security implications of Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in littoral communities in Bonny Island, Nigeria - Ifesinachi Okafor-Yarwood, King's College, UK
  • Seasonal dynamics of amphipods associated with mussel facies in Izmir Bay (Aegean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean) – Dr Fikret Öndes, Faculty of Fisheries, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Turkey

 

10.20 – 10.40am Coffee Break

 

  • IMPACT Project of INTERREG Europe and its Impact on Coastal and Marine Protected Areas in Lithuania – Dr Ramūnas Povilanskas, EUCC Baltic Office, Lithuania
  • Spatial planning for the sustainable expansion of wind energy: perspectives of a coastal area in southern Brazil -  Carlos Vinicius da Cruz Weissa (Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio Grande do Sul [IFRS], Brazil) Paulo Roberto Armanini Tagliania, Jean Marcel de Almeida Espinozab, Lucas Terres de Limaa and Tiago Borges Ribeiro Gandraba (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande [FURG], Brazil)
  • Current status of marine and coastal protected areas in Turkey – Dr Fikret Öndes (Faculty of Fisheries, Izmir Kâtip Çelebi University, Turkey) and Dr Harun Güçlüsoy (Institute of Marine Sciences and Technology, Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey)
  • Future scenarios in the land use of the Rio Grande Do Sol plain (Brazil) using the Molusce Platform: applicability in coastal management studies- Lucas Lima and Cristina Bernardes,  Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Geoscience Department, University of Aveiro, Portugal

 

12.00 – 1.00 – Buffet Lunch with Poster Papers and Displays

 

1.00 – 2.30pm Session theme - Marine Planning: achieving progress across boundaries, theories, and sectors towards sustainability

Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) an important tool for the sustainable management of the European littoral and seas.  In this session we will seek to take stock of progress in MSP and consider some of the key governance challenges which remain.  Firstly, we will consider the possibilities for transboundary and supranational co-operation, an important issue as many European marine systems are shared across jurisdictions.  Secondly, we will explore the challenges for effective planning processes, particularly the evaluation and monitoring phase and related debates about what MSP is designed to achieve.  Ecosystem-based management is a key paradigm for European marine planning, reflected in many national policies and international agreements.  At the same time, a debate has emerged about a range of theoretical framings, including more radical conceptulisations of marine planning.  Thirdly, we will consider the levels of sectoral and scientific involvement in marine planning.  The marine planning systems which have recently emerged across Europe contrast in terms of their regulatory powers, and level of involvement of different sectors or influence on other initiatives. The session will draw lessons from European experience about the possibilities for increasing scientific input, stakeholder engagement and institutional coherence, in order to work towards sustainability. 

Convenors and Chairs:

  • Dr L McGowan, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Liverpool, UK
  • Dr T A Stojanovic, School of Geography and Sustainable Development, University of St Andrews, UK

Accepted oral presentations (by 10th July)

  • Governance Frameworks for Marine Planning - Dr Timothy A Stojanovic School of Geography and Sustainable Development, and Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, UK
  • Capturing the Transnational Dimension in Scenarios for Maritime Spatial Planning - Lynne McGowan, Stephen Jay, Sue Kidd, Charlotte Billingham and Charlotte Hopkins, Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
  • The MSP Directive and a new era of ICM? - Sue Kidd,  Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
  • Evaluating Marine Spatial Planning - Charlotte Hopkins Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK

2.30 – 2.50 – Coffee Break

2.50 – 5.10pm Session theme - Mobile dunes and dune dynamics

Overview: Dunes are naturally dynamic, and the mobile phases include the beach-dune transition zone, embryo dunes, foredunes, mobile dunes and secondary blowouts. This dynamism is essential to maintain many rare dune species. Significant pressures and threats include coastal engineering works, tourism development, recreational activities and invasive alien species, and changes in climate which can all interfere with natural dynamics. Restoration approaches include re-instating dune dynamics through managed de-stabilisation and increasing connectivity with the beach. Long-term successful solutions require engagement with site managers, the public, as well as shoreline management (sea defence and coast protection) agencies. This remains a major area for the exchange of knowledge and coordination of national policy in addressing issues relating to dune dynamics and the need for climate change adaptation.

Chair - tbc

Accepted oral presentations (by 14th July)

  • Coastal Sediment Compartments as a Framework for Australian Coastal Management - Prof. Colin Woodroffe,  Dr Rafael Carvalho (University of Wollongong, Australia), Dr Ian Eliot, Dr Matt Eliot (Damara WA Pty Ltd, Australia), Prof. Nick Harvey ( University of Adelaide and James Cook University, Australia), Dr David Rissik ( Griffith University , Australia), Chris Sharples (University of Tasmania, Australia), Prof. Andrew Short (University of Sydney and University of Wollongong , Australia) and Prof. Bruce Thom ( Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists, University of Sydney  and  University of Wollongong, Australia)
  • Conservation of dune habitats in the Atlantic Biogeographic Region: the roadmap for knowledge exchange and networking 2016-2020 - John Houston, Environmental Consultant, UK
  • Conservation or Preservation; the challenge of aligning scientific, public and policy understanding of dune ecosystems -  John Ratcliffe, Graham Williams, Emmer Litt and Julie Creer – Natural Resources Wales, UK
  • Exploring the spatio-temporal effects of secondary blowouts on dune soil and vegetation - Camiel J.S. Aggenbach and Yuki Fujita, Ecosystem Management Research Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Belgium
  • Incident wind flow direction directly impacts the formation and morphology of turbulent wind flow structures in the lee of parabolic dunes – Dr Thomas Smyth (Liverpool Hope University, UK), Dr Brian Yurk and Dr Edward Hansen (Hope College, Michigan, USA)
  • Great Lakes Dunes: Documenting the effects of storms as drivers of dune processes on the eastern shoreline of Lake Michigan-  Dr Brian E. Bodenbender, Dr Brian P. Yurk, Dr Clayton B. Sanders, and Dr Edward C. Hansen - Hope College, Michigan, USA
  • Resistance and resilience of coastal natural and artificial foredune communities to physical disturbance  Bass J. (Institute of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Germany), Balke T. (School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK) and Minden V. (Department of Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium)

5.10 - 5.20 pm – Closing Remarks

 * Contact the conference organisers directly on littoral2017@hope.ac.uk if you are interested in joining informal post conference excursions. Arrangements and availability will depend on demand *

Prices&Deadlines

 

"Early bird" prices - now available until Friday 14th July 2017 (updated 31st May 2017)

Full Residential Package [For arrival Tuesday 5th September 2017 and departure Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Conference Fee

-  Bed & Breakfast x 2 nights

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet lunch [Tuesday 5th and Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Hot three course evening meal [Tuesday 5th September]

- Conference Field Excursions with packed lunch [Wednesday 6th September 2017]

 

Option 1 - Single en-suite in University Halls of Residence = £435 (non-member) or £400 (EUCC member)                                        

Option 2 - Executive double en-suite in Eden Suite University Hotel = £515 (non-member) or £480 (EUCC member)

 

Non- Residential Packages

Tuesday 5th September 2017 = £100 (non-member) or £90 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Wednesday 6th September 2017 = £85 (non-member) or £70 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Field Excursions [including coach hire, packed lunch and supporting material]

- Packed Lunch

 

Thursday 7th September 2017 = £100 (non-member) or £90 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Additional Extras:

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Single en-suite University Halls of Residence = £50.00 (non-member) or £45.00 (EUCC member)

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Executive double en-suite in University Hotel = £70.00 (non-member) or £65.00 (EUCC member)

Conference Dinner Fee for Residential Delegates = £15.00

Conference Dinner Fee for Non - Residential Delegates = £40.00

 

 

Late Booking Prices - for bookings made after 14th July 2017 

Full Residential Package [For arrival Tuesday 5th September 2017 and departure Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Conference Fee

-  Bed & Breakfast x 2 nights

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet lunch [Tuesday 5th and Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Hot three course evening meal [Tuesday 5th September]

- Conference Field Excursions with packed lunch [Wednesday 6th September 2017]

 

Option 1 - Single en-suite in University Halls of Residence = £485 (non-member) or £450 (EUCC member)                                        

Option 2 - Executive double en-suite in Eden Suite University Hotel = £565 (non-member) or £530 (EUCC member)

 

Non- Residential Packages

Tuesday 5th September 2017 = £120 (non-member) or £110 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Wednesday 6th September 2017 = £105 (non-member) or £90 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Field Excursions [including coach hire, packed lunch and supporting material]

- Packed Lunch

 

Thursday 7th September 2017 = £120 (non-member) or £110 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Additional Extras:

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Single en-suite University Halls of Residence = £60.00 (non-member) or £55.00 (EUCC member)

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Executive double en-suite in University Hotel = £80.00 (non-member) or £75.00 (EUCC member)

Conference Dinner Fee for Residential Delegates = £20.00

Conference Dinner Fee for Non - Residential Delegates = £45.00

 

** PLEASE NOTE THERE ARE A LIMITED NUMBER OF ROOMS AVAILABLE IN THE EDEN SUITE AND THESE WILL BE ALLOCATED ON A FIRST-COME FIRST-SERVED BASIS **

 

To register to attend this event please click here, where you will be redirected to the University Online Store.

Organizing Partners

  • Liverpool Hope University and the Faculty of Science

The Littoral 2017 conference is hosted by Liverpool Hope University, Faculty of Science. Liverpool Hope University is the only ecumenical university in Europe. It is shaped by Christian principles but embraces those of all faiths and none. The Faculty of Science contains the Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Department of Psychology and the School of Health Sciences.

Littoral 2017 is organised by the ‘Sand Dune and Shingle Network’ http://coast.hope.ac.uk/  based in the Department of Geography and Environmental Science at Liverpool Hope University. The aim of the ‘Sand Dune and Shingle Network’ is to conserve sand dunes and shingle as dynamic landscapes. The network seeks to achieve this by:-

  • Encouraging people to value and understand the habitats.
  • Championing the habitats.
  • Facilitating an exchange of knowledge and support actions that are beneficial
  • Making the Network an active community of participants, and a recognised source of expertise and authority at the global level.

This initiative builds on the results of networking, highlights projects and publications, and develops opportunities for conferences, study tours and workshops. It also took the lead in developing, and operates as part of, a European Dune Network and works closely with the Coastal & Marine Union (EUCC).

 

The Littoral 2017 conference is one of a series of events stemming from the Coastal & Marine Union (EUCC). Coastal & Marine Union (EUCC) is a non profit organization with a membership of around 500 institutions, NGOs and experts, in 40 countries. Its network at large involves about 2500 professionals involved in coastal and marine management issues. EUCC has been organizing bi-annual conferences since 1987 implementing its network’s mission namely “bringing together the scientific community, coastal practitioners and policy makers”. Until 1999, the conference was organized uniquely by EUCC under the name “Coastlines”, and later on it joined forces with Eurocoast, an association mainly concerned by the technical aspects of coastal processes, thus giving birth to the ‘Littoral’ conferences in 2002.

 

The Commission on Coastal Systems encourages the study of coastal systems throughout the world. The Commission sponsors and supports activities leading to the exchange of information regarding coastal systems among our members and throughout the IGU at large. The focus of attention is on interactive systems, both human and physical, and the areas of inquiry include issues such as sea-level rise, land-use changes, estuarine resources, coastal tourism and shoreline development, coastal recreation, and coastal zone management. The Commission will make concerted efforts to emphasize issues of Global Change.

 

  • Hope College, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences

https://hope.edu/academic/geology/department/

Hope College is a four-year liberal arts college in Michigan, USA, where academic excellence and vibrant Christian faith join together in a supportive and welcoming community. Hope’s campus is nestled in the heart of downtown Holland, just miles from Lake Michigan. The Geological and Environmental Sciences Department offers a Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, and a minor in Geology, and also a minor in Environmental Science. Academics from the department work closely on research dune projects with colleagues from Liverpool Hope University’s Department of Geography and Environmental Science.

 

  • The National Trust (Field trip provider for this conference)

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/

The National Trust is a conservation organisation in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom. The trust describes itself as "a charity that works to preserve and protect historic places and spaces—for ever, for everyone." The National Trust is the largest private landowner in the United Kingdom. It owns or protects roughly one fifth of the coastline in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (775 miles), and has a long-term campaign, Project Neptune, which seeks to acquire more.

 

  • Mersey Gateway Environmental Trust (Field trip provider for this conference)

http://www.merseygateway.co.uk/mersey-gateway-environmental-trust/

The Mersey Gateway Environmental Trust (MGET) is an independent Charitable Trust set up in 2010 to promote the conservation, protection and improvement of the environment across a 1600 hectare area of the Upper Mersey Estuary running all the way from the Mersey Gateway Bridge up river as far as Warrington. The Trust aims to create a new 28.5 hectare nature reserve around the bridge.

 

  • Other Acknowledgements

Thank you to the many coastal colleagues who have helped to organise and promote this event. They are too numerous to name individually here. Their names and organisations are included in the conference programme.

 

 

 

 

Liverpool&The Venue

Liverpool is a global city, one that’s proud of its heritage and culture but also passionate about looking to the future. This makes it an exciting, inspiring and exhilarating place to host Littoral 2016. The Liverpool city region is of international importance with the Dee Estuary SAC, Mersey Estuary SAC , Sefton Coast SAC and the Ribble Estuary SAC. These sites are between 10 minutes and 1 hour travel time of the conference venue. The coast of Liverpool offers an amazing combination of near natural estuary and sand dune wildscapes that contrasts starkly with an urban coastline and one of the busiest port complexes in Europe. With an international perspective and exceptional economic strengths, Liverpool is recognised as one of the UK’s leading business, leisure and tourism destinations.

 

Top attractions – apart from the coast!

However long is spent in Liverpool, the itinerary will be jam-packed with things to see and do. It is difficult out a single set of attractions due to the multiple attractions and values. These range from outstanding architecture, first class shopping in high class designer outlets, sporting attractions and world class culture and arts venues. One might start with a visit to the famous Albert Dock, where you’ll find the Tate Liverpool, the Merseyside Maritime Museum and the award-winning Beatles Story. Popular culture makes the most of the ‘Fab Four’ making it possible to take a Liverpool Beatles tour and discover the Cavern Club, Mendips, 20 Forthlin Road, and other locations that led the Beatles to Abbey Road.

 

Arts and Culture

Liverpool city is soaked in culture, and has one of the most impressive collections of museums and galleries in Europe. The city’s national museums are outstanding; World Museum Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery, The Conservation Centre, The Maritime Museum and the Museum of Liverpool all provide a fascinating insight into the city and its links to the world – see http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/. The Walker Art museum houses works by Hockney, Degas, Turner and Rembrandt. The city’s arts scene is firmly at the forefront – the brilliantly cool FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) is the UK's leading media arts centre and features everything from provocative arts projects to the latest Hollywood blockbusters.

 

Music and Nightlife

Music is the beating heart of Liverpool. The Capital of Pop is most famous for giving us the Beatles, and the Cavern Club Liverpool is a must for any fan of the Fab Four. There are major live music hotspots like Liverpool Academy, Bumper, and Magnet. The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra is the UK's oldest surviving professional symphony orchestra based in the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. The Beatles museum is a must for Beatles fans.

 

Sport

Liverpool is a sports-mad city. The city is home to two of the Premier League’s biggest football teams – Liverpool FC and Everton FC. But it’s not all about football. There are three Royal Links courses (coastal dune golf courses) on England’s Golf Coast stretching from the Wirral peninsula north to the Fylde, along with at least another 5 coastal dune links courses.

 

Shopping

Liverpool is a very stylish city. Liverpool ONE in the heart of the city is a brilliant shopping centre that houses more than 160 famous high street names, from John Lewis to Apple, Topshop to Cath Kidston. For a touch of luxury there are the shopping centres Cavern Walks or Metquarter, where brands like Vivienne Westwood, Jo Malone, L.K. Bennett and Tommy Hilfiger are found.

 

History and Heritage

Liverpool’s history stretches back over 800 years, covering everything from maritime trading to Beatlemania. The city’s history as one of the world’s great ports earned its designated UNESCO World Heritage Site status in 2004. There’s no better way to learn about this story of Liverpool than a visit to the city’s national museums; World Museum Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery, The Conservation Centre, The Maritime Museum and the Museum of Liverpool all provide a fascinating insight into the city and its links to the world.

 

The Venue - Liverpool Hope University

Littoral 2017 will be based mainly in the EDEN building, located on the Hope Park Campus. It provides a range of spaces which will allow the conference to function suitably whilst also meeting needs of the delegates. For larger presentations, the Lecture Theatre Complex will also be used as well as the EDEN Lecture Theatre

Accommodation for the conference will be in the form of Halls of Residence and also an upgrade option to the University 4* hotel. Please visit the University website for further details. 

 

Welcome

Littoral 2017 Conference 

Welcome to the website for the Littoral 2017 Conference 

5th - 7th September 2017

Liverpool Hope University

 

We are pleased to announce our three-day international conference and excursions exploring the anthropocene and the littoral, with particular reference to the themes of 'change, naturalness and people'. The conference will seek to examine how humans and human processes influence the littoral, and how these influences may now be viewed as natural, as much as any other natural processes.

The theme will gather all disciplines to explore current issues of relevance to the coast and will be of interest to a wide spectrum of scientists , including those from the physical sciences, climate change scientists and ecologists, social scientists, engineers, policy makers and advisers and practitioners. 

The official language of the conference will be English and translation facilities will not be available.

UPDATE 14th July 2017

Following a successful initial calls for sessions and papers the programme for the conference is now available.

At this late stage, if you wish to submit an abstract for an oral paper or poster paper, or wish to propose a session, please e-mail materials to littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

Key dates

  •  The provisional programme is now published. Updates will appear so please check the programme on a regular basis
  • "Early bird" prices are available until Friday 14th July 2017, by which date all those listed on the conference programme and attending (e.g. convenors, chairs, presenting authors) should be registered.

For more information, please email: littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

We look forward to welcoming you to the fantastic city of Liverpool!

Twitter: @Littoral_2017

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Littoral-2017-572369719582006/

 

Abstract Submission Guidelines

Please provide a clear title for your proposed paper, you name(s), affiliations and an e-mail contact for the corresponding author. Also provide between 5 and 10 key words or phrases. The main body of the abstract for your proposed paper should not exceed the 350 words. Submit proposals by e-mail to littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

 

Session Proposal Guidelines

Please provide a clear title for your proposed session, the name(s) of the convenor(s), affiliations and an e-mail contact for the lead convenor. Also provide a brief description (250 word maximum) of the theme / topic of the session together with an indication of the duration of your proposed session for the conference programme. Please identify any special facilities you may require, e.g. audio-visual. Submit proposals by e-mail to littoral2017@hope.ac.uk

Programme

LITTORAL 2017 PROGRAAME (updated 14th July)

Monday 4th September

  • Pre-conference EUCC business meeting(s)
  • Pre-conference  optional social event (free event - e-mail littoral2017@hope.ac.uk if you would like to attend)

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Tuesday 5th September

  • 9 – 9.30 am - Registration
  • 9.30 – 9.40 am - Welcome and Opening Address

Open Session – 9.40 – 11.00am

ChairPaul Rooney, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Liverpool Hope University, UK

Accepted oral presentations (as 10th July)

  • Window dressing: post-Azure Window collapse in Gozo - Prof John A. Schembri, Department of Geography, University of Malta, Malta
  • Constructing Co-existence: Human Naturalness and the Ascendancy of Landscape Architecture - Alex Heid, MLA and Christopher Tallman, MLA - Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota, USA
  • An analysis of  the effects of sea level rise on the breeding habitat of Terns in the Wadden Sea- Rogier Bakker, Anne te Koppele, Theo Vreugdenhil, Ruben de Vries and Leo Bentvelzen - Van Hall Larenstein, University of Applied Sciences , The Netherlands
  • Old plantations of stone pine (Pinus pinea) compromise the conservation of coastal Atlantic wet heaths. Results of clear-cutting and effects on soil and non-target plants (LIFE13/NAT/ES/000586) - Juan García-de-Lomas, Laura Fernández-Carrillo, María D. Cobo, Concepción Saavedra, Ildefonso Martín and Carmen Rodríguez, Spain

 

Coffee Break – 11.00 – 11.20am

 

11.20am  – 12.40 pm Session theme - Invasive Alien Species in Coastal Dunes

Overview – The sustainable management/control of invasive alien species is one of the major challenges for conservation management, including for coastal dunes. The arrival, establishment, spread and invasion of alien species is an ongoing process, driven by the continuous import of new species. Furthermore, the range expansion of  alien species in southern countries also has to be considered. Coastal managers need effective early warning systems for new naturalising species, up to date information and data on invasive species in dunes and effective, sustainable (successful in the long term) management techniques. International cooperation and exchange of knowledge and field experiences are essential to increase invasive species awareness across administrative boundaries.

In many countries, national web-portals dealing with invasive species of countrywide importance are available. In Europe a continental information system exists to support the implementation of new invasive species regulation. These systems can provide useful tools for horizon scanning and risk assessment. However, none of them are targeted towards dune ecosystems. Hence, to deal with the specific context of dune invasions and potential solutions, a European dune platform is required.

Coastal dunes all over Europe are characterised by a number of similar issues related to invasive species which differ substantially from inland situations. Decisions on management priorities and methods need to be evidence-based and must be taken transparently using established methods. In addition, awareness raising to increase the public’s invasion literacy is needed to support the acceptance and understanding of sometimes drastic management methods. Alongside this adequate monitoring systems are essential to survey the distribution and spread of alien species, the evaluation of management measures and to report on the state of invasions in dune ecosystems.

In the session, examples of early warning systems, public information, success and failures in relation to control, as well as monitoring programs are presented from a regional up to an international scale. The aim of the session is to foster knowledge exchange on invasive alien species in dune ecosystems and to bring on ideas towards an international community of practice. Presentations are welcome which address the issues.

Convenors (Chair tbc)-

  • Dr Maike Isermann, Bremen University, Vegetation Ecology, Bremen, Germany
  • Tim Adriaens, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium
  • Luc Geelen, Waternet, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Sam Provoost, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium
  • Uffe Strandby, Ministry of Environment and Food, Nature Agency, Denmark

Accepted oral presentations (as 10th July)

  • Invasive alien plants in European Atlantic and Baltic coastal dunes - overview of the scientific background. Maike Isermann Bremen University, Germany
  • Invasive Alien Species in Dunes: examples from the North Holland dunes  - Dick Groenendijk, PWN Water Supply Company North Holland, The Netherlands.
  • Invasive Alien Species in Dunes:  showcase  Prunus serotina in the Amsterdam Dunes – Luc Geelen, Waternet, The Netherlands
  • Sisal (Agave sisalana) invasion of arborescent matorrals with Ziziphus in Almería (southern Spain): integrating nature conservation and particular feelings of local communities (LIFE13/NAT/ES/000586) - Laura Fernández-Carrillo, Carmen Rodríguez, Fernando J. Sanz, Hedwig Schwarzer, José L. Caparrós, Juan García-de-Lomas  and Montserrat Sanchez. Spain

 

12.40 -2.00pm Buffet Lunch with Poster Papers and Displays

 

2.00 - Session theme -  Threats and solutions in dunes and dune slacks 

Overview - Dune grassland and dune slack wetlands are designated a priority habitat in Europe, but are currently in ‘unfavourable bad’ condition. In other areas around the globe dune habitats are also under threat, resulting in loss and degradation of this valuable habitat. The main pressures and threats include habitat loss, nitrogen pollution, invasive alien species, climate change and recreation pressures. Conservation measures include re-instating appropriate management techniques, including use of natural dynamics, managing local hydrological conditions exploring new options for restoring these habitats.

Chair - Dr Laurence Jones / Camiel Aggenbach

Accepted oral presentations (as 14th July)

  • Bringing science into sand dune restoration funding bids: challenges, opportunities and lessons learned so far -  Sue Rees, Senior Environmental Specialist, Specialist Services and Programmes Team, Natural England, UK
  • What is the effect of grazing by rabbits and livestock on vegetation development compared with seven exclosures? - Harrie GJM van der Hagen (Dune Water Company of South Holland and Department of Environmental Science, Wageningen University) , Nils van Rooijen (Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity Conservation, KU Leuven) and Prof. Dr Joop HJ Schaminée (Wageningen University and the Radboud University, Nijmegen) – The Netherlands
  • Does atmospheric nitrogen deposition lead to greater nitrogen and carbon accumulation in coastal sand dunes?  - Camiel J.S. Aggenbach,  Yuki Fujita (KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands), Annemiek Kooijman (Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics [IBED], University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Dr Mark van Til (Waternet Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Harrie G.J.M. van der Hagen (Dune Water Company of South Holland and Department of Environmental Science, Wageningen University), David Cooper and Dr Laurence Jones (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK)
  • Testing botanical indicators for nitrogen enrichment in large scale atmospheric nitrogen gradients in dry dune grassland in the UK - Dr Laurence Jones and Carly Stevens (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK)

3.20 – 3.40 pm Coffee Break

  • Thirty years of change for Scottish sand dunes – Prof Robin Pakeman, The James Hutton Institute, UK
  • Dry dune grasslands and climate change: what to expect? Yuki Fujtia, R.P. Bartholomeus  (KWR Watercycle Research Institute, The Netherlands) and Witte, J.P.M. (KWR Watercycle Research Institute and VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Great Lakes dunes: effects of periodic variations in lake levels and local influences on the ecohydrology of a Lake Michigan coastal slack - Suzanne DeVries-Zimmerman, Hope College, Michigan USA
  • Groundwater nutrient impacts on dune slack vegetation - Laurence Jones (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK) and Jennifer Rhymes (Manchester University, UK)
  • Quantifying the influence of rainfall interception on dune slack hydrological regime: implications for management - Charlie Stratford, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK

5.00pm Plenary and Introduction to Field Trips on Wednesday 6th September

 

* Evening - Conference Dinner on Hope Park campus (additional fee applies to be paid on registration for the conference).

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Wednesday 6th September - Field trips

Delegates select one option for the field trips. Packed lunch provided.

Option 1 - Mersey Gateway Project

Facilitators – The Mersey Gateway Project team, led by Paul Oldfield, Environment and Biodiversity Manager

In autumn this year, the Mersey Gateway Project — a £1.89 billion scheme incorporating a new six-lane toll bridge over the River Mersey — will open.

With an extensive saltmarsh restoration scheme on both sides of the estuary, the Mersey Gateway scheme is a unique green project that will bring major environmental benefits to the local area, and environmental issues have been a key focus since the project was first developed.

The project has an innovative approach to mitigation - the Mersey Gateway Environmental Trust (MGET) is an independent charitable trust that has been established to create a new 28.5 hectare nature reserve around the bridge. It also aims to increase the bird and wildlife population of the Upper Mersey Estuary and secure additional funding for environmental initiatives in the area over the next 30 years.

 

Option 2 – Formby Dunes

Facilitators – The National Trust team, led by Andrew Brockbank , Countryside Manager

The Formby coast is one of the most accessible parts of the Sefton Coast sand dune system with car parks at Lifeboat Road and Victoria Road and regular links via Merseyrail to nearby stations at Formby and Freshfield. The beginnings of an integrated approach to coastal management at Formby were put in place with the establishment of the Sefton Coast Management Scheme in 1978. Large scale restoration took place to stabilise frontal dunes, improve parking, access and provision of informal recreation facilities and manage woodland plantations. Nearly 40 years later the Formby coast is cherished as a favourite seaside destination for locals, and visitors from much further afield - 555,000 annual visits place considerable demands on the dune landscape and facilities with approximately 85% arriving by car. Parts of the area remain under pressure from use by people and investment in visitor and recreation management, sustainable access and infrastructure is required to help build the resilience of the coast

The visit will provide an opportunity to walk across Formby Point to witness this dramatic landscape from the relatively stable and accreting dunes at Ravenmeols LNR to the dynamic exposed section of shifting dunes and sand sheets closer to Victoria Road. The National Trust has begun a programme of local community involvement to better understand current issues and needs and guide investment in facilities which will enhance visitor experience and build support for improved coastal conservation.

 

  • Evening - Informal social event – Liverpool city centre

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Thursday 7th September

  • 9 – 9.15 am - Registration
  • 9.15 – 9.20 am - Welcome and Opening Address for the Final Day

 

9.20 – 10.20am Open session

 

Chair – Rev Prof David Chester, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Liverpool Hope University, UK

Accepted oral presentations (as 10th July)

  • Spatial and temporal patterns of two crab species (Carcinus maenas and Cancer pagurus) on intertidal rocky shores of the Irish Sea - Fikret Öndes, Faculty of Fisheries, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Turkey
  • The human security implications of Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in littoral communities in Bonny Island, Nigeria - Ifesinachi Okafor-Yarwood, King's College, UK
  • Seasonal dynamics of amphipods associated with mussel facies in Izmir Bay (Aegean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean) – Dr Fikret Öndes, Faculty of Fisheries, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Turkey

 

10.20 – 10.40am Coffee Break

 

  • IMPACT Project of INTERREG Europe and its Impact on Coastal and Marine Protected Areas in Lithuania – Dr Ramūnas Povilanskas, EUCC Baltic Office, Lithuania
  • Spatial planning for the sustainable expansion of wind energy: perspectives of a coastal area in southern Brazil -  Carlos Vinicius da Cruz Weissa (Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio Grande do Sul [IFRS], Brazil) Paulo Roberto Armanini Tagliania, Jean Marcel de Almeida Espinozab, Lucas Terres de Limaa and Tiago Borges Ribeiro Gandraba (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande [FURG], Brazil)
  • Current status of marine and coastal protected areas in Turkey – Dr Fikret Öndes (Faculty of Fisheries, Izmir Kâtip Çelebi University, Turkey) and Dr Harun Güçlüsoy (Institute of Marine Sciences and Technology, Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey)
  • Future scenarios in the land use of the Rio Grande Do Sol plain (Brazil) using the Molusce Platform: applicability in coastal management studies- Lucas Lima and Cristina Bernardes,  Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Geoscience Department, University of Aveiro, Portugal

 

12.00 – 1.00 – Buffet Lunch with Poster Papers and Displays

 

1.00 – 2.30pm Session theme - Marine Planning: achieving progress across boundaries, theories, and sectors towards sustainability

Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) an important tool for the sustainable management of the European littoral and seas.  In this session we will seek to take stock of progress in MSP and consider some of the key governance challenges which remain.  Firstly, we will consider the possibilities for transboundary and supranational co-operation, an important issue as many European marine systems are shared across jurisdictions.  Secondly, we will explore the challenges for effective planning processes, particularly the evaluation and monitoring phase and related debates about what MSP is designed to achieve.  Ecosystem-based management is a key paradigm for European marine planning, reflected in many national policies and international agreements.  At the same time, a debate has emerged about a range of theoretical framings, including more radical conceptulisations of marine planning.  Thirdly, we will consider the levels of sectoral and scientific involvement in marine planning.  The marine planning systems which have recently emerged across Europe contrast in terms of their regulatory powers, and level of involvement of different sectors or influence on other initiatives. The session will draw lessons from European experience about the possibilities for increasing scientific input, stakeholder engagement and institutional coherence, in order to work towards sustainability. 

Convenors and Chairs:

  • Dr L McGowan, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Liverpool, UK
  • Dr T A Stojanovic, School of Geography and Sustainable Development, University of St Andrews, UK

Accepted oral presentations (by 10th July)

  • Governance Frameworks for Marine Planning - Dr Timothy A Stojanovic School of Geography and Sustainable Development, and Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, UK
  • Capturing the Transnational Dimension in Scenarios for Maritime Spatial Planning - Lynne McGowan, Stephen Jay, Sue Kidd, Charlotte Billingham and Charlotte Hopkins, Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
  • The MSP Directive and a new era of ICM? - Sue Kidd,  Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
  • Evaluating Marine Spatial Planning - Charlotte Hopkins Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK

2.30 – 2.50 – Coffee Break

2.50 – 5.10pm Session theme - Mobile dunes and dune dynamics

Overview: Dunes are naturally dynamic, and the mobile phases include the beach-dune transition zone, embryo dunes, foredunes, mobile dunes and secondary blowouts. This dynamism is essential to maintain many rare dune species. Significant pressures and threats include coastal engineering works, tourism development, recreational activities and invasive alien species, and changes in climate which can all interfere with natural dynamics. Restoration approaches include re-instating dune dynamics through managed de-stabilisation and increasing connectivity with the beach. Long-term successful solutions require engagement with site managers, the public, as well as shoreline management (sea defence and coast protection) agencies. This remains a major area for the exchange of knowledge and coordination of national policy in addressing issues relating to dune dynamics and the need for climate change adaptation.

Chair - tbc

Accepted oral presentations (by 14th July)

  • Coastal Sediment Compartments as a Framework for Australian Coastal Management - Prof. Colin Woodroffe,  Dr Rafael Carvalho (University of Wollongong, Australia), Dr Ian Eliot, Dr Matt Eliot (Damara WA Pty Ltd, Australia), Prof. Nick Harvey ( University of Adelaide and James Cook University, Australia), Dr David Rissik ( Griffith University , Australia), Chris Sharples (University of Tasmania, Australia), Prof. Andrew Short (University of Sydney and University of Wollongong , Australia) and Prof. Bruce Thom ( Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists, University of Sydney  and  University of Wollongong, Australia)
  • Conservation of dune habitats in the Atlantic Biogeographic Region: the roadmap for knowledge exchange and networking 2016-2020 - John Houston, Environmental Consultant, UK
  • Conservation or Preservation; the challenge of aligning scientific, public and policy understanding of dune ecosystems -  John Ratcliffe, Graham Williams, Emmer Litt and Julie Creer – Natural Resources Wales, UK
  • Exploring the spatio-temporal effects of secondary blowouts on dune soil and vegetation - Camiel J.S. Aggenbach and Yuki Fujita, Ecosystem Management Research Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Belgium
  • Incident wind flow direction directly impacts the formation and morphology of turbulent wind flow structures in the lee of parabolic dunes – Dr Thomas Smyth (Liverpool Hope University, UK), Dr Brian Yurk and Dr Edward Hansen (Hope College, Michigan, USA)
  • Great Lakes Dunes: Documenting the effects of storms as drivers of dune processes on the eastern shoreline of Lake Michigan-  Dr Brian E. Bodenbender, Dr Brian P. Yurk, Dr Clayton B. Sanders, and Dr Edward C. Hansen - Hope College, Michigan, USA
  • Resistance and resilience of coastal natural and artificial foredune communities to physical disturbance  Bass J. (Institute of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Germany), Balke T. (School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK) and Minden V. (Department of Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium)

5.10 - 5.20 pm – Closing Remarks

 * Contact the conference organisers directly on littoral2017@hope.ac.uk if you are interested in joining informal post conference excursions. Arrangements and availability will depend on demand *

Prices&Deadlines

 

"Early bird" prices - now available until Friday 14th July 2017 (updated 31st May 2017)

Full Residential Package [For arrival Tuesday 5th September 2017 and departure Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Conference Fee

-  Bed & Breakfast x 2 nights

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet lunch [Tuesday 5th and Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Hot three course evening meal [Tuesday 5th September]

- Conference Field Excursions with packed lunch [Wednesday 6th September 2017]

 

Option 1 - Single en-suite in University Halls of Residence = £435 (non-member) or £400 (EUCC member)                                        

Option 2 - Executive double en-suite in Eden Suite University Hotel = £515 (non-member) or £480 (EUCC member)

 

Non- Residential Packages

Tuesday 5th September 2017 = £100 (non-member) or £90 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Wednesday 6th September 2017 = £85 (non-member) or £70 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Field Excursions [including coach hire, packed lunch and supporting material]

- Packed Lunch

 

Thursday 7th September 2017 = £100 (non-member) or £90 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Additional Extras:

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Single en-suite University Halls of Residence = £50.00 (non-member) or £45.00 (EUCC member)

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Executive double en-suite in University Hotel = £70.00 (non-member) or £65.00 (EUCC member)

Conference Dinner Fee for Residential Delegates = £15.00

Conference Dinner Fee for Non - Residential Delegates = £40.00

 

 

Late Booking Prices - for bookings made after 14th July 2017 

Full Residential Package [For arrival Tuesday 5th September 2017 and departure Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Conference Fee

-  Bed & Breakfast x 2 nights

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet lunch [Tuesday 5th and Thursday 7th September 2017]

- Hot three course evening meal [Tuesday 5th September]

- Conference Field Excursions with packed lunch [Wednesday 6th September 2017]

 

Option 1 - Single en-suite in University Halls of Residence = £485 (non-member) or £450 (EUCC member)                                        

Option 2 - Executive double en-suite in Eden Suite University Hotel = £565 (non-member) or £530 (EUCC member)

 

Non- Residential Packages

Tuesday 5th September 2017 = £120 (non-member) or £110 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Wednesday 6th September 2017 = £105 (non-member) or £90 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Field Excursions [including coach hire, packed lunch and supporting material]

- Packed Lunch

 

Thursday 7th September 2017 = £120 (non-member) or £110 (EUCC member)

- Conference Fee

- Tea and Coffee Breaks

- Buffet Lunch

 

Additional Extras:

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Single en-suite University Halls of Residence = £60.00 (non-member) or £55.00 (EUCC member)

Bed & Breakfast for Monday 4th September 2017 in Executive double en-suite in University Hotel = £80.00 (non-member) or £75.00 (EUCC member)

Conference Dinner Fee for Residential Delegates = £20.00

Conference Dinner Fee for Non - Residential Delegates = £45.00

 

** PLEASE NOTE THERE ARE A LIMITED NUMBER OF ROOMS AVAILABLE IN THE EDEN SUITE AND THESE WILL BE ALLOCATED ON A FIRST-COME FIRST-SERVED BASIS **

 

To register to attend this event please click here, where you will be redirected to the University Online Store.

Organizing Partners

  • Liverpool Hope University and the Faculty of Science

The Littoral 2017 conference is hosted by Liverpool Hope University, Faculty of Science. Liverpool Hope University is the only ecumenical university in Europe. It is shaped by Christian principles but embraces those of all faiths and none. The Faculty of Science contains the Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Department of Psychology and the School of Health Sciences.

Littoral 2017 is organised by the ‘Sand Dune and Shingle Network’ http://coast.hope.ac.uk/  based in the Department of Geography and Environmental Science at Liverpool Hope University. The aim of the ‘Sand Dune and Shingle Network’ is to conserve sand dunes and shingle as dynamic landscapes. The network seeks to achieve this by:-

  • Encouraging people to value and understand the habitats.
  • Championing the habitats.
  • Facilitating an exchange of knowledge and support actions that are beneficial
  • Making the Network an active community of participants, and a recognised source of expertise and authority at the global level.

This initiative builds on the results of networking, highlights projects and publications, and develops opportunities for conferences, study tours and workshops. It also took the lead in developing, and operates as part of, a European Dune Network and works closely with the Coastal & Marine Union (EUCC).

 

The Littoral 2017 conference is one of a series of events stemming from the Coastal & Marine Union (EUCC). Coastal & Marine Union (EUCC) is a non profit organization with a membership of around 500 institutions, NGOs and experts, in 40 countries. Its network at large involves about 2500 professionals involved in coastal and marine management issues. EUCC has been organizing bi-annual conferences since 1987 implementing its network’s mission namely “bringing together the scientific community, coastal practitioners and policy makers”. Until 1999, the conference was organized uniquely by EUCC under the name “Coastlines”, and later on it joined forces with Eurocoast, an association mainly concerned by the technical aspects of coastal processes, thus giving birth to the ‘Littoral’ conferences in 2002.

 

The Commission on Coastal Systems encourages the study of coastal systems throughout the world. The Commission sponsors and supports activities leading to the exchange of information regarding coastal systems among our members and throughout the IGU at large. The focus of attention is on interactive systems, both human and physical, and the areas of inquiry include issues such as sea-level rise, land-use changes, estuarine resources, coastal tourism and shoreline development, coastal recreation, and coastal zone management. The Commission will make concerted efforts to emphasize issues of Global Change.

 

  • Hope College, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences

https://hope.edu/academic/geology/department/

Hope College is a four-year liberal arts college in Michigan, USA, where academic excellence and vibrant Christian faith join together in a supportive and welcoming community. Hope’s campus is nestled in the heart of downtown Holland, just miles from Lake Michigan. The Geological and Environmental Sciences Department offers a Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, and a minor in Geology, and also a minor in Environmental Science. Academics from the department work closely on research dune projects with colleagues from Liverpool Hope University’s Department of Geography and Environmental Science.

 

  • The National Trust (Field trip provider for this conference)

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/

The National Trust is a conservation organisation in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom. The trust describes itself as "a charity that works to preserve and protect historic places and spaces—for ever, for everyone." The National Trust is the largest private landowner in the United Kingdom. It owns or protects roughly one fifth of the coastline in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (775 miles), and has a long-term campaign, Project Neptune, which seeks to acquire more.

 

  • Mersey Gateway Environmental Trust (Field trip provider for this conference)

http://www.merseygateway.co.uk/mersey-gateway-environmental-trust/

The Mersey Gateway Environmental Trust (MGET) is an independent Charitable Trust set up in 2010 to promote the conservation, protection and improvement of the environment across a 1600 hectare area of the Upper Mersey Estuary running all the way from the Mersey Gateway Bridge up river as far as Warrington. The Trust aims to create a new 28.5 hectare nature reserve around the bridge.

 

  • Other Acknowledgements

Thank you to the many coastal colleagues who have helped to organise and promote this event. They are too numerous to name individually here. Their names and organisations are included in the conference programme.

 

 

 

 

Liverpool&The Venue

Liverpool is a global city, one that’s proud of its heritage and culture but also passionate about looking to the future. This makes it an exciting, inspiring and exhilarating place to host Littoral 2016. The Liverpool city region is of international importance with the Dee Estuary SAC, Mersey Estuary SAC , Sefton Coast SAC and the Ribble Estuary SAC. These sites are between 10 minutes and 1 hour travel time of the conference venue. The coast of Liverpool offers an amazing combination of near natural estuary and sand dune wildscapes that contrasts starkly with an urban coastline and one of the busiest port complexes in Europe. With an international perspective and exceptional economic strengths, Liverpool is recognised as one of the UK’s leading business, leisure and tourism destinations.

 

Top attractions – apart from the coast!

However long is spent in Liverpool, the itinerary will be jam-packed with things to see and do. It is difficult out a single set of attractions due to the multiple attractions and values. These range from outstanding architecture, first class shopping in high class designer outlets, sporting attractions and world class culture and arts venues. One might start with a visit to the famous Albert Dock, where you’ll find the Tate Liverpool, the Merseyside Maritime Museum and the award-winning Beatles Story. Popular culture makes the most of the ‘Fab Four’ making it possible to take a Liverpool Beatles tour and discover the Cavern Club, Mendips, 20 Forthlin Road, and other locations that led the Beatles to Abbey Road.

 

Arts and Culture

Liverpool city is soaked in culture, and has one of the most impressive collections of museums and galleries in Europe. The city’s national museums are outstanding; World Museum Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery, The Conservation Centre, The Maritime Museum and the Museum of Liverpool all provide a fascinating insight into the city and its links to the world – see http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/. The Walker Art museum houses works by Hockney, Degas, Turner and Rembrandt. The city’s arts scene is firmly at the forefront – the brilliantly cool FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) is the UK's leading media arts centre and features everything from provocative arts projects to the latest Hollywood blockbusters.

 

Music and Nightlife

Music is the beating heart of Liverpool. The Capital of Pop is most famous for giving us the Beatles, and the Cavern Club Liverpool is a must for any fan of the Fab Four. There are major live music hotspots like Liverpool Academy, Bumper, and Magnet. The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra is the UK's oldest surviving professional symphony orchestra based in the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. The Beatles museum is a must for Beatles fans.

 

Sport

Liverpool is a sports-mad city. The city is home to two of the Premier League’s biggest football teams – Liverpool FC and Everton FC. But it’s not all about football. There are three Royal Links courses (coastal dune golf courses) on England’s Golf Coast stretching from the Wirral peninsula north to the Fylde, along with at least another 5 coastal dune links courses.

 

Shopping

Liverpool is a very stylish city. Liverpool ONE in the heart of the city is a brilliant shopping centre that houses more than 160 famous high street names, from John Lewis to Apple, Topshop to Cath Kidston. For a touch of luxury there are the shopping centres Cavern Walks or Metquarter, where brands like Vivienne Westwood, Jo Malone, L.K. Bennett and Tommy Hilfiger are found.

 

History and Heritage

Liverpool’s history stretches back over 800 years, covering everything from maritime trading to Beatlemania. The city’s history as one of the world’s great ports earned its designated UNESCO World Heritage Site status in 2004. There’s no better way to learn about this story of Liverpool than a visit to the city’s national museums; World Museum Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery, The Conservation Centre, The Maritime Museum and the Museum of Liverpool all provide a fascinating insight into the city and its links to the world.

 

The Venue - Liverpool Hope University

Littoral 2017 will be based mainly in the EDEN building, located on the Hope Park Campus. It provides a range of spaces which will allow the conference to function suitably whilst also meeting needs of the delegates. For larger presentations, the Lecture Theatre Complex will also be used as well as the EDEN Lecture Theatre

Accommodation for the conference will be in the form of Halls of Residence and also an upgrade option to the University 4* hotel. Please visit the University website for further details.