Disability Studies & Philosophy of Education (MA) Study Liverpool Hope University,Study,Postgraduate Taught,Postgraduate Courses

Disability Studies and Philosophy of Education (MA)

Duration: 12 months (full-time); 27 months (part-time)

Overview

* This course qualifies for the New £10,000 Postgraduate Loan Scheme (PGL)

The MA Disability Studies and Philosophy of Education programme is designed for practising teachers, educators and others with a personal or professional interest in the field of education. The programme aims to provide opportunities for engagement with the key theories, concepts and ideas in education.

This programme is part of the ‘Interdisciplinary Studies in Education’ suite of research-informed Masters provision. It offers each student a choice of awards that means they can tailor the available provision to their own research interests.

By studying at Liverpool Hope University, you will be joining an academic community with a strong record in educational research. You will study in a supportive learning environment and be encouraged to develop your own research profile.

Curriculum

The full Masters award requires you to gain 180 credits, including a dissertation. The curriculum is constructed from 60-credit ‘Blocks’ of provision, from which students will choose two of the combinations permitted. Each 60-credit Block comprises either two 30-credit or four 15-credit modules.

Disability Studies block
Term 1

Critical Disability Theory (30 credits)

Focusing on critical theory from the modern and postmodern eras, this module provides a basis for an interrogation of Disability Studies and Special Educational Needs. From Freud to Foucault, Goffman to Garland-Thomson, Derrida to Davis, McRuer to Murray, and so on, the module follows the progression of critical disability theory from the early twentieth century to the present day. Though explicitly theoretical, the content of the module is grounded in experiential knowledge. Concepts such as stigma, the normate, panopticism, normalcy, narrative prosthesis, dismodernism, crip theory, aesthetic nervousness, autistic presence, and the metanarrative of blindness are explored in relation to social, cultural, and individual attitudes toward impairment, disability and education.

Term 2

Modelling Disability (30 credits)

Disability has been conceptualised in many ways and for many purposes. In the past it tended to be non-disabled people who were responsible for the conceptualising and theorising of disability. In recent years, however, thanks largely to disability activism, disabled people have taken control of the ways in which disability is modelled. In order to gain a better idea of what is meant by disability, the module takes a critical journey through religious, charity, medical, social, affirmative, cultural, and other models of disability.

Philosophy in Education block

Term 1

Core Philosophers of Education (15 credits)

This module examines the development of philosophy of education from a historical perspective.  The approach taken in this module is similar to that of 'history of ideas' modules in philosophy courses where a range of historical figures from philosophy of education will be discussed.  Students will engage with historical figures such as Plato, Hegel, Rousseau, Buber, Dewey and more modern thinkers such as Arendt and Freire.  In this module students will critically engage with these philosopher's views on education. 

Philosophical Methods (15 credits)

This module allows students to explore methodological issues in philosophy, with particular emphasis placed on the philosophy of education. Tensions between different traditions in philosophy are explored, alongside issues from the philosophy of science. The question of whether theoretical, philosophical methods are comparable to empirical, scientific methods is investigated. 

Term 2

Moral Development Theory (15 credits)

This module enables students to explore a range of theories and approaches related to the development and acquisition of moral values, with a particular focus on approaches which span the inter-disciplinary space between philosophy and psychology. Pedagogical strategies to moral and philosophical education are explored with reference to theorists such as Lawrence Kohlberg and Jonathan Haidt.

Critical and Radical Pedagogies (15 credits)

This module examines the revolutionary tendencies in educational theory. Rather than see educational change as a process of iterative reform, critical and radical pedagogies considers radical and revolutionary change. Through analysis of the limitations of current theory and practice, this module will explore the alternative visions of education from theorists such as Paulo Freire, Henry Giroux, Michael Apple, Herbert Marcuse, A. S. Neill, John Holt, J. Krishnamurti and others. The module will also critically examine some of the current practices in education such as the use of silence and attention, and programmes such as ‘philosophy for children’ and ‘mindfulness in schools’.

After completion of the taught phase (when both Blocks are completed and 120 credits has been successfully gained) then students will begin the research phase, whereby they will study a Research Methods module and then embark on a Dissertation that synthesises the two Blocks that they have studied. 

Entry Requirements

Normally a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours Degree in a relevant discipline.

Applications from students who do not hold a 1st or 2:1 Honours Degree (or equivalent) will be asked to demonstrate potential to achieve a Masters award via a sample of academic writing and interview before an offer is made.

Please note that a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (formally the Criminal Records Bureau – CRB) is required for students where they are required to visit settings other than their own.

For students whose first language is not English there is a language requirement of IELTS 6.5 overall (reading 6, writing 6), TOEFL ibt 87, or other equivalent recognised English language qualification. For additional information including entry requirements from your country, fees and scholarships go to the International section of the website.

Teaching & Research

Research in the Faculty of Education is organised around two centres and research fora / groups:

Students taking a Masters in the Education Faculty may find their work aligns with any or several of these groups, as the award is designed to allow individuals to study areas of education and teaching and learning in a wide variety of settings and contexts.

 

Employability

You will be able to structure your award to enhance your personal interests, career specific opportunities and potential for promotion to senior management and leadership. It will enable you to evaluate adult's and children's learning through research and postgraduate study. For teachers, this course will enhance opportunities to move beyond the threshold and become an 'excellent teacher'.

Students completing the MA will also be well placed to go on to a doctorate (EdD or PhD) at Liverpool Hope.

Overview

* This course qualifies for the New £10,000 Postgraduate Loan Scheme (PGL)

The MA Disability Studies and Philosophy of Education programme is designed for practising teachers, educators and others with a personal or professional interest in the field of education. The programme aims to provide opportunities for engagement with the key theories, concepts and ideas in education.

This programme is part of the ‘Interdisciplinary Studies in Education’ suite of research-informed Masters provision. It offers each student a choice of awards that means they can tailor the available provision to their own research interests.

By studying at Liverpool Hope University, you will be joining an academic community with a strong record in educational research. You will study in a supportive learning environment and be encouraged to develop your own research profile.

Curriculum

The full Masters award requires you to gain 180 credits, including a dissertation. The curriculum is constructed from 60-credit ‘Blocks’ of provision, from which students will choose two of the combinations permitted. Each 60-credit Block comprises either two 30-credit or four 15-credit modules.

Disability Studies block
Term 1

Critical Disability Theory (30 credits)

Focusing on critical theory from the modern and postmodern eras, this module provides a basis for an interrogation of Disability Studies and Special Educational Needs. From Freud to Foucault, Goffman to Garland-Thomson, Derrida to Davis, McRuer to Murray, and so on, the module follows the progression of critical disability theory from the early twentieth century to the present day. Though explicitly theoretical, the content of the module is grounded in experiential knowledge. Concepts such as stigma, the normate, panopticism, normalcy, narrative prosthesis, dismodernism, crip theory, aesthetic nervousness, autistic presence, and the metanarrative of blindness are explored in relation to social, cultural, and individual attitudes toward impairment, disability and education.

Term 2

Modelling Disability (30 credits)

Disability has been conceptualised in many ways and for many purposes. In the past it tended to be non-disabled people who were responsible for the conceptualising and theorising of disability. In recent years, however, thanks largely to disability activism, disabled people have taken control of the ways in which disability is modelled. In order to gain a better idea of what is meant by disability, the module takes a critical journey through religious, charity, medical, social, affirmative, cultural, and other models of disability.

Philosophy in Education block

Term 1

Core Philosophers of Education (15 credits)

This module examines the development of philosophy of education from a historical perspective.  The approach taken in this module is similar to that of 'history of ideas' modules in philosophy courses where a range of historical figures from philosophy of education will be discussed.  Students will engage with historical figures such as Plato, Hegel, Rousseau, Buber, Dewey and more modern thinkers such as Arendt and Freire.  In this module students will critically engage with these philosopher's views on education. 

Philosophical Methods (15 credits)

This module allows students to explore methodological issues in philosophy, with particular emphasis placed on the philosophy of education. Tensions between different traditions in philosophy are explored, alongside issues from the philosophy of science. The question of whether theoretical, philosophical methods are comparable to empirical, scientific methods is investigated. 

Term 2

Moral Development Theory (15 credits)

This module enables students to explore a range of theories and approaches related to the development and acquisition of moral values, with a particular focus on approaches which span the inter-disciplinary space between philosophy and psychology. Pedagogical strategies to moral and philosophical education are explored with reference to theorists such as Lawrence Kohlberg and Jonathan Haidt.

Critical and Radical Pedagogies (15 credits)

This module examines the revolutionary tendencies in educational theory. Rather than see educational change as a process of iterative reform, critical and radical pedagogies considers radical and revolutionary change. Through analysis of the limitations of current theory and practice, this module will explore the alternative visions of education from theorists such as Paulo Freire, Henry Giroux, Michael Apple, Herbert Marcuse, A. S. Neill, John Holt, J. Krishnamurti and others. The module will also critically examine some of the current practices in education such as the use of silence and attention, and programmes such as ‘philosophy for children’ and ‘mindfulness in schools’.

After completion of the taught phase (when both Blocks are completed and 120 credits has been successfully gained) then students will begin the research phase, whereby they will study a Research Methods module and then embark on a Dissertation that synthesises the two Blocks that they have studied. 

Entry Requirements

Normally a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours Degree in a relevant discipline.

Applications from students who do not hold a 1st or 2:1 Honours Degree (or equivalent) will be asked to demonstrate potential to achieve a Masters award via a sample of academic writing and interview before an offer is made.

Please note that a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (formally the Criminal Records Bureau – CRB) is required for students where they are required to visit settings other than their own.

For students whose first language is not English there is a language requirement of IELTS 6.5 overall (reading 6, writing 6), TOEFL ibt 87, or other equivalent recognised English language qualification. For additional information including entry requirements from your country, fees and scholarships go to the International section of the website.

Teaching & Research

Research in the Faculty of Education is organised around two centres and research fora / groups:

Students taking a Masters in the Education Faculty may find their work aligns with any or several of these groups, as the award is designed to allow individuals to study areas of education and teaching and learning in a wide variety of settings and contexts.

 

Employability

You will be able to structure your award to enhance your personal interests, career specific opportunities and potential for promotion to senior management and leadership. It will enable you to evaluate adult's and children's learning through research and postgraduate study. For teachers, this course will enhance opportunities to move beyond the threshold and become an 'excellent teacher'.

Students completing the MA will also be well placed to go on to a doctorate (EdD or PhD) at Liverpool Hope.

Course Contact Details

Student Recruitment Team

t: +44 (0) 151 291 3111

e: enquiry@hope.ac.uk

Faculty: Education

t: +44 (0) 151 291 3410

e: educationpgt@hope.ac.uk

How to Apply