Special Educational Needs (MA) Study Liverpool Hope University,Study,Postgraduate Taught,Postgraduate Courses

Special Educational Needs (MA)

Duration: 12 months (full-time); 27 months (part-time)

Overview

* This course qualifies for the New £10,000 Postgraduate Loan Scheme (PGL)

The MA Special Educational Needs has been designed to meet and extend the interests and requirements of professionals in all kinds of educational contexts, from early years to post-compulsory settings. The provision of this MA recognises a growing interest in this aspect of educational provision and the Faculty’s commitment to work for educational equality and social justice.

The degree is distinctive in drawing on Disability Studies perspectives in order to interrogate the nature and origins of the Special Educational Needs discourse. This will enable you to take a critical stance on historical and current practise enabling you to challenge implicit and damaging assumptions about the nature of Special Educational Needs and the implications for learners.

The degree is informed by the application of a Critical Disability Studies theoretical framework enabling Liverpool Hope University to offer a distinctive and critical approach to the ways in which we conceptualise and practise ‘special’ education. As part of your study you will develop your own creative and critical response to the design of an appropriate research project. A significant consideration will be the necessity of engaging with the ethics of disability research.

For further information download the Special Educational Needs MA leaflet

Curriculum

In accordance with the University’s Regulations/Guidelines on Master’s qualifications, the MA Special Educational Needs consists of a 180 credits taught postgraduate programme. The programme offers exit awards at the Postgraduate Certificate stage (60 credits) and the Postgraduate Diploma stage (120 credits). The research phase leads to completion of a dissertation through independent study with individual research supervision. To achieve the full award (180 credits) students must take a range of taught modules up to the value of 120 credits and complete the research phase, which follows a 15+45 credit model.

The modules covered include Critical Disability Theory; Disability and Professional Practice; Segregation, Integration and Inclusion; Normalising Difference in Educational Practice; Researching Disability; and a Dissertation. 

Critical Disability Theory (30 credits)

Focusing on critical theory from the modern and postmodern eras, this module provides a basis for an interrogation of Disability Studies and Special Educational Needs. From Freud to Foucault, Goffman to Garland-Thomson, Derrida to Davis, McRuer to Murray, and so on, the module follows the progression of critical disability theory from the early twentieth century to the present day. Though explicitly theoretical, the content of the module is grounded in experiential knowledge. Concepts such as stigma, the normate, panopticism, normalcy, narrative prosthesis, dismodernism, crip theory, aesthetic nervousness, autistic presence, and the metanarrative of blindness are explored in relation to social, cultural, and individual attitudes toward impairment, disability and education. 

Disability and Professional Practice (30 credits)

The relationship between disability and professional practice can be both problematic and productive. This relationship is explored in the module as an array of perspectives and expertise is considered. Training, teaching, therapy, legislation, and so on, are all manifestly praiseworthy but nonetheless warrant critical engagement. How and by whom is disability voiced within the professions? These are some of the many proactive questions that the module explores in relation to the professional context.

Segregation, Integration and Inclusion (30 credits)

As Baglieri and Knopf (2004) suggest human differences are ordinary, yet education continues to mark out some human differential characteristics as 'abnormal' and in need of 'special' education. Therefore, this module intends to map out how learner's differences have been conceptualised across time and examine the range of influences that have been significant to the changing landscape of what we now call SEN.

Normalising Difference in Educational Practice (30 Credits)
Baglieri and Knopf (2004:526) suggest that ‘active and continual effort toward the acceptance and improvement of inclusive educational practices is a possible first move towards social justice’. As such, this module aims to highlight the disabling nature of many educational structures and pedagogical practices and offer you insights into how curricula can be designed to reduce inequality and embrace human variation.

Researching Disability (15 Credits)
Disability has been conceptualised in many ways and for many purposes. In the past it tended to be non-disabled people who were responsible for the conceptualising and theorising of disability. In recent years, however, thanks largely to disability activism, disabled people have taken control of the ways in which disability is modelled. In order to gain a better idea of what is meant by disability, the module takes a critical journey through religious, charity, medical, social, affirmative, cultural, and other models of disability.

Entry Requirements

Normally a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours Degree in a relevant discipline.
Applications from students who do not hold a 1st or 2:1 Honours Degree (or equivalent) will be asked to demonstrate potential to achieve a Masters award via a sample of academic writing and interview before an offer is made.

Please note that a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (formally the Criminal Records Bureau – CRB) is required for students where they are required to visit settings other than their own.

For students whose first language is not English there is a language requirement of IELTS 6.5 overall (reading 6, writing 6), TOEFL ibt 87, or other equivalent recognised English language qualification. For additional information including entry requirements from your country, fees and scholarships go to the International section of the website.

Teaching & Research

Research in the Faculty of Education is organised around two centres and research fora / groups:

Students taking a Masters in the Education Faculty may find their work aligns with any or several of these groups, as the award is designed to allow individuals to study areas of education and teaching and learning in a wide variety of settings and contexts.

Employability

You will be able to structure your award to enhance your personal interests, career specific opportunities and potential for promotion to senior management and leadership. It will enable you to evaluate adult's and children's learning through research and postgraduate study. For teachers, this course will enhance opportunities to move beyond the threshold and become an 'excellent teacher'.

Students completing the MA will also be well placed to go on to a doctorate (EdD or PhD) at Liverpool Hope.

Overview

* This course qualifies for the New £10,000 Postgraduate Loan Scheme (PGL)

The MA Special Educational Needs has been designed to meet and extend the interests and requirements of professionals in all kinds of educational contexts, from early years to post-compulsory settings. The provision of this MA recognises a growing interest in this aspect of educational provision and the Faculty’s commitment to work for educational equality and social justice.

The degree is distinctive in drawing on Disability Studies perspectives in order to interrogate the nature and origins of the Special Educational Needs discourse. This will enable you to take a critical stance on historical and current practise enabling you to challenge implicit and damaging assumptions about the nature of Special Educational Needs and the implications for learners.

The degree is informed by the application of a Critical Disability Studies theoretical framework enabling Liverpool Hope University to offer a distinctive and critical approach to the ways in which we conceptualise and practise ‘special’ education. As part of your study you will develop your own creative and critical response to the design of an appropriate research project. A significant consideration will be the necessity of engaging with the ethics of disability research.

For further information download the Special Educational Needs MA leaflet

Curriculum

In accordance with the University’s Regulations/Guidelines on Master’s qualifications, the MA Special Educational Needs consists of a 180 credits taught postgraduate programme. The programme offers exit awards at the Postgraduate Certificate stage (60 credits) and the Postgraduate Diploma stage (120 credits). The research phase leads to completion of a dissertation through independent study with individual research supervision. To achieve the full award (180 credits) students must take a range of taught modules up to the value of 120 credits and complete the research phase, which follows a 15+45 credit model.

The modules covered include Critical Disability Theory; Disability and Professional Practice; Segregation, Integration and Inclusion; Normalising Difference in Educational Practice; Researching Disability; and a Dissertation. 

Critical Disability Theory (30 credits)

Focusing on critical theory from the modern and postmodern eras, this module provides a basis for an interrogation of Disability Studies and Special Educational Needs. From Freud to Foucault, Goffman to Garland-Thomson, Derrida to Davis, McRuer to Murray, and so on, the module follows the progression of critical disability theory from the early twentieth century to the present day. Though explicitly theoretical, the content of the module is grounded in experiential knowledge. Concepts such as stigma, the normate, panopticism, normalcy, narrative prosthesis, dismodernism, crip theory, aesthetic nervousness, autistic presence, and the metanarrative of blindness are explored in relation to social, cultural, and individual attitudes toward impairment, disability and education. 

Disability and Professional Practice (30 credits)

The relationship between disability and professional practice can be both problematic and productive. This relationship is explored in the module as an array of perspectives and expertise is considered. Training, teaching, therapy, legislation, and so on, are all manifestly praiseworthy but nonetheless warrant critical engagement. How and by whom is disability voiced within the professions? These are some of the many proactive questions that the module explores in relation to the professional context.

Segregation, Integration and Inclusion (30 credits)

As Baglieri and Knopf (2004) suggest human differences are ordinary, yet education continues to mark out some human differential characteristics as 'abnormal' and in need of 'special' education. Therefore, this module intends to map out how learner's differences have been conceptualised across time and examine the range of influences that have been significant to the changing landscape of what we now call SEN.

Normalising Difference in Educational Practice (30 Credits)
Baglieri and Knopf (2004:526) suggest that ‘active and continual effort toward the acceptance and improvement of inclusive educational practices is a possible first move towards social justice’. As such, this module aims to highlight the disabling nature of many educational structures and pedagogical practices and offer you insights into how curricula can be designed to reduce inequality and embrace human variation.

Researching Disability (15 Credits)
Disability has been conceptualised in many ways and for many purposes. In the past it tended to be non-disabled people who were responsible for the conceptualising and theorising of disability. In recent years, however, thanks largely to disability activism, disabled people have taken control of the ways in which disability is modelled. In order to gain a better idea of what is meant by disability, the module takes a critical journey through religious, charity, medical, social, affirmative, cultural, and other models of disability.

Entry Requirements

Normally a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours Degree in a relevant discipline.
Applications from students who do not hold a 1st or 2:1 Honours Degree (or equivalent) will be asked to demonstrate potential to achieve a Masters award via a sample of academic writing and interview before an offer is made.

Please note that a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (formally the Criminal Records Bureau – CRB) is required for students where they are required to visit settings other than their own.

For students whose first language is not English there is a language requirement of IELTS 6.5 overall (reading 6, writing 6), TOEFL ibt 87, or other equivalent recognised English language qualification. For additional information including entry requirements from your country, fees and scholarships go to the International section of the website.

Teaching & Research

Research in the Faculty of Education is organised around two centres and research fora / groups:

Students taking a Masters in the Education Faculty may find their work aligns with any or several of these groups, as the award is designed to allow individuals to study areas of education and teaching and learning in a wide variety of settings and contexts.

Employability

You will be able to structure your award to enhance your personal interests, career specific opportunities and potential for promotion to senior management and leadership. It will enable you to evaluate adult's and children's learning through research and postgraduate study. For teachers, this course will enhance opportunities to move beyond the threshold and become an 'excellent teacher'.

Students completing the MA will also be well placed to go on to a doctorate (EdD or PhD) at Liverpool Hope.

Course Contact Details

Student Recruitment Team

t: +44 (0) 151 291 3111

e: enquiry@hope.ac.uk

Faculty: Education

t: +44 (0) 151 291 3410

e: educationpgt@hope.ac.uk

Start Date: September only

H‌ow To Apply