Welcome

SIG Writing International Conference and Research School 2016

1st – 6th July 2016

Welcome to the 15th SIG Writing Conference which is to be held in Liverpool, UK from 4th to the 6th July, 2016. We are pleased to be inviting writing researchers from across the world to share their ideas in a city with a strong cultural history in writing. The conference will be preceded by a two-day research school (registration 1st July 2016) in Liverpool Hope University’s new Science facilities.

For many years the university has a strong tradition in the field of teacher education. This is complemented by the expertise in research into writing processes that is undertaken in Psychology in the Faculty of Science.

Liverpool is an inspiring place to be for writers. We look forward to lively interdisciplinary debates with humour, on occasion!

 

Contact Us

Conference Organisers:

 

Lorna Bourke ‌      

Dr Lorna Bourke ‌‌

 

 Simon Davies

Dr Simon Davies

 

 

Conference Manager:

Shannon Steele 

Conference Coordinator:

Lyndsey Moss

 

For more information please email: SIGwriting2016@hope.ac.uk

Postal Address:

SIGwriting2016

Department of Psychology

Liverpool Hope University

Hope Park

L16 9JD, UK

 

Twitter: @SIGwriting2016

Facebook: SIG Writing Conference and Research School 2016

Website: www.hope.ac.uk/sigwriting2016

 

Earli logo               SIG logo

Registration

Registering for the Conference and Research School: Making a payment

By now the conference management system has been updated with the decisions regarding the acceptance of submissions to the conference and research school. All presenting authors and symposium organisers should have been advised of the outcomes of the review process.

PLEASE NOTE: before making a payment with the online store (details below) you will need to register for the Research School and/or the SIG Writing Conference on the conference management system. This forms part of the contract for the conference. It just means logging into the conference management system if you are already on the system and have a password (or creating a login, if not), then click on Registration/Payment for either or both the Writing Research School 2016 and SIG Writing Conference 2016 depending on which you wish to attend. After doing this then please register with the online store and make your payment.

Closing date for Stage 2: 15th May 2016

Thank you to all of you who have registered with the Online store for the conference and research school and have made payments for the conference/research school and/or accommodation. If you are having difficulties with this then please contact our Conference Manager: Shannon Steele steeles@hope.ac.uk.

Registration Fees

  Early Bird Registration    Late Registration  
   PhD Student Regular  PhD Student  Regular 
SIG Writing Conference 2016         

EARLI SIG

Writing Member*

 
 £220 £250 £240  £270 
Non-Member £240 £270 £260 £290 
Research School 2016        

EARLI SIG

Writing Member*

 
 £160 £190 £180  £210 
Non-Member  £180  £210  £200  £230 

 

*For information about SIG Writing membership, please go to the SIG Writing website, and click on ‘about us’.

Payments

Transactions for SIGwriting2016 are rendered secure via Liverpool Hope University Online Shop. It is an easy to use pathway for purchasing goods and services from the University. All major debit and credit cards (Visa, Visa Debit, MasterCard, Visa Electron) are accepted with the exception of American Express.

Information regarding the general terms and conditions and the cancellation policy for bookings is located at the bottom of the page. Once all the key contributors have registered and paid for the conference, the conference programme can be scheduled and released.

SIGwriting2016 Schedule

First call

May 10, 2015

Second call/open submission

September 1, 2015

Start registrations

September 10, 2015

Deadline for proposals

December 15, 2015

Proposals reviewed/confirmed

March 1, 2016

Deadline for early bird registration

April 1, 2016

Deadline registrations

May 15, 2016

Deadline cancellation*

May 31, 2016

Conference programme available

June 15, 2016

Research School

July 2-3, 2016

SIGwriting2016 Conference

July 4-6, 2016

 

Please note that the early bird deadline expires April 1, 2016. Submissions not registered before May 15, 2016 will not appear in the programme. At least one author per contribution must be registered, as well as one discussant and one organiser per symposium.

Please note that cancellations before May 31, 2016 will be entitled to a refund of 50% of the registration fee. No reimbursements can be offered after May 31, 2016

  • Cancellation policy: see the general terms

 

 

Liver Birds

Bursaries

Dr Joshi Travel Grants

The following people were awarded Joshi Travel Grants
Rosianne Arseneau, Canada
Sara Ferreira, Portugal
Fien De Smedt, Belgium
Marisela Bonilla Lopez, Belgium
Maria Prata, Portugal
Ines Moura, Portugal

General Terms and Conditions

General Regulations

Please note that payments should be made without extra costs for the beneficiary.

There is no daily conference registration rate.

When you register, you declare that you accept that we charge your bank account for the events you have selected.

The conference runs from Monday 0900 until Wednesday 1730 hrs. All accepted proposals will be scheduled on these three days, and it is assumed that speakers will be available for all three days. It will be impossible to deal with individual preferences.

Cancellation Policy

Cancellations before June 1, 2016 will be entitled to a refund of 50% of the registration fee. No reimbursements will be offered after June 1, 2016. Cancellation will only be possible by sending an email to: SIGwriting2016@hope.ac.uk.

Membership

SIG Writing Members are entitled to receive a reasonable discount for the two advertised events. You will be asked to include your membership number when you register for the events.

Programme

The Conference is scheduled from Monday 9am - Wednesday 5.30pm.

Please find a PDF of the Conference & Research School Schedule

Conference Schedule 30/06/2016 & Research School Updated 24/06/2016

Types of sessions and how they work

Conference Handbook 30/06/2016

Please find the link to the schedule for the individual sessions within the research meetings. Research Meeting Schedule

Abstract Books

Conference abstract book:


Keynote Speakers

Lucile Chanquoy, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, John R. Hayes Award for Excellence in Writing Research

 

Writing and Children

We are pleased to announce that Professor Lucile Chanquoy will be the Keynote Speaker for the conference. Lucile’s research on children and adults transcends important aspects of the study of writing that includes underlying cognitive mechanisms, the complexity of quality of writing, different genres of texts, the application of findings to instruction and impact of motivation and emotion on writing processes and products. Therefore, she very much embeds the key theme of the conference within her research programme.

About Lucile Chanquoy

Lucile Chanquoy has been Professor of Cognitive Psychology, with a speciality in child development at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis (member of the Université Côte d’Azur, a very new organization of Faculties, Research Centres, private schools for students) since September 2004 when she was recruited as a mutation candidate. Before this, Lucile spent four years as a Professor at the University of Nantes and seven years as Associate Professor at the University of Montpellier. Just before going to Montpellier, she has been junior assistant at the University of Geneva for one year. Lucile really was a “moving researcher and teacher”!

She was supervised for her PhD in psychology by Michel Fayol, a very renowned Professor based in France, at the University of Burgundy, in Dijon, where she studied. Her PhD was about punctuation and connectives in different types of texts produced by children from 1st to 5th grades.

Lucile obtained her “Habilitation à Diriger les Recherches” (a specific diploma to be able to apply for a Professor position) when she was in Montpellier, but she defended her HDR in Aix-en-Provence, under the supervision of Annie Piolat, another famous writing researcher. Her work for the HDR was about the links between writing and the cognitive system.

Throughout her career, Lucile has always been very active in the administrative and research management of her different universities. At the University of Nice, she was the Head of her laboratory during the 4 years she was there, before switching to another bigger laboratory (affiliated to the French CNRS) in which she is now the Co-Director (Deputy). During those four years she was also Vice-Dean and responsible for the research program for her faculty (social and human sciences, literature, arts). She is currently Director of the Doctoral School (for all PhD students) of her Faculty and she is a member of the Academic Council of the Université Côte d’Azur.

Lucile has always been very active in research programs, both in her university (with local and national conventions) and in other circumstances: she was closely aligned to the research team associated with the CNRS about Written Production (managed by Denis Alamargot for 8 years), and is an expert for the European Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS).

She has published many papers mainly about writing, in collaboration with colleagues and her PhD students. Her main research interests concern the development of writing processes, linked to the cognitive system (Long Term Memory and Working Memory) and its constraints (especially the limited resources in WM) as well as the impact of emotion and motivation.

More “privately”, Lucile is the proud and obsessed mother of two marvellous girls, born January 2002 and December 2003.

John R. Hayes Award for Excellence in Writing Research

The John R. Hayes Award winner from the SIG Writing Conference in Amsterdam, 2014 was Kimberly Epting (Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Elon University, North Carolina, US) with her paper Read and think before you write: Prewriting time and level of print exposure as factors in writing. Journal of Writing Research 4(3), 239-257.  We congratulate, Kimberly on her success. She will be presenting her latest research in the plenary session on Wednesday, 6th July 2016.  I am sure you will agree that she is a worthy winner of this prestigious award. The abstract for the paper is below:

So Many Variables, Few Overlapping Effects: Investigating Situational Factors that Influence Writing Process Measures

Effective written communication requires that writers monitor and respond to their own writing during composition, employing revision to shape their expressions toward maximal effectiveness. As such, revision is an inherent part of the iterative process of writing, and subject to influence by any variables that may affect the writing process in general. Interestingly, a given variable may affect only certain aspects of the writing (including revision) process. One stream of research in my lab over the past several years has been identifying some of the situational variables that influence the writing and revision process and identifying the specific aspects affected. A custom keystroke-logging program records a variety of process measures, including insertions, deletions, substitutions, total keystrokes as well as total released characters, and prompt reviews. Pauses are also measured, defined individually in relation to transcription speeds. In 3 particular studies, we have investigated how those measures were influenced by prewriting time and print exposure (study 1), prompt valence and agent of experience (study 2), and feedback and perceived audience (study 3). The results across these studies underscore the complexity of the writing and revision process in that each factor apparently influences different and particular aspects of the process. For example, according to our results, prewriting time and type of feedback both influence prompt reviewing; yet prewriting time, but not feedback type, also affects average pause lengths whereas feedback type, but not prewriting time, also affects an overall editing measure. On the other hand, variables such as print exposure and prompt valence were not associated with significant differences in most process variables, but were associated with differences in length and quality (print exposure) or with differential content (e.g., positive, negative, cognitive words). The independent variables of interest in the studies vary greatly, but the studies are grounded in similar methodology and intentional overlap in dependent measures. As a result, we believe we have a robust and flexible research approach that allows comparison across studies to begin shaping a picture of the sensitivity of process measures and the types of factors most likely to affect each.

Conference Formats

Symposia provide an opportunity to present a topic of interest from multiple perspectives. The symposium should be proposed by 1-2 organisers. Three papers should be selected based on their thematic coherence and a discussant and chairperson should be elected. We would prefer it if the thematic contributions combined research from different universities. The organisers for each proposed symposia should submit summaries (max. 250 words) of the selected papers as well as an abstract (350 words) in which the papers are integrated into a coherent framework.

Each symposium will be scheduled for 1.5 hours: 20 minutes per speaker (15 minutes presentation, 5 minutes question time), 15 minutes for the discussion by the discussant, and 15 minutes for open discussion, convened by the chairperson.

Paper presentations describe a completed piece of research, and should include data and results.  We also encourage theoretical papers. The submission should describe the research that has been conducted in no more than 250 words. The paper sessions will be grouped into 4 papers: each paper is presented for 15 minutes, leaving 10 minutes for discussion. The sessions will be convened by a chairperson.

Short presentations involve a 5 minute presentation of a completed piece of research or it can be research that is in progress.  This will be followed by individual poster interaction and discussion. The poster (A0 format: 841 mm x 1189 mm) provides a visual depiction of the research that has been conducted. This will include a description of the design and (preliminary) results in no more than 250 words.

The short presentations will be grouped thematically into sessions of 6 presentations: after a 5 minute oral presentation of each poster (projected on a screen), there will be 30 minutes of individual poster interaction, followed by 30 minutes of plenary discussion, convened by a chairperson.

Research meetings offer opportunities for discussing prevalent research issues. Presenters explain their issue, and participants are invited to discuss this issue. Presenters should submit a summary (max. 250 words) of the research in which the issue that is to be discussed is clearly stated. These expert meetings are scheduled for 1.5 hours: presenters are allocated 45 minutes each to explain and discuss their research issue.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to information on the conference management system stating that summaries of proposed research should be max. 350 words (now amended to 250 words) no one will be penalised for submitting summaries at the longer length.

Conference Short Presentations

Please leave the poster with the Registration Team. The posters will be available for participants to read throughout the conference. An electronic version of the poster should be available for the scheduled sessions on Tuesday and will be projected onto a screen in the designated rooms. This will allow for an explanation of the key points from the research project and discussion.

Social Programme

Participants registered for the main conference are also invited to a drinks reception on the Monday, July 4, 2016.  A cultural tour of Liverpool will also be included. Travel companions are also welcome.

Beatles

The social dinner can be booked as an option payable at the same time as registration. It will be held in a beautiful venue called the Great Hall near the centre of the city. We hope as many people come along to it as possible. Transport from the conference venue to conference dinner (and return) will be arranged. There will be live music and stories. Download the Gala Dinner menu.

It is anticipated that a cultural programme will be organised that will focus on the work of British writers.

We are pleased to announce that Natalie Rice from Merchant Taylors School, Crosby will be delivering a session each day focusing on different forms of writing, through which we hope you will enjoy an interactive hands on experience at creating. Each session is designed as a stand-alone session that follows a common theme.

Day 1: Monday, 4th July 2016 Creative writing (Postcard/Travel writing) (10:30-12:00)

This will start with Bill Bryson’s ‘today I arrived in Liverpool and they were having a litter festival’ as inspiration.

Day 2: Tuesday, 5th July 2016 Song lyrics (11:00-12:30)

This will involve an examination of Beatles song lyrics etc. with a view to thinking about the effect of rhyme. In particular, there will be a focus on the question: Is it important?

Day 3: Wednesday, 6th July 2016 Snapshot of Liverpool (11:00-12:30)

This will be an opportunity to write slogans about Liverpool based on a slideshow of images.

All in all the sessions are designed to inspire and be fun. If you learn a little about Liverpool culture along the way, then that’s good too. We do hope that you will be able to come along to them.

Beatles Tour

Well not quite a magical mystery tour because we’re going to give you some hint of where you will be going: Penny Lane, Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool’s waterfront and Albert Dock, Mathew Street and the Cavern Club. The coaches depart at 17:45 on Monday, 4th July 2016. It will bring you back to the Conference Venue for the Drinks Reception we are holding at 19:00.

 

Scientific Committee

Name

Affiliation

Anne-Marie Adams

Liverpool John Moores University

Rui A. Alves

University of Porto

Barbara Arfé

University of Padova

Montserrat Castelló Badia

Ramon Llull University

Charles Bazerman

University of California

Pietro Boscolo

University of Padova

Vince Connelly

Oxford Brookes University

Julie Dockrell

University of London

Christiane K. Donahue

Dartmouth College

Michel Fayol

Blaise Pascal University, CNRS

David Galbraith

University of Southampton

Steve Graham

Arizona State University

Karen R. Harris

Arizona State University

John R. Hayes

Carnegie Mellon University

Victoria Johansson

Lund University

Marielle Leijten

University of Antwerp

Charles MacArthur

University of Delaware

Margarida Alves Martins

Higher Institute for Applied Psychology, Lisbon

Deborah McCutchen

University of Washington

Debra Myhill

University of Exeter

Thierry Olive

University of Poitiers, CNRS

Gert Rijlaarsdam

University of Amsterdam

Mark Torrance

Nottingham Trent University

Luuk Van Waes

University of Antwerp

Åsa Wengelin

University of Gothenburg

Travel and Hotels

Getting to Hope

From Liverpool John Lennon Airport to Hope Park

The closest airport to Hope Park is Liverpool John Lennon airport.    

To travel to the university it takes approximately 20 minutes by bus from the airport (traffic depending). If you are travelling to Hope from Liverpool John Lennon airport, the most direct public transport route is by bus. Alternatively, if you wish to go straight into the city centre there are frequent train and bus routes.

By Bus

The 187 operates between Hope Park and Liverpool South Parkway (the airport) every half hour during the day time Monday - Saturday. Follow this link for other buses and travel information.

By Train

You can get a train from Liverpool South Parkway train station to Lime Street train station in the city centre. The airport is a short bus journey from South Parkway station. 

By Taxi or Minibus

Private hire taxis:

Private hire minibuses:

From Manchester Airport to Hope Park

Manchester airport is the second closest Airport to Liverpool. It takes approximately one hour by National Express coach to get from Manchester airport bus terminal to Liverpool city centre. By Northern Rail train (see here for the train map) the journey also takes approximately one hour to get to South Parkway Station [a short taxi ride away from the university].

From Liverpool City Centre to Hope Park Campus

To get to Hope Park from Liverpool city centre you can get either the Arriva 75 bus or the Merseytravel 86c (alight at Woolton road), this journey takes approximately 30 - 40 minutes traffic depending.

From Heathrow to Liverpool

If you fly to Heathrow rather than Liverpool or Manchester, you can get either a train or a coach to Liverpool. It is best to book in advance to guarantee a seat and a reasonable price. National Express coaches depart from the airport while the train departs from Euston station. You can commute to Euston from the airport on the underground by taking the Piccadilly Line to Green Park, then the Victoria Line to Euston. 

For more information about Liverpool see the Visit Liverpool website.

More information on How to get to Hope.

 

Accommodation

University accommodation

The keys for the accommodation will be given out during registration. Early arrivals should report to the Security Lodge on Taggart Avenue, L16 9JD. The security lodge is directly near to the accommodation and conference venue.

Option 1

There is a variety of accommodation options situated within the grounds of the conference venue. All of which are competitively priced. They are listed as follows:

Type of Accommodation

 

Price per room/per night

En Suite & Breakfast

Hall of Residence

£55

En Suite & Breakfast

EDEN Suite (University Hotel)

£95

Room only

Taggart Lodge

£85

Room only

Green Lane Annexe Apartment

£115

Please take a look at the image gallery to view the accommodation available. In the Halls of Residence there are also catering facilities and linen and toiletries will be provided as part of the cost. In addition to the Halls of Residence we have a University hotel, the EDEN Suite. This has 17 executive style double en-suite bedrooms.  The university also has several Lodges that are available and would perhaps suit larger parties or groups who would like to share facilities. Breakfast is conveniently located for all the accommodation types.

The on campus accommodation available in Option 1 should suit most people’s needs and is conveniently placed to enjoy the vibrant research community during the conference. However, if you would like to be based in the City Centre then there is Option 2.

Option 2

Liverpool has a wide range of hotels which can be booked from hotel websites and price comparison sites.  The city centre is approximately a 25-35 minute bus ride from the University.

Mersey Ferry

 

Research School

Liverpool Hope University 2-3 July, 2016 (Registration 1st July 2016).

Following the success of the two-day Research School held at Utrecht University in 2014, the SIGwriting2016 conference will be preceded by this again. Although it is primarily designed for PhD candidates and other junior researchers, all are welcome if you feel it might be useful. 

The theme of the Research School is People, products and processes: the triple narrative that awakens writing.

The main objective is to provide an opportunity for researchers to engage in an initiative focusing on the integration of a number of different research and statistical methods identified as important to the field of writing research. There is increasing evidence that the field of writing research is advancing through the inclusion of mixed methods research. Previously diametrically opposed research methods e.g. eyetracker and qualitative interviews are being explored within the same research programme. Thus, arguably, providing a more comprehensive insight into the characteristics of the writer, the processes they engage in and the products they produce.

Therefore, the intention is to take researchers from an understanding of what the learner contributes to the process of writing, to how this might be analysed at more fine-grained grammatical levels and with different populations of writers (e.g. dyslexia and dyspraxia), to the technology we have available to us to determine the underlying processes that explain differences in the written product and finish with a representation of some of the important contributions making a difference to education through interventions as well as a discussion on identity and regulation in writing through qualitative research methods. Thus, the workshops provided by experts will stimulate and cement research at the early stages of a research career and allow researchers to gain a broader understanding of how multiple perspectives interact in research as well as the techniques used to explore them.

Research School Programme

There are a couple of changes to the original programme we advertised. We arranged for registration to start earlier than planned (you can register at any point on the Friday) and have developed a couple of sessions that are designed to get to know you all better, if you do happen to arrive earlier. We have also added a registration point on Saturday, 2nd July 2016.
There is also no need to select which workshops you would like to attend as the time slots have been constructed so that people have the opportunity to learn from all the sessions. The aim of the weekend is to gain a greater understanding of your own research perspective and that of others so that there might be some realisation of the synergies between them. It is common now for research papers to include multiple methods.  Hopefully, this will provide excellent discussion points.
We will meet in Our Place (Student Union) at 7 pm before heading into Liverpool City Centre about 7.30 pm for those of you who would like to do this.
Please see Research School Schedule Research School Updated 24/06/2016

 

The programme is encapsulated within the following themes:

Theme

International Experts

Theme A: Learning to write and learner characteristics

A1: Examining the characteristics of the learner in school

A2: Structural Equation Modelling and learner characteristics

 

Anne-Marie Adams, UK

Teresa Limpo, Portugal

Theme B: Capturing and analysing writing process data

B1: Capturing and analysing handwriting data using Openhandwrite

B2: Analysing process data

 

Mark Torrance, UK

Guido Nottbusch, Germany

 

Theme C: Assessing and deciphering text quality

C1: Analysing children’s written text products capturing development

C2: Curriculum based measures of assessment of written text products

 

 

Vince Connelly, UK

Julie Dockrell, UK

 

Theme D: Interventions, identity and qualitative methods

D1: Interventions and writing education

D2: Identity, regulation and qualitative methods

 

 

Eva Lindgren, Sweden

Montserrat Castello, Spain

 

Additional contributions to the programme

SPSS and Data Analysis

Chair, Expert Panel

 

Simon Davies, UK

David Galbraith, UK

For more information about conference fees for the Research School visit the registration tab. There is a Research School evening social event included in the price.

 

Research School Short Presentations

Please place leave posters with the Registration Team and we will arrange for them to be displayed. The boards are situated in the first floor atrium area. An electronic copy of the poster should be available for the scheduled sessions on Saturday and will be projected onto a screen in the designated rooms. This will allow for an explanation of the key points from the research project and discussion.

European Literacy Network

The research school is supported by a grant from the European Literacy Network (ELN) Cost Action IS1041. This has enabled the following nine trainees to be awarded bursaries up to 600 Euros. The trainees were selected in accordance with the rules of ELN, which include ensuring that there is balance across countries in the bursaries awarded; and that participants from the research school location (UK) were not eligible. All registered participants were automatically considered for the bursary. 
Luisa Pereira, Portugal
Vibeke Rønneberg, Norway
Christine Sontag, Germany
Natalia Bilici, Luxembourg
Hampus Holm, Sweden
Rannveig Oddsdóttir, Iceland
Peter Hobel, Denmark
María Arrimada, Spain
Baran Johannson, Sweden

Exciting new SIG Writing Initiative

The SIG Writing Best Early Stage Short Talk Award (or simply the SIG Writing BESST Award) was announced at the SIG Writing business meeting at the EARLI conference in Limassol recently. The winner will receive a monetary prize of 400€ and the will be announced during the main conference. Click on the following link to find out more details about this great opportunity for recognition of the work new scientists to the area of writing research are doing: SIG Writing BESST Award.

 

Call for Papers for Research School

For each day of the Research School, participants select one out of two themes related to their own research and/or interest. Participants have the unique opportunity to discuss their projects with other writing researchers and to get valuable feedback from experts in the field in expert round table sessions.

To facilitate discussion, each participant is asked to prepare a short presentation of his/her research and a poster. These presentations will be thematically grouped.

Research School activities are specifically intended for master and PhD students, as well as graduates who received their doctorate within the last two years. To participate in the Research School junior researchers must submit a proposal for a short (poster) presentation.

Short presentations involve a 5 minute presentation of a completed piece of research or research in progress, followed by individual poster interaction and discussion. The poster (A0 format: 841 mm X 1189mm) provides a visual representation of the conducted research. Submissions for short presentations should describe the research, including (preliminary) results, in max. 350 words. It is possible to submit the same proposal for both SIGwriting2016 and the Research School.

 

Research School and SIGwriting2016 Schedule

First call

May 10, 2015

Second call/open submission

September 1, 2015

Start registrations

September 10, 2015

Deadline for proposals

December 15, 2015

Proposals reviewed/confirmed

March 1, 2016

Deadline for early bird registration

April 1, 2016

Deadline registrations

May 15, 2016

Deadline cancellation*

May 31, 2016

Conference programme available

June 15, 2016

Research School

July 2-3, 2016

SIGwriting2016 Conference

July 4-6, 2016

Programme Schedule (to be confirmed)

Registration workshops

On each Research School day two themes will be highlighted, through lectures during the morning, followed by workshops in the afternoon. More information about the themes will be provided in due course.

There will be a registration process for the workshops in which you will state both your first and second choice. Workshops will then be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Once advertised, we ask you to register as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

Poster guidelines

Poster sessions offer researchers the chance to present their work in a visual format and offer opportunities for interaction.

Research School poster presentation

Posters are grouped thematically. Each presenter introduces his/her poster in a one-minute pitch. After the introductions, the presenters stand next to their posters to talk with interested attendees. We recommend you prepare a brief presentation (max. 5 minutes) to explain your research in further detail.

For more information on SIGwriting2016 short presentations, click here.

The poster should be A0 size (841 mm X 1189mm), oriented vertically or horizontally. Materials for fixing posters to the walls will be provided. It is recommended that the presenter has a number of copies of the poster in the form of handouts in A4 format to distribute to interested participants. Search YouTube videos for tips on ‘how to create a poster with powerpoint’.

A poster should inform the audience about:

1. Title and authors
2. Research problem or objective of the project
3. Research questions and/or hypotheses
4. Method: a description of the sample, design, materials and procedure of the study
5. Analyses of the study
6. Most important/expected results
7. Conclusions, theoretical and/or practical implications

A poster should be as self-explanatory as possible. To reach this aim, make it clear, structured, concise, and attractive.

Clarity and structure: The title and authors’ names and affiliations should be at the top of the poster. It is often useful to have sections indicating, for example, the aims of the research, the methods and subjects involved, and the materials used. Other sections might highlight the most important results and the conclusions. Diagrams, graphs and tables can be used effectively to visualise results.

Conciseness: As space is very limited, try to present the most important information only and effectively. Don’t overcrowd the poster with too much data or too much text. The title and the conclusion are the most important “eye catchers”. Make sure that the message you want to convey is transported by the information and not lost in it.

Attractiveness: Be aware that your poster is being viewed from a distance. Therefore, all text should be large enough to be read from a distance of about 1.5 metres. You can use background colours and arrangements of columns or rows to connect portions visually that are related conceptually. Such layouts help guide the audience through the poster.

Welcome

SIG Writing International Conference and Research School 2016

1st – 6th July 2016

Welcome to the 15th SIG Writing Conference which is to be held in Liverpool, UK from 4th to the 6th July, 2016. We are pleased to be inviting writing researchers from across the world to share their ideas in a city with a strong cultural history in writing. The conference will be preceded by a two-day research school (registration 1st July 2016) in Liverpool Hope University’s new Science facilities.

For many years the university has a strong tradition in the field of teacher education. This is complemented by the expertise in research into writing processes that is undertaken in Psychology in the Faculty of Science.

Liverpool is an inspiring place to be for writers. We look forward to lively interdisciplinary debates with humour, on occasion!

 

Contact Us

Conference Organisers:

 

Lorna Bourke ‌      

Dr Lorna Bourke ‌‌

 

 Simon Davies

Dr Simon Davies

 

 

Conference Manager:

Shannon Steele 

Conference Coordinator:

Lyndsey Moss

 

For more information please email: SIGwriting2016@hope.ac.uk

Postal Address:

SIGwriting2016

Department of Psychology

Liverpool Hope University

Hope Park

L16 9JD, UK

 

Twitter: @SIGwriting2016

Facebook: SIG Writing Conference and Research School 2016

Website: www.hope.ac.uk/sigwriting2016

 

Earli logo               SIG logo

Registration

Registering for the Conference and Research School: Making a payment

By now the conference management system has been updated with the decisions regarding the acceptance of submissions to the conference and research school. All presenting authors and symposium organisers should have been advised of the outcomes of the review process.

PLEASE NOTE: before making a payment with the online store (details below) you will need to register for the Research School and/or the SIG Writing Conference on the conference management system. This forms part of the contract for the conference. It just means logging into the conference management system if you are already on the system and have a password (or creating a login, if not), then click on Registration/Payment for either or both the Writing Research School 2016 and SIG Writing Conference 2016 depending on which you wish to attend. After doing this then please register with the online store and make your payment.

Closing date for Stage 2: 15th May 2016

Thank you to all of you who have registered with the Online store for the conference and research school and have made payments for the conference/research school and/or accommodation. If you are having difficulties with this then please contact our Conference Manager: Shannon Steele steeles@hope.ac.uk.

Registration Fees

  Early Bird Registration    Late Registration  
   PhD Student Regular  PhD Student  Regular 
SIG Writing Conference 2016         

EARLI SIG

Writing Member*

 
 £220 £250 £240  £270 
Non-Member £240 £270 £260 £290 
Research School 2016        

EARLI SIG

Writing Member*

 
 £160 £190 £180  £210 
Non-Member  £180  £210  £200  £230 

 

*For information about SIG Writing membership, please go to the SIG Writing website, and click on ‘about us’.

Payments

Transactions for SIGwriting2016 are rendered secure via Liverpool Hope University Online Shop. It is an easy to use pathway for purchasing goods and services from the University. All major debit and credit cards (Visa, Visa Debit, MasterCard, Visa Electron) are accepted with the exception of American Express.

Information regarding the general terms and conditions and the cancellation policy for bookings is located at the bottom of the page. Once all the key contributors have registered and paid for the conference, the conference programme can be scheduled and released.

SIGwriting2016 Schedule

First call

May 10, 2015

Second call/open submission

September 1, 2015

Start registrations

September 10, 2015

Deadline for proposals

December 15, 2015

Proposals reviewed/confirmed

March 1, 2016

Deadline for early bird registration

April 1, 2016

Deadline registrations

May 15, 2016

Deadline cancellation*

May 31, 2016

Conference programme available

June 15, 2016

Research School

July 2-3, 2016

SIGwriting2016 Conference

July 4-6, 2016

 

Please note that the early bird deadline expires April 1, 2016. Submissions not registered before May 15, 2016 will not appear in the programme. At least one author per contribution must be registered, as well as one discussant and one organiser per symposium.

Please note that cancellations before May 31, 2016 will be entitled to a refund of 50% of the registration fee. No reimbursements can be offered after May 31, 2016

  • Cancellation policy: see the general terms

 

 

Liver Birds

Bursaries

Dr Joshi Travel Grants

The following people were awarded Joshi Travel Grants
Rosianne Arseneau, Canada
Sara Ferreira, Portugal
Fien De Smedt, Belgium
Marisela Bonilla Lopez, Belgium
Maria Prata, Portugal
Ines Moura, Portugal

General Terms and Conditions

General Regulations

Please note that payments should be made without extra costs for the beneficiary.

There is no daily conference registration rate.

When you register, you declare that you accept that we charge your bank account for the events you have selected.

The conference runs from Monday 0900 until Wednesday 1730 hrs. All accepted proposals will be scheduled on these three days, and it is assumed that speakers will be available for all three days. It will be impossible to deal with individual preferences.

Cancellation Policy

Cancellations before June 1, 2016 will be entitled to a refund of 50% of the registration fee. No reimbursements will be offered after June 1, 2016. Cancellation will only be possible by sending an email to: SIGwriting2016@hope.ac.uk.

Membership

SIG Writing Members are entitled to receive a reasonable discount for the two advertised events. You will be asked to include your membership number when you register for the events.

Programme

The Conference is scheduled from Monday 9am - Wednesday 5.30pm.

Please find a PDF of the Conference & Research School Schedule

Conference Schedule 30/06/2016 & Research School Updated 24/06/2016

Types of sessions and how they work

Conference Handbook 30/06/2016

Please find the link to the schedule for the individual sessions within the research meetings. Research Meeting Schedule

Abstract Books

Conference abstract book:

Keynote Speakers

Lucile Chanquoy, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, John R. Hayes Award for Excellence in Writing Research

 

Writing and Children

We are pleased to announce that Professor Lucile Chanquoy will be the Keynote Speaker for the conference. Lucile’s research on children and adults transcends important aspects of the study of writing that includes underlying cognitive mechanisms, the complexity of quality of writing, different genres of texts, the application of findings to instruction and impact of motivation and emotion on writing processes and products. Therefore, she very much embeds the key theme of the conference within her research programme.

About Lucile Chanquoy

Lucile Chanquoy has been Professor of Cognitive Psychology, with a speciality in child development at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis (member of the Université Côte d’Azur, a very new organization of Faculties, Research Centres, private schools for students) since September 2004 when she was recruited as a mutation candidate. Before this, Lucile spent four years as a Professor at the University of Nantes and seven years as Associate Professor at the University of Montpellier. Just before going to Montpellier, she has been junior assistant at the University of Geneva for one year. Lucile really was a “moving researcher and teacher”!

She was supervised for her PhD in psychology by Michel Fayol, a very renowned Professor based in France, at the University of Burgundy, in Dijon, where she studied. Her PhD was about punctuation and connectives in different types of texts produced by children from 1st to 5th grades.

Lucile obtained her “Habilitation à Diriger les Recherches” (a specific diploma to be able to apply for a Professor position) when she was in Montpellier, but she defended her HDR in Aix-en-Provence, under the supervision of Annie Piolat, another famous writing researcher. Her work for the HDR was about the links between writing and the cognitive system.

Throughout her career, Lucile has always been very active in the administrative and research management of her different universities. At the University of Nice, she was the Head of her laboratory during the 4 years she was there, before switching to another bigger laboratory (affiliated to the French CNRS) in which she is now the Co-Director (Deputy). During those four years she was also Vice-Dean and responsible for the research program for her faculty (social and human sciences, literature, arts). She is currently Director of the Doctoral School (for all PhD students) of her Faculty and she is a member of the Academic Council of the Université Côte d’Azur.

Lucile has always been very active in research programs, both in her university (with local and national conventions) and in other circumstances: she was closely aligned to the research team associated with the CNRS about Written Production (managed by Denis Alamargot for 8 years), and is an expert for the European Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS).

She has published many papers mainly about writing, in collaboration with colleagues and her PhD students. Her main research interests concern the development of writing processes, linked to the cognitive system (Long Term Memory and Working Memory) and its constraints (especially the limited resources in WM) as well as the impact of emotion and motivation.

More “privately”, Lucile is the proud and obsessed mother of two marvellous girls, born January 2002 and December 2003.

John R. Hayes Award for Excellence in Writing Research

The John R. Hayes Award winner from the SIG Writing Conference in Amsterdam, 2014 was Kimberly Epting (Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Elon University, North Carolina, US) with her paper Read and think before you write: Prewriting time and level of print exposure as factors in writing. Journal of Writing Research 4(3), 239-257.  We congratulate, Kimberly on her success. She will be presenting her latest research in the plenary session on Wednesday, 6th July 2016.  I am sure you will agree that she is a worthy winner of this prestigious award. The abstract for the paper is below:

So Many Variables, Few Overlapping Effects: Investigating Situational Factors that Influence Writing Process Measures

Effective written communication requires that writers monitor and respond to their own writing during composition, employing revision to shape their expressions toward maximal effectiveness. As such, revision is an inherent part of the iterative process of writing, and subject to influence by any variables that may affect the writing process in general. Interestingly, a given variable may affect only certain aspects of the writing (including revision) process. One stream of research in my lab over the past several years has been identifying some of the situational variables that influence the writing and revision process and identifying the specific aspects affected. A custom keystroke-logging program records a variety of process measures, including insertions, deletions, substitutions, total keystrokes as well as total released characters, and prompt reviews. Pauses are also measured, defined individually in relation to transcription speeds. In 3 particular studies, we have investigated how those measures were influenced by prewriting time and print exposure (study 1), prompt valence and agent of experience (study 2), and feedback and perceived audience (study 3). The results across these studies underscore the complexity of the writing and revision process in that each factor apparently influences different and particular aspects of the process. For example, according to our results, prewriting time and type of feedback both influence prompt reviewing; yet prewriting time, but not feedback type, also affects average pause lengths whereas feedback type, but not prewriting time, also affects an overall editing measure. On the other hand, variables such as print exposure and prompt valence were not associated with significant differences in most process variables, but were associated with differences in length and quality (print exposure) or with differential content (e.g., positive, negative, cognitive words). The independent variables of interest in the studies vary greatly, but the studies are grounded in similar methodology and intentional overlap in dependent measures. As a result, we believe we have a robust and flexible research approach that allows comparison across studies to begin shaping a picture of the sensitivity of process measures and the types of factors most likely to affect each.

Conference Formats

Symposia provide an opportunity to present a topic of interest from multiple perspectives. The symposium should be proposed by 1-2 organisers. Three papers should be selected based on their thematic coherence and a discussant and chairperson should be elected. We would prefer it if the thematic contributions combined research from different universities. The organisers for each proposed symposia should submit summaries (max. 250 words) of the selected papers as well as an abstract (350 words) in which the papers are integrated into a coherent framework.

Each symposium will be scheduled for 1.5 hours: 20 minutes per speaker (15 minutes presentation, 5 minutes question time), 15 minutes for the discussion by the discussant, and 15 minutes for open discussion, convened by the chairperson.

Paper presentations describe a completed piece of research, and should include data and results.  We also encourage theoretical papers. The submission should describe the research that has been conducted in no more than 250 words. The paper sessions will be grouped into 4 papers: each paper is presented for 15 minutes, leaving 10 minutes for discussion. The sessions will be convened by a chairperson.

Short presentations involve a 5 minute presentation of a completed piece of research or it can be research that is in progress.  This will be followed by individual poster interaction and discussion. The poster (A0 format: 841 mm x 1189 mm) provides a visual depiction of the research that has been conducted. This will include a description of the design and (preliminary) results in no more than 250 words.

The short presentations will be grouped thematically into sessions of 6 presentations: after a 5 minute oral presentation of each poster (projected on a screen), there will be 30 minutes of individual poster interaction, followed by 30 minutes of plenary discussion, convened by a chairperson.

Research meetings offer opportunities for discussing prevalent research issues. Presenters explain their issue, and participants are invited to discuss this issue. Presenters should submit a summary (max. 250 words) of the research in which the issue that is to be discussed is clearly stated. These expert meetings are scheduled for 1.5 hours: presenters are allocated 45 minutes each to explain and discuss their research issue.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to information on the conference management system stating that summaries of proposed research should be max. 350 words (now amended to 250 words) no one will be penalised for submitting summaries at the longer length.

Conference Short Presentations

Please leave the poster with the Registration Team. The posters will be available for participants to read throughout the conference. An electronic version of the poster should be available for the scheduled sessions on Tuesday and will be projected onto a screen in the designated rooms. This will allow for an explanation of the key points from the research project and discussion.

Social Programme

Participants registered for the main conference are also invited to a drinks reception on the Monday, July 4, 2016.  A cultural tour of Liverpool will also be included. Travel companions are also welcome.

Beatles

The social dinner can be booked as an option payable at the same time as registration. It will be held in a beautiful venue called the Great Hall near the centre of the city. We hope as many people come along to it as possible. Transport from the conference venue to conference dinner (and return) will be arranged. There will be live music and stories. Download the Gala Dinner menu.

It is anticipated that a cultural programme will be organised that will focus on the work of British writers.

We are pleased to announce that Natalie Rice from Merchant Taylors School, Crosby will be delivering a session each day focusing on different forms of writing, through which we hope you will enjoy an interactive hands on experience at creating. Each session is designed as a stand-alone session that follows a common theme.

Day 1: Monday, 4th July 2016 Creative writing (Postcard/Travel writing) (10:30-12:00)

This will start with Bill Bryson’s ‘today I arrived in Liverpool and they were having a litter festival’ as inspiration.

Day 2: Tuesday, 5th July 2016 Song lyrics (11:00-12:30)

This will involve an examination of Beatles song lyrics etc. with a view to thinking about the effect of rhyme. In particular, there will be a focus on the question: Is it important?

Day 3: Wednesday, 6th July 2016 Snapshot of Liverpool (11:00-12:30)

This will be an opportunity to write slogans about Liverpool based on a slideshow of images.

All in all the sessions are designed to inspire and be fun. If you learn a little about Liverpool culture along the way, then that’s good too. We do hope that you will be able to come along to them.

Beatles Tour

Well not quite a magical mystery tour because we’re going to give you some hint of where you will be going: Penny Lane, Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool’s waterfront and Albert Dock, Mathew Street and the Cavern Club. The coaches depart at 17:45 on Monday, 4th July 2016. It will bring you back to the Conference Venue for the Drinks Reception we are holding at 19:00.

 

Scientific Committee

Name

Affiliation

Anne-Marie Adams

Liverpool John Moores University

Rui A. Alves

University of Porto

Barbara Arfé

University of Padova

Montserrat Castelló Badia

Ramon Llull University

Charles Bazerman

University of California

Pietro Boscolo

University of Padova

Vince Connelly

Oxford Brookes University

Julie Dockrell

University of London

Christiane K. Donahue

Dartmouth College

Michel Fayol

Blaise Pascal University, CNRS

David Galbraith

University of Southampton

Steve Graham

Arizona State University

Karen R. Harris

Arizona State University

John R. Hayes

Carnegie Mellon University

Victoria Johansson

Lund University

Marielle Leijten

University of Antwerp

Charles MacArthur

University of Delaware

Margarida Alves Martins

Higher Institute for Applied Psychology, Lisbon

Deborah McCutchen

University of Washington

Debra Myhill

University of Exeter

Thierry Olive

University of Poitiers, CNRS

Gert Rijlaarsdam

University of Amsterdam

Mark Torrance

Nottingham Trent University

Luuk Van Waes

University of Antwerp

Åsa Wengelin

University of Gothenburg

Travel and Hotels

Getting to Hope

From Liverpool John Lennon Airport to Hope Park

The closest airport to Hope Park is Liverpool John Lennon airport.    

To travel to the university it takes approximately 20 minutes by bus from the airport (traffic depending). If you are travelling to Hope from Liverpool John Lennon airport, the most direct public transport route is by bus. Alternatively, if you wish to go straight into the city centre there are frequent train and bus routes.

By Bus

The 187 operates between Hope Park and Liverpool South Parkway (the airport) every half hour during the day time Monday - Saturday. Follow this link for other buses and travel information.

By Train

You can get a train from Liverpool South Parkway train station to Lime Street train station in the city centre. The airport is a short bus journey from South Parkway station. 

By Taxi or Minibus

Private hire taxis:

Private hire minibuses:

From Manchester Airport to Hope Park

Manchester airport is the second closest Airport to Liverpool. It takes approximately one hour by National Express coach to get from Manchester airport bus terminal to Liverpool city centre. By Northern Rail train (see here for the train map) the journey also takes approximately one hour to get to South Parkway Station [a short taxi ride away from the university].

From Liverpool City Centre to Hope Park Campus

To get to Hope Park from Liverpool city centre you can get either the Arriva 75 bus or the Merseytravel 86c (alight at Woolton road), this journey takes approximately 30 - 40 minutes traffic depending.

From Heathrow to Liverpool

If you fly to Heathrow rather than Liverpool or Manchester, you can get either a train or a coach to Liverpool. It is best to book in advance to guarantee a seat and a reasonable price. National Express coaches depart from the airport while the train departs from Euston station. You can commute to Euston from the airport on the underground by taking the Piccadilly Line to Green Park, then the Victoria Line to Euston. 

For more information about Liverpool see the Visit Liverpool website.

More information on How to get to Hope.

 

Accommodation

University accommodation

The keys for the accommodation will be given out during registration. Early arrivals should report to the Security Lodge on Taggart Avenue, L16 9JD. The security lodge is directly near to the accommodation and conference venue.

Option 1

There is a variety of accommodation options situated within the grounds of the conference venue. All of which are competitively priced. They are listed as follows:

Type of Accommodation

 

Price per room/per night

En Suite & Breakfast

Hall of Residence

£55

En Suite & Breakfast

EDEN Suite (University Hotel)

£95

Room only

Taggart Lodge

£85

Room only

Green Lane Annexe Apartment

£115

Please take a look at the image gallery to view the accommodation available. In the Halls of Residence there are also catering facilities and linen and toiletries will be provided as part of the cost. In addition to the Halls of Residence we have a University hotel, the EDEN Suite. This has 17 executive style double en-suite bedrooms.  The university also has several Lodges that are available and would perhaps suit larger parties or groups who would like to share facilities. Breakfast is conveniently located for all the accommodation types.

The on campus accommodation available in Option 1 should suit most people’s needs and is conveniently placed to enjoy the vibrant research community during the conference. However, if you would like to be based in the City Centre then there is Option 2.

Option 2

Liverpool has a wide range of hotels which can be booked from hotel websites and price comparison sites.  The city centre is approximately a 25-35 minute bus ride from the University.

Mersey Ferry

 

Research School

Liverpool Hope University 2-3 July, 2016 (Registration 1st July 2016).

Following the success of the two-day Research School held at Utrecht University in 2014, the SIGwriting2016 conference will be preceded by this again. Although it is primarily designed for PhD candidates and other junior researchers, all are welcome if you feel it might be useful. 

The theme of the Research School is People, products and processes: the triple narrative that awakens writing.

The main objective is to provide an opportunity for researchers to engage in an initiative focusing on the integration of a number of different research and statistical methods identified as important to the field of writing research. There is increasing evidence that the field of writing research is advancing through the inclusion of mixed methods research. Previously diametrically opposed research methods e.g. eyetracker and qualitative interviews are being explored within the same research programme. Thus, arguably, providing a more comprehensive insight into the characteristics of the writer, the processes they engage in and the products they produce.

Therefore, the intention is to take researchers from an understanding of what the learner contributes to the process of writing, to how this might be analysed at more fine-grained grammatical levels and with different populations of writers (e.g. dyslexia and dyspraxia), to the technology we have available to us to determine the underlying processes that explain differences in the written product and finish with a representation of some of the important contributions making a difference to education through interventions as well as a discussion on identity and regulation in writing through qualitative research methods. Thus, the workshops provided by experts will stimulate and cement research at the early stages of a research career and allow researchers to gain a broader understanding of how multiple perspectives interact in research as well as the techniques used to explore them.

Research School Programme

There are a couple of changes to the original programme we advertised. We arranged for registration to start earlier than planned (you can register at any point on the Friday) and have developed a couple of sessions that are designed to get to know you all better, if you do happen to arrive earlier. We have also added a registration point on Saturday, 2nd July 2016.
There is also no need to select which workshops you would like to attend as the time slots have been constructed so that people have the opportunity to learn from all the sessions. The aim of the weekend is to gain a greater understanding of your own research perspective and that of others so that there might be some realisation of the synergies between them. It is common now for research papers to include multiple methods.  Hopefully, this will provide excellent discussion points.
We will meet in Our Place (Student Union) at 7 pm before heading into Liverpool City Centre about 7.30 pm for those of you who would like to do this.
Please see Research School Schedule Research School Updated 24/06/2016

 

The programme is encapsulated within the following themes:

Theme

International Experts

Theme A: Learning to write and learner characteristics

A1: Examining the characteristics of the learner in school

A2: Structural Equation Modelling and learner characteristics

 

Anne-Marie Adams, UK

Teresa Limpo, Portugal

Theme B: Capturing and analysing writing process data

B1: Capturing and analysing handwriting data using Openhandwrite

B2: Analysing process data

 

Mark Torrance, UK

Guido Nottbusch, Germany

 

Theme C: Assessing and deciphering text quality

C1: Analysing children’s written text products capturing development

C2: Curriculum based measures of assessment of written text products

 

 

Vince Connelly, UK

Julie Dockrell, UK

 

Theme D: Interventions, identity and qualitative methods

D1: Interventions and writing education

D2: Identity, regulation and qualitative methods

 

 

Eva Lindgren, Sweden

Montserrat Castello, Spain

 

Additional contributions to the programme

SPSS and Data Analysis

Chair, Expert Panel

 

Simon Davies, UK

David Galbraith, UK

For more information about conference fees for the Research School visit the registration tab. There is a Research School evening social event included in the price.

 

Research School Short Presentations

Please place leave posters with the Registration Team and we will arrange for them to be displayed. The boards are situated in the first floor atrium area. An electronic copy of the poster should be available for the scheduled sessions on Saturday and will be projected onto a screen in the designated rooms. This will allow for an explanation of the key points from the research project and discussion.

European Literacy Network

The research school is supported by a grant from the European Literacy Network (ELN) Cost Action IS1041. This has enabled the following nine trainees to be awarded bursaries up to 600 Euros. The trainees were selected in accordance with the rules of ELN, which include ensuring that there is balance across countries in the bursaries awarded; and that participants from the research school location (UK) were not eligible. All registered participants were automatically considered for the bursary. 
Luisa Pereira, Portugal
Vibeke Rønneberg, Norway
Christine Sontag, Germany
Natalia Bilici, Luxembourg
Hampus Holm, Sweden
Rannveig Oddsdóttir, Iceland
Peter Hobel, Denmark
María Arrimada, Spain
Baran Johannson, Sweden

Exciting new SIG Writing Initiative

The SIG Writing Best Early Stage Short Talk Award (or simply the SIG Writing BESST Award) was announced at the SIG Writing business meeting at the EARLI conference in Limassol recently. The winner will receive a monetary prize of 400€ and the will be announced during the main conference. Click on the following link to find out more details about this great opportunity for recognition of the work new scientists to the area of writing research are doing: SIG Writing BESST Award.

 

Call for Papers for Research School

For each day of the Research School, participants select one out of two themes related to their own research and/or interest. Participants have the unique opportunity to discuss their projects with other writing researchers and to get valuable feedback from experts in the field in expert round table sessions.

To facilitate discussion, each participant is asked to prepare a short presentation of his/her research and a poster. These presentations will be thematically grouped.

Research School activities are specifically intended for master and PhD students, as well as graduates who received their doctorate within the last two years. To participate in the Research School junior researchers must submit a proposal for a short (poster) presentation.

Short presentations involve a 5 minute presentation of a completed piece of research or research in progress, followed by individual poster interaction and discussion. The poster (A0 format: 841 mm X 1189mm) provides a visual representation of the conducted research. Submissions for short presentations should describe the research, including (preliminary) results, in max. 350 words. It is possible to submit the same proposal for both SIGwriting2016 and the Research School.

 

Research School and SIGwriting2016 Schedule

First call

May 10, 2015

Second call/open submission

September 1, 2015

Start registrations

September 10, 2015

Deadline for proposals

December 15, 2015

Proposals reviewed/confirmed

March 1, 2016

Deadline for early bird registration

April 1, 2016

Deadline registrations

May 15, 2016

Deadline cancellation*

May 31, 2016

Conference programme available

June 15, 2016

Research School

July 2-3, 2016

SIGwriting2016 Conference

July 4-6, 2016

Programme Schedule (to be confirmed)

Registration workshops

On each Research School day two themes will be highlighted, through lectures during the morning, followed by workshops in the afternoon. More information about the themes will be provided in due course.

There will be a registration process for the workshops in which you will state both your first and second choice. Workshops will then be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Once advertised, we ask you to register as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

Poster guidelines

Poster sessions offer researchers the chance to present their work in a visual format and offer opportunities for interaction.

Research School poster presentation

Posters are grouped thematically. Each presenter introduces his/her poster in a one-minute pitch. After the introductions, the presenters stand next to their posters to talk with interested attendees. We recommend you prepare a brief presentation (max. 5 minutes) to explain your research in further detail.

For more information on SIGwriting2016 short presentations, click here.

The poster should be A0 size (841 mm X 1189mm), oriented vertically or horizontally. Materials for fixing posters to the walls will be provided. It is recommended that the presenter has a number of copies of the poster in the form of handouts in A4 format to distribute to interested participants. Search YouTube videos for tips on ‘how to create a poster with powerpoint’.

A poster should inform the audience about:

1. Title and authors
2. Research problem or objective of the project
3. Research questions and/or hypotheses
4. Method: a description of the sample, design, materials and procedure of the study
5. Analyses of the study
6. Most important/expected results
7. Conclusions, theoretical and/or practical implications

A poster should be as self-explanatory as possible. To reach this aim, make it clear, structured, concise, and attractive.

Clarity and structure: The title and authors’ names and affiliations should be at the top of the poster. It is often useful to have sections indicating, for example, the aims of the research, the methods and subjects involved, and the materials used. Other sections might highlight the most important results and the conclusions. Diagrams, graphs and tables can be used effectively to visualise results.

Conciseness: As space is very limited, try to present the most important information only and effectively. Don’t overcrowd the poster with too much data or too much text. The title and the conclusion are the most important “eye catchers”. Make sure that the message you want to convey is transported by the information and not lost in it.

Attractiveness: Be aware that your poster is being viewed from a distance. Therefore, all text should be large enough to be read from a distance of about 1.5 metres. You can use background colours and arrangements of columns or rows to connect portions visually that are related conceptually. Such layouts help guide the audience through the poster.