English Literature

UCAS Code: Q320 Duration: 3 years

Overview

Hear from a tutor and student about studying English Literature at Liverpool Hope.

The degree in English Literature at Liverpool Hope enables you to explore a wide range of canonical and popular texts from the Middle Ages to the present day. Throughout your three years of study you will be taught by staff with research expertise in a broad range of fields, from Chaucer to contemporary popular literature. You will be taught in lectures, seminars, and small tutorial groups by teaching staff with a strong international research profile. You will also have the opportunity to meet with your lecturers for individual feedback and advice. We pride ourselves on offering a challenging and stimulating degree with a wide range of innovative teaching and assessment methods. Our distinctive commitment to small group teaching allows us to help each individual student to develop sophisticated analytical and communication skills through working both independently and in groups. A high proportion of our students attain a 1st or a 2:i degree; this achievement recognises that they have attained highly valued skills enabling them to pursue a wide range of careers after graduation. 

Why choose this subject?

  • English Literature staff have significant international research publications in specialist areas such as Chaucer, Victorian literature, narrative theory, popular literatures, travel writing, war poetry and prose, and American literature
  • Your tutors sit on the Boards for a range of research networks such as the Collegium for African American Research, the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society, and the International Anthony Burgess Foundation. They play leading roles in the Liverpool Travel Writing Seminar and the Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.
  • In the 2013 National Student Survey, over 90 per cent of English students said the course was intellectually stimulating, and that staff are enthusiastic about what they teach.

 

Subject Guides

Read more about studying English Literature at Liverpool Hope in our English Literature Subject Guide. 

  

 English Literature Subject Leaflet

 

 

English Literature Subject Guide 2015

 

 

 

The programme specifications for this subject can be downloaded below.

English Literature

 

This degree is available as a full time course for all international students. For more information about International students studying at Liverpool Hope, visit www.hope.ac.uk/international

Curriculum

The English Literature Curriculum

Year 1

  • In Year 1 you will follow a structured programme of lectures and seminars/ workshops giving you an overview of the genres of poetry, drama, and narrative and introducing you to a range of critical approaches and to the terminology associated with these.
  • You will examine a variety of texts across all literary genres and will be introduced to theoretical approaches that provide different perspectives on these texts. Small-group tutorials are devoted to enhancing your writing skills.
  • There is a range of assessment methods, from the traditional (essay and examination) to the innovative (critical précis and portfolio), that help you to build skills incrementally.

All Literature students will study the following:

Analysing Prose, Poetry and Drama

This is a lecture strand that focuses on a broad range of texts from different generic traditions, providing students with background information and historical context, suggesting ways that such information can be used to enrich the reading of a given text.

Critical Approaches to Prose, Poetry and Drama

This lecture strand examines the same texts studied for Analysing Prose, Poetry and Drama through the lens of different critical perspectives, examining the implications that their application would have on the interpretation of the texts studied.

Close Reading

This is an interactive seminar strand that provides an overview of the development of the three traditional generic traditions: prose, poetry, and drama. The prose examined ranges from fairy tale/ fable to the essay, short story, and novel. The poetry selected for close reading introduces students to a range of poetic modes and forms: sonnets, lyrical poetry, narrative poetry, elegiac verse, dramatic monologues.

Text and Context

Seminars on Text and Context examine the same texts studied in Close Reading seminars, placing them in relation to developing traditions, historical developments, and different critical perspectives.

Writing Workshop

Through working with different types of writing, such as the journal, précis, review, essay, the Writing Workshop facilitates the development of increasingly sophisticated thinking and the nuances and fine distinctions necessary for effective academic writing.

Single Honours Literature students will also study the following:

Great Books, Great Ideas

This lecture strand provides students with a framework that sets out, in general terms, the significance of particular texts within a developing discourse on a particular issue or theme.

Legacies and Transformations

This lecture strand examines a range of examples of the way particular themes examined in Great Books, Great Ideas lectures have been studied in a range of literary texts, providing examples and suggestions for further contextual and developmental reading.

Text and Idea

This is an interactive seminar strand that investigates the development of particular ideas and themes in literature, such as the journey and the search, visions of Heaven and Hell, conceptions of power and utopia, the idea of originality and authorship, thoughts on self and society. Students examine works such as Homer’s The Odyssey (the journey) or chapters from the Bible such as Genesis and Revelations (Heaven and Hell) with a view to understanding the nature of the dynamic elements that are continually referenced within literature and western thought.

Textual Legacies

This seminar strand provides students with examples of the way elements of the core texts studied in Text and Idea seminars have been employed in subsequent literature. So, for example, a study of the Bible might be followed by exploration of Milton’s Paradise Lost, Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell or H.G. Wells’s The Island of Dr Moreau.

Personal Development Workshop

This workshop ensures that students are made aware of the disciplinary and transferable skills that they are developing and helps students develop a secure foundation in the research and creative problem-solving skills necessary for Single Honours study.

Year 2

  • In Year 2 you will study particular historical periods in greater detail. At this level, the programme is designed to help you to discover the ways in which knowledge of the literary, cultural, and intellectual history of a period can enrich your understanding of particular authors and texts.
  • Tasks and assessments are designed to help you develop the research and project-planning skills needed for longer and more complex academic projects.
  • Assessments include a single-author study, a comparative essay, synoptic examination, and a problem-based learning exercise.

All Literature students will study the following:

English Literature from the Glorious Revolution to the Fin de Siècle

This lecture strand will examine a broad range of literary texts from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century, examining how literature engages with intellectual, social and political developments over the course of the era.

Restoration to Early Romantic Literature

In the first term this seminar strand will trace significant aspects of the long eighteenth century, for example concerning the nature of reality and truth, the poetic imagination, the rise of the novel, and the diversity and complexity of poetic forms being used in the early years of Romanticism. The literary and philosophical ideas in evidence within the primary texts will be considered against the backdrop of changing social and political attitudes towards, for example, individual and national identity, and the nature of liberty.

Textual Analysis of Nineteenth-Century Literature

In the second term the Textual Analysis of Nineteenth-Century Literature seminar strand will examine the development of English literature from the Romantic period, the Victorian era, and the writing of the fin de siècle. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of the French Revolution on English Literature, the development of feminist thinking in the Victorian era, the impact of the publication of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species (1859) and cultural anxieties reflected in gothic literature and detective fiction of the fin de siècle.

Major Authors of Pre-Twentieth-Century Literature

This tutorial strand focuses on the work of one or two writers within the context of the literature, ideas, and cultural history of their time. The authors examined will vary from year to year, but will include writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen, Dickens, and Hardy.

Single Honours Literature students will also study the following:

Contextualising the Nineteenth Century

This lecture strand will provide more detailed information on the intellectual history of the period (including scientific and social theories) and contemporaneous developments in the arts.

Medieval to Early Modern Literature

In the first term this seminar strand examines the poetry, prose and drama of the late medieval and early modern periods. Close examination of authors such as Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson and Donne will underpin an interrogation of the traditional historiographical and critical divisions between medieval and Renaissance periodization.

American Literature

In the second term, seminars on American Literature trace the impact of Romantic writers and theorists on the writers and literary productions of the American Renaissance. As American literature begins self-consciously to differentiate itself from English literature while influenced heavily by it, the resulting borrowings of literary forms such as the historical novel, the sentimental novel, and the gothic tradition will be traced; and the transformations that occur as these are used to treat native subjects will be examined. The rise of realism will also be examined in relation to the development of social novels in England.

Archival Research and Publishing History: Problem Based Learning.

This tutorial strand is designed to provide single honours students with training on the use of archival resources and exposure to issues related to the production, publication, and reception of a particular text. This tutorial strand will examine, as appropriate, manuscript variations, serialisation, illustrations, the production of different editions, the marketing of the text, contemporary reviews and subsequent re-evaluations, reader responses, and literary responses to selected literary texts.

Year 3

  • In Year 3, you will engage with current critical issues, theories, and methodologies. You will evaluate the implications and possibilities made available by different approaches and theories in relation to the understanding of particular texts, genres, and themes. 
  • You will interrogate the nature and formation of the literary canon through detailed analysis of a wide range of genres, focusing primarily on 20th century and contemporary literature.
  • There is a wide range of innovative assessment methods available at this level including portfolio, synoptic examination and extended research essay.

All Literature students will study the following:

Modernism and Literature

This lectures strand will help to contextualise Modernist literature through an interdisciplinary approach, positioning it in relation to the intellectual history of the period (including scientific and social theories), contemporaneous developments in the arts, and reflections from the period of the role and nature of art/literature and the artist/writer in society.

Modernism

In seminars on Modernism students examine and analyse a range of texts from England, Ireland, and the United States written during the Modernist period such as those by James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, and Ernest Hemingway. These texts will be examined through close readings that will enable students to develop their own understanding of the textual strategies, stylistic innovations, and thematic concerns of the literature of this period.

Honours Seminar

In the second term, students also participate in an Honours Seminar. There is an element of choice introduced here as students can focus upon contemporary issues in criticism or historicizing literature. Here, issues explored will include the use and misuse of primary and archival resources, the problematic nature of master narratives of history, and the necessarily partial and distorted nature of any context constructed for the interpretative framing of a text. Combined Honours Students conduct an extended research project based on their Honours Seminar work. Recent research project titles include:

  • ‘Experimental Responses to Romance, Desire and the Love Plot’
  • ‘Your Novel Has Leveled Up: Shared Concepts and Properties in Experimental Novels and Video Games’
  • ‘The Unverdorben and the Norma(l): Variations of Irony in Martin Amis’s Time's Arrow and Graham Rawle's Woman’s World

Theoretical Models and Research Methods

A tutorial strand on Theoretical Models in the first term enables students to examine some of the formative theories that informed modernist thinking and practice, such as those of Freud and Bergson. In the Second term, the tutorial strand focuses on Research Methods, helping students to develop and implement their research and project planning skills as they pursue their extended research project or dissertation.

During Year 3, Single Honours Literature students also study the following:

Canon Formation and Critical Controversy

This lecture series provides students with a systematic exposure to thinking about the practice and process of canon formation, critiques of different models of culture, and frameworks for the analysis and positioning of popular literature.

Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice

This lecture series on Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice allows students to examine recent theoretical approaches such as trauma theory, the maturing of postcolonial perspectives and the examination of intersectionality in relation to the construction of identity, the contribution of disability studies to the understanding of literature, and the now common awareness of the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of literature.

The Problem of Popular Literature

In the first term the seminar series on Popular Literature interrogates ideas of cultural hierarchy and generic fixity. These seminars focus on a particular popular genre such as the detective story, examining the dynamics of textual practice in relation to the conventions of the genre studied. A central element of this seminar strand involves critiquing the possibilities and limitations of readings of the texts and genres by particular critics.

Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice

This seminar/workshop, which accompanies the lecture strand on Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice, is designed to make students more self-conscious of their own research and critical practice as they pursue their dissertations.

Dissertation

Single Honours students receive one-to-one tutorials during Year 3 as they conduct sustained, supervised independent study in the form of a dissertation and showcase this research in an Honours Conference. Dissertations completed in recent years include:

  • ‘The Rise of the Novel and the Exploration of Societal Development: Gender and Class in Richardson, Edgeworth and Austen’
  • ‘The Evolution of Serialisation as a Method of Publication from Charles Dickens’s The Pickwick Papers to his final novel The Mystery of Edwin Drood
  •  ‘Back from the Front: Rediscovering Self and Society in First World War Literature’
  • ‘High Spirits – the Beautiful and the Drunk: Representations of Alcohol in the Short Fictions of F. Scott Fitzgerald’
  • ‘Marriage and the Mid-Twentieth-Century American Dream in Richard Yates’s Revolutionary Road, Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? And Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman

You may also be interested in...

Creative Writing

Drama & Theatre Studies

English Language

Media & Communication

Entry Requirements

2015 Entry Requirements

The offer level for 2015 entry will be BCC - BBB at A Level or 260 - 300 UCAS points.

In addition, applicants require an A2 level (or equivalent) in English Literature, English Language or Literature/Language. Applicants with other humanities subjects may also be considered. 

UCAS points offers can be achieved in many ways, the following are just a few examples of how you could achieve our entry requirements:

  • Three A Levels with grades of BBC or above
  • Two A Levels with grades AB and one AS Level grade A
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF) with grade DMM
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF) with grade M
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and A Level with grade of C
  • CACHE Diploma at grade B
  • Access Diploma with a minimum of 30 Level 3 credits at merit or above

If you have any questions about your qualifications, please contact enquiry@hope.ac.uk or call 0151 291 3111.

Useful Links

How to apply

Admissions Policy

UCAS

Course Combinations

English Literature is available as a BA Single Honours degree, UCAS code Q320.

It can be studied as a combined honours degree with the following subjects:

English Literature and Christian Theology UCAS code VQ36
English Literature and Creative Writing* UCAS code 2B42
English Literature and Drama & Theatre Studies UCAS code WQ43
English Literature and Early Childhood UCAS code QX33
English Literature and Education UCAS code XQJ3
English Literature and English Language UCAS code Q301
English Literature and International Relations UCAS code QL32
English Literature and Media & Communication UCAS code QP33
English Literature and Music UCAS code QW33
English Literature and Philosophy & Ethics UCAS code QV3M
English Literature and Politics UCAS code QL3F
English Literature and Social Policy UCAS code QL3K

All course combinations result in a BA Hons degree.

English Literature is also available to study with Primary Teaching Honours degree (BA QTS), UCAS code X1QH.

*available from September 2015 

Employability

A degree in English Literature will equip you with a host of skills that will prepare you for the world of work whatever career path you choose. Graduates enter a wide variety of careers including public relations, marketing, journalism, management, politics and multimedia communications.

A large proportion of graduates also choose to further their studies in English or pursue a PGCE to join the teaching profession. You may also wish to study for a further postgraduate degree, such as our masters in Popular Literature.

Leanne Maguire graduated from Liverpool Hope in 2010 with a First Class Honours degree in English Literature. After graduation, she enrolled in the Hope MA in Popular Literatures. She said: “The decision to return to Hope for postgraduate study was an easy one, I thoroughly enjoyed my undergraduate degree at the University and had established a great relationship with my tutors that I was eager to continue.

“My tutors’ support was invaluable; I had two children within fifteen months and continued studying full time, and they helped me to keep my focus and balance my workload accordingly. My tutors have always encouraged me to pursue my independent ideas, and this has helped to develop my confidence and writing style. I feel I have a valuable critical contribution to bring to the table. I am looking forward to completing this Masters Degree and embarking on my next literary journey.”

Hayley Flynn graduated from Liverpool Hope in 2014 with a First Class Honours degree in English Literature and is now studying on a Masters Degree programme. Hayley says "I originally chose to study literature at Liverpool Hope because of its incredibly friendly atmosphere, an aspect which makes Hope truly unique. Although the enthusiasm of the tutors made all of the modules enjoyable, the thing I enjoyed most about the course was the chance to choose my own specific area of research in the optional final year dissertation. As I was particularly interested in the Victorian period this gave me the opportunity to fully explore resources such as nineteenth-century newspapers, which was really exciting. My experience at Hope, and the wonderful support and encouragement of the staff in the English Department, gave me the confidence to pursue the subject further than I thought I could. Because of this I am now studying for a Masters by Research in English Literature at University of Birmingham, which I hope to extend into a PhD."

Overview

Hear from a tutor and student about studying English Literature at Liverpool Hope.

The degree in English Literature at Liverpool Hope enables you to explore a wide range of canonical and popular texts from the Middle Ages to the present day. Throughout your three years of study you will be taught by staff with research expertise in a broad range of fields, from Chaucer to contemporary popular literature. You will be taught in lectures, seminars, and small tutorial groups by teaching staff with a strong international research profile. You will also have the opportunity to meet with your lecturers for individual feedback and advice. We pride ourselves on offering a challenging and stimulating degree with a wide range of innovative teaching and assessment methods. Our distinctive commitment to small group teaching allows us to help each individual student to develop sophisticated analytical and communication skills through working both independently and in groups. A high proportion of our students attain a 1st or a 2:i degree; this achievement recognises that they have attained highly valued skills enabling them to pursue a wide range of careers after graduation. 

Why choose this subject?

  • English Literature staff have significant international research publications in specialist areas such as Chaucer, Victorian literature, narrative theory, popular literatures, travel writing, war poetry and prose, and American literature
  • Your tutors sit on the Boards for a range of research networks such as the Collegium for African American Research, the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society, and the International Anthony Burgess Foundation. They play leading roles in the Liverpool Travel Writing Seminar and the Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.
  • In the 2013 National Student Survey, over 90 per cent of English students said the course was intellectually stimulating, and that staff are enthusiastic about what they teach.

 

Subject Guides

Read more about studying English Literature at Liverpool Hope in our English Literature Subject Guide. 

  

 English Literature Subject Leaflet

 

 

English Literature Subject Guide 2015

 

 

 

The programme specifications for this subject can be downloaded below.

English Literature

 

This degree is available as a full time course for all international students. For more information about International students studying at Liverpool Hope, visit www.hope.ac.uk/international

Curriculum

The English Literature Curriculum

Year 1

  • In Year 1 you will follow a structured programme of lectures and seminars/ workshops giving you an overview of the genres of poetry, drama, and narrative and introducing you to a range of critical approaches and to the terminology associated with these.
  • You will examine a variety of texts across all literary genres and will be introduced to theoretical approaches that provide different perspectives on these texts. Small-group tutorials are devoted to enhancing your writing skills.
  • There is a range of assessment methods, from the traditional (essay and examination) to the innovative (critical précis and portfolio), that help you to build skills incrementally.

All Literature students will study the following:

Analysing Prose, Poetry and Drama

This is a lecture strand that focuses on a broad range of texts from different generic traditions, providing students with background information and historical context, suggesting ways that such information can be used to enrich the reading of a given text.

Critical Approaches to Prose, Poetry and Drama

This lecture strand examines the same texts studied for Analysing Prose, Poetry and Drama through the lens of different critical perspectives, examining the implications that their application would have on the interpretation of the texts studied.

Close Reading

This is an interactive seminar strand that provides an overview of the development of the three traditional generic traditions: prose, poetry, and drama. The prose examined ranges from fairy tale/ fable to the essay, short story, and novel. The poetry selected for close reading introduces students to a range of poetic modes and forms: sonnets, lyrical poetry, narrative poetry, elegiac verse, dramatic monologues.

Text and Context

Seminars on Text and Context examine the same texts studied in Close Reading seminars, placing them in relation to developing traditions, historical developments, and different critical perspectives.

Writing Workshop

Through working with different types of writing, such as the journal, précis, review, essay, the Writing Workshop facilitates the development of increasingly sophisticated thinking and the nuances and fine distinctions necessary for effective academic writing.

Single Honours Literature students will also study the following:

Great Books, Great Ideas

This lecture strand provides students with a framework that sets out, in general terms, the significance of particular texts within a developing discourse on a particular issue or theme.

Legacies and Transformations

This lecture strand examines a range of examples of the way particular themes examined in Great Books, Great Ideas lectures have been studied in a range of literary texts, providing examples and suggestions for further contextual and developmental reading.

Text and Idea

This is an interactive seminar strand that investigates the development of particular ideas and themes in literature, such as the journey and the search, visions of Heaven and Hell, conceptions of power and utopia, the idea of originality and authorship, thoughts on self and society. Students examine works such as Homer’s The Odyssey (the journey) or chapters from the Bible such as Genesis and Revelations (Heaven and Hell) with a view to understanding the nature of the dynamic elements that are continually referenced within literature and western thought.

Textual Legacies

This seminar strand provides students with examples of the way elements of the core texts studied in Text and Idea seminars have been employed in subsequent literature. So, for example, a study of the Bible might be followed by exploration of Milton’s Paradise Lost, Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell or H.G. Wells’s The Island of Dr Moreau.

Personal Development Workshop

This workshop ensures that students are made aware of the disciplinary and transferable skills that they are developing and helps students develop a secure foundation in the research and creative problem-solving skills necessary for Single Honours study.

Year 2

  • In Year 2 you will study particular historical periods in greater detail. At this level, the programme is designed to help you to discover the ways in which knowledge of the literary, cultural, and intellectual history of a period can enrich your understanding of particular authors and texts.
  • Tasks and assessments are designed to help you develop the research and project-planning skills needed for longer and more complex academic projects.
  • Assessments include a single-author study, a comparative essay, synoptic examination, and a problem-based learning exercise.

All Literature students will study the following:

English Literature from the Glorious Revolution to the Fin de Siècle

This lecture strand will examine a broad range of literary texts from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century, examining how literature engages with intellectual, social and political developments over the course of the era.

Restoration to Early Romantic Literature

In the first term this seminar strand will trace significant aspects of the long eighteenth century, for example concerning the nature of reality and truth, the poetic imagination, the rise of the novel, and the diversity and complexity of poetic forms being used in the early years of Romanticism. The literary and philosophical ideas in evidence within the primary texts will be considered against the backdrop of changing social and political attitudes towards, for example, individual and national identity, and the nature of liberty.

Textual Analysis of Nineteenth-Century Literature

In the second term the Textual Analysis of Nineteenth-Century Literature seminar strand will examine the development of English literature from the Romantic period, the Victorian era, and the writing of the fin de siècle. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of the French Revolution on English Literature, the development of feminist thinking in the Victorian era, the impact of the publication of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species (1859) and cultural anxieties reflected in gothic literature and detective fiction of the fin de siècle.

Major Authors of Pre-Twentieth-Century Literature

This tutorial strand focuses on the work of one or two writers within the context of the literature, ideas, and cultural history of their time. The authors examined will vary from year to year, but will include writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen, Dickens, and Hardy.

Single Honours Literature students will also study the following:

Contextualising the Nineteenth Century

This lecture strand will provide more detailed information on the intellectual history of the period (including scientific and social theories) and contemporaneous developments in the arts.

Medieval to Early Modern Literature

In the first term this seminar strand examines the poetry, prose and drama of the late medieval and early modern periods. Close examination of authors such as Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson and Donne will underpin an interrogation of the traditional historiographical and critical divisions between medieval and Renaissance periodization.

American Literature

In the second term, seminars on American Literature trace the impact of Romantic writers and theorists on the writers and literary productions of the American Renaissance. As American literature begins self-consciously to differentiate itself from English literature while influenced heavily by it, the resulting borrowings of literary forms such as the historical novel, the sentimental novel, and the gothic tradition will be traced; and the transformations that occur as these are used to treat native subjects will be examined. The rise of realism will also be examined in relation to the development of social novels in England.

Archival Research and Publishing History: Problem Based Learning.

This tutorial strand is designed to provide single honours students with training on the use of archival resources and exposure to issues related to the production, publication, and reception of a particular text. This tutorial strand will examine, as appropriate, manuscript variations, serialisation, illustrations, the production of different editions, the marketing of the text, contemporary reviews and subsequent re-evaluations, reader responses, and literary responses to selected literary texts.

Year 3

  • In Year 3, you will engage with current critical issues, theories, and methodologies. You will evaluate the implications and possibilities made available by different approaches and theories in relation to the understanding of particular texts, genres, and themes. 
  • You will interrogate the nature and formation of the literary canon through detailed analysis of a wide range of genres, focusing primarily on 20th century and contemporary literature.
  • There is a wide range of innovative assessment methods available at this level including portfolio, synoptic examination and extended research essay.

All Literature students will study the following:

Modernism and Literature

This lectures strand will help to contextualise Modernist literature through an interdisciplinary approach, positioning it in relation to the intellectual history of the period (including scientific and social theories), contemporaneous developments in the arts, and reflections from the period of the role and nature of art/literature and the artist/writer in society.

Modernism

In seminars on Modernism students examine and analyse a range of texts from England, Ireland, and the United States written during the Modernist period such as those by James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, and Ernest Hemingway. These texts will be examined through close readings that will enable students to develop their own understanding of the textual strategies, stylistic innovations, and thematic concerns of the literature of this period.

Honours Seminar

In the second term, students also participate in an Honours Seminar. There is an element of choice introduced here as students can focus upon contemporary issues in criticism or historicizing literature. Here, issues explored will include the use and misuse of primary and archival resources, the problematic nature of master narratives of history, and the necessarily partial and distorted nature of any context constructed for the interpretative framing of a text. Combined Honours Students conduct an extended research project based on their Honours Seminar work. Recent research project titles include:

  • ‘Experimental Responses to Romance, Desire and the Love Plot’
  • ‘Your Novel Has Leveled Up: Shared Concepts and Properties in Experimental Novels and Video Games’
  • ‘The Unverdorben and the Norma(l): Variations of Irony in Martin Amis’s Time's Arrow and Graham Rawle's Woman’s World

Theoretical Models and Research Methods

A tutorial strand on Theoretical Models in the first term enables students to examine some of the formative theories that informed modernist thinking and practice, such as those of Freud and Bergson. In the Second term, the tutorial strand focuses on Research Methods, helping students to develop and implement their research and project planning skills as they pursue their extended research project or dissertation.

During Year 3, Single Honours Literature students also study the following:

Canon Formation and Critical Controversy

This lecture series provides students with a systematic exposure to thinking about the practice and process of canon formation, critiques of different models of culture, and frameworks for the analysis and positioning of popular literature.

Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice

This lecture series on Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice allows students to examine recent theoretical approaches such as trauma theory, the maturing of postcolonial perspectives and the examination of intersectionality in relation to the construction of identity, the contribution of disability studies to the understanding of literature, and the now common awareness of the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of literature.

The Problem of Popular Literature

In the first term the seminar series on Popular Literature interrogates ideas of cultural hierarchy and generic fixity. These seminars focus on a particular popular genre such as the detective story, examining the dynamics of textual practice in relation to the conventions of the genre studied. A central element of this seminar strand involves critiquing the possibilities and limitations of readings of the texts and genres by particular critics.

Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice

This seminar/workshop, which accompanies the lecture strand on Contemporary Issues and Critical Practice, is designed to make students more self-conscious of their own research and critical practice as they pursue their dissertations.

Dissertation

Single Honours students receive one-to-one tutorials during Year 3 as they conduct sustained, supervised independent study in the form of a dissertation and showcase this research in an Honours Conference. Dissertations completed in recent years include:

  • ‘The Rise of the Novel and the Exploration of Societal Development: Gender and Class in Richardson, Edgeworth and Austen’
  • ‘The Evolution of Serialisation as a Method of Publication from Charles Dickens’s The Pickwick Papers to his final novel The Mystery of Edwin Drood
  •  ‘Back from the Front: Rediscovering Self and Society in First World War Literature’
  • ‘High Spirits – the Beautiful and the Drunk: Representations of Alcohol in the Short Fictions of F. Scott Fitzgerald’
  • ‘Marriage and the Mid-Twentieth-Century American Dream in Richard Yates’s Revolutionary Road, Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? And Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman

You may also be interested in...

Creative Writing

Drama & Theatre Studies

English Language

Media & Communication

Entry Requirements

2015 Entry Requirements

The offer level for 2015 entry will be BCC - BBB at A Level or 260 - 300 UCAS points.

In addition, applicants require an A2 level (or equivalent) in English Literature, English Language or Literature/Language. Applicants with other humanities subjects may also be considered. 

UCAS points offers can be achieved in many ways, the following are just a few examples of how you could achieve our entry requirements:

  • Three A Levels with grades of BBC or above
  • Two A Levels with grades AB and one AS Level grade A
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF) with grade DMM
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF) with grade M
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and A Level with grade of C
  • CACHE Diploma at grade B
  • Access Diploma with a minimum of 30 Level 3 credits at merit or above

If you have any questions about your qualifications, please contact enquiry@hope.ac.uk or call 0151 291 3111.

Useful Links

How to apply

Admissions Policy

UCAS

Course Combinations

English Literature is available as a BA Single Honours degree, UCAS code Q320.

It can be studied as a combined honours degree with the following subjects:

English Literature and Christian Theology UCAS code VQ36
English Literature and Creative Writing* UCAS code 2B42
English Literature and Drama & Theatre Studies UCAS code WQ43
English Literature and Early Childhood UCAS code QX33
English Literature and Education UCAS code XQJ3
English Literature and English Language UCAS code Q301
English Literature and International Relations UCAS code QL32
English Literature and Media & Communication UCAS code QP33
English Literature and Music UCAS code QW33
English Literature and Philosophy & Ethics UCAS code QV3M
English Literature and Politics UCAS code QL3F
English Literature and Social Policy UCAS code QL3K

All course combinations result in a BA Hons degree.

English Literature is also available to study with Primary Teaching Honours degree (BA QTS), UCAS code X1QH.

*available from September 2015 

Employability

A degree in English Literature will equip you with a host of skills that will prepare you for the world of work whatever career path you choose. Graduates enter a wide variety of careers including public relations, marketing, journalism, management, politics and multimedia communications.

A large proportion of graduates also choose to further their studies in English or pursue a PGCE to join the teaching profession. You may also wish to study for a further postgraduate degree, such as our masters in Popular Literature.

Leanne Maguire graduated from Liverpool Hope in 2010 with a First Class Honours degree in English Literature. After graduation, she enrolled in the Hope MA in Popular Literatures. She said: “The decision to return to Hope for postgraduate study was an easy one, I thoroughly enjoyed my undergraduate degree at the University and had established a great relationship with my tutors that I was eager to continue.

“My tutors’ support was invaluable; I had two children within fifteen months and continued studying full time, and they helped me to keep my focus and balance my workload accordingly. My tutors have always encouraged me to pursue my independent ideas, and this has helped to develop my confidence and writing style. I feel I have a valuable critical contribution to bring to the table. I am looking forward to completing this Masters Degree and embarking on my next literary journey.”

Hayley Flynn graduated from Liverpool Hope in 2014 with a First Class Honours degree in English Literature and is now studying on a Masters Degree programme. Hayley says "I originally chose to study literature at Liverpool Hope because of its incredibly friendly atmosphere, an aspect which makes Hope truly unique. Although the enthusiasm of the tutors made all of the modules enjoyable, the thing I enjoyed most about the course was the chance to choose my own specific area of research in the optional final year dissertation. As I was particularly interested in the Victorian period this gave me the opportunity to fully explore resources such as nineteenth-century newspapers, which was really exciting. My experience at Hope, and the wonderful support and encouragement of the staff in the English Department, gave me the confidence to pursue the subject further than I thought I could. Because of this I am now studying for a Masters by Research in English Literature at University of Birmingham, which I hope to extend into a PhD."

Course Contact Details

Student Recruitment

+44 (0) 151 291 3111

enquiry@hope.ac.uk

Department: English