International Relations Study Liverpool Hope University,Study,Undergraduate,Undergraduate Courses

International Relations

Duration: 3 years

Overview

Hear from a tutor and student about studying International Relations at Liverpool Hope.

 
Every day, international issues are in the news headlines – this is your chance to become an expert on relations between states, economies, ideas and societies. You can take part in our extensive programme of visiting speakers, fieldtrips, overseas exchanges and other activities.

In conjunction with your course in International Relations you can take a second subject area, and this gives an added dimension to the way in which you can shape your studies and gives you different and unique perspectives on how the international community works and operates.

International Relations is a multi-disciplinary subject, which draws in contributions from politics, history, media, sociology, law, economics and religion. Global issues dominate the news headlines on a daily basis and International Studies will allow you to focus on this dimension of Politics. This is an opportunity to become an expert in international issues in a historical, political and cultural context.

Why choose this subject?

  • There are internationally focused study trips and opportunities for international exchanges, including to Berlin and Brussels
  • The degree has a strong programme of visiting speakers and a close working relationship with the History-Politics Student Society
  • You will study a diverse and exciting curriculum, which encourages debate and discussion
  • There are opportunities to study overseas both to Europe through the Erasmus programme and to a number of partner institutions in the USA.
  • We also have a strong programme of visiting speakers, and work closely with the History-Politics Student Society. Our aim is to encourage debate and discussion about the world today, and that is best achieved by aiming for a diverse and exciting curriculum.
  • 58% of the research of the Department is internationally recognised or internationally excellent with 70% of the impact of their research graded as internationally recognised.

Subject Guides

Read more about studying International Relations at Liverpool Hope in our International Relations Subject Guides.

International Relations Subject Guide 2017 

This degree is available as a full time course for all international students. For more information about International students studying at Liverpool Hope, visit www.hope.ac.uk/international

Curriculum

Level C (Year One)

You will take a lecture series entitled ‘The Foundations of International Relations’. This will comprise three lectures per week, each lasting one hour, and will introduce you to the discipline and its most influential, structural theories. To reinforce your learning in the lectures you will take two seminars. The first of these, ‘Key concepts in the study of International Relations’ will better prepare you to deal with the theories that characterise the discipline whereas the ‘International Relations Weekly Briefing’ will give you the opportunity, in seminars, to explore and debate ‘real world’ developments. In addition you will participate in a weekly small group tutorial.

Assessment methods include essays, exams and tutorial workbooks.

Level I (Year Two)

The second year programme is based around two components. First of all, there is a lecture series on “Understanding International Relations”, which builds and expands on the theoretical ideas you will have studied in first year and which goes on to examine a range of key issues and problems. These are discussed from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The practical side of the programme is focused particularly on the challenges and structures of foreign policy, and there is a supporting seminar series focused on foreign policy. This looks at theoretical approaches to foreign policy analysis, and then develops a series of in-depth case study evaluations. These may include analyses of the foreign policies of particular countries, such as the UK or the United States, and of the foreign policy behaviour of international organisations, such as the European Union. The small group tutorials will continue to reinforce your learning.

Assessment methods include essays, exams and extended projects.

Level H (Year Three)

As you would expect in your final year the pace steps up a gear and so too the complexity of the ideas and arguments you encounter. The lecture series, ‘Critiquing theories, unsettling assumptions: re-visiting knowledge and understanding in International Relations’, scrutinises and deconstructs that which was encountered in the first two years to leave you with a very nuanced, critical understanding of International Relations theory and ‘real world’ dynamics. You also specialise through seminars in ‘Security, Peace and Conflict' and ‘Economic crisis and political conflict’. Your tutorials will focus on supporting you through independent research with the focus of this work agreed between you and your supervising academic tutor.

Assessment methods include a research project, a two hour exam and essay coursework.

You may also be interested in...

History

Law

Politics

Politics and International Relations

World Religions

Entry Requirements

2017 Entry Requirements

The offer level for 2017 entry will be BCC - ABB at A Level or DMM - DDM at BTEC Extended Diploma or 104 - 128 new UCAS tariff points.

UCAS points offers can be achieved in many ways, the following are just a few examples of how you could achieve our entry requirements:

  • Three A Levels with grades of BCC or above
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF) with grade DMM
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF) with grade M
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and A Level with grade of C
  • CACHE Diploma at grade B

The Access to HE Diploma now also attracts points under the new UCAS tariff. Visit the UCAS website to calculate your points.

 

Useful Links

How to apply

Admissions Policy

UCAS

Employability

A degree in International Relations helps you to prepare for a wide range of careers. In any job that has an international dimension, an International Relations degree is of use. You will have the skills to work in international politics (with the UN or the EU), or international law (with international human rights groups like Amnesty), or indeed with any company that is involved in trading (travel companies, banks, international corporations etc).

Many students also move on to postgraduate degrees. In conjunction with your course in International Relations you’d take a second subject area, and this gives an added dimension to the way in which you can shape your studies and give you different and unique perspectives on how the international community works and operates. In a competitive employment market Hope’s International Relations course allows you to tailor your studies to address contemporary demand.

Overview

Hear from a tutor and student about studying International Relations at Liverpool Hope.

 
Every day, international issues are in the news headlines – this is your chance to become an expert on relations between states, economies, ideas and societies. You can take part in our extensive programme of visiting speakers, fieldtrips, overseas exchanges and other activities.

In conjunction with your course in International Relations you can take a second subject area, and this gives an added dimension to the way in which you can shape your studies and gives you different and unique perspectives on how the international community works and operates.

International Relations is a multi-disciplinary subject, which draws in contributions from politics, history, media, sociology, law, economics and religion. Global issues dominate the news headlines on a daily basis and International Studies will allow you to focus on this dimension of Politics. This is an opportunity to become an expert in international issues in a historical, political and cultural context.

Why choose this subject?

  • There are internationally focused study trips and opportunities for international exchanges, including to Berlin and Brussels
  • The degree has a strong programme of visiting speakers and a close working relationship with the History-Politics Student Society
  • You will study a diverse and exciting curriculum, which encourages debate and discussion
  • There are opportunities to study overseas both to Europe through the Erasmus programme and to a number of partner institutions in the USA.
  • We also have a strong programme of visiting speakers, and work closely with the History-Politics Student Society. Our aim is to encourage debate and discussion about the world today, and that is best achieved by aiming for a diverse and exciting curriculum.
  • 58% of the research of the Department is internationally recognised or internationally excellent with 70% of the impact of their research graded as internationally recognised.

Subject Guides

Read more about studying International Relations at Liverpool Hope in our International Relations Subject Guides.

International Relations Subject Guide 2017 

This degree is available as a full time course for all international students. For more information about International students studying at Liverpool Hope, visit www.hope.ac.uk/international

Curriculum

Level C (Year One)

You will take a lecture series entitled ‘The Foundations of International Relations’. This will comprise three lectures per week, each lasting one hour, and will introduce you to the discipline and its most influential, structural theories. To reinforce your learning in the lectures you will take two seminars. The first of these, ‘Key concepts in the study of International Relations’ will better prepare you to deal with the theories that characterise the discipline whereas the ‘International Relations Weekly Briefing’ will give you the opportunity, in seminars, to explore and debate ‘real world’ developments. In addition you will participate in a weekly small group tutorial.

Assessment methods include essays, exams and tutorial workbooks.

Level I (Year Two)

The second year programme is based around two components. First of all, there is a lecture series on “Understanding International Relations”, which builds and expands on the theoretical ideas you will have studied in first year and which goes on to examine a range of key issues and problems. These are discussed from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The practical side of the programme is focused particularly on the challenges and structures of foreign policy, and there is a supporting seminar series focused on foreign policy. This looks at theoretical approaches to foreign policy analysis, and then develops a series of in-depth case study evaluations. These may include analyses of the foreign policies of particular countries, such as the UK or the United States, and of the foreign policy behaviour of international organisations, such as the European Union. The small group tutorials will continue to reinforce your learning.

Assessment methods include essays, exams and extended projects.

Level H (Year Three)

As you would expect in your final year the pace steps up a gear and so too the complexity of the ideas and arguments you encounter. The lecture series, ‘Critiquing theories, unsettling assumptions: re-visiting knowledge and understanding in International Relations’, scrutinises and deconstructs that which was encountered in the first two years to leave you with a very nuanced, critical understanding of International Relations theory and ‘real world’ dynamics. You also specialise through seminars in ‘Security, Peace and Conflict' and ‘Economic crisis and political conflict’. Your tutorials will focus on supporting you through independent research with the focus of this work agreed between you and your supervising academic tutor.

Assessment methods include a research project, a two hour exam and essay coursework.

You may also be interested in...

History

Law

Politics

Politics and International Relations

World Religions

Entry Requirements

2017 Entry Requirements

The offer level for 2017 entry will be BCC - ABB at A Level or DMM - DDM at BTEC Extended Diploma or 104 - 128 new UCAS tariff points.

UCAS points offers can be achieved in many ways, the following are just a few examples of how you could achieve our entry requirements:

  • Three A Levels with grades of BCC or above
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF) with grade DMM
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF) with grade M
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and A Level with grade of C
  • CACHE Diploma at grade B

The Access to HE Diploma now also attracts points under the new UCAS tariff. Visit the UCAS website to calculate your points.

 

Useful Links

How to apply

Admissions Policy

UCAS

Course Combinations

Employability

A degree in International Relations helps you to prepare for a wide range of careers. In any job that has an international dimension, an International Relations degree is of use. You will have the skills to work in international politics (with the UN or the EU), or international law (with international human rights groups like Amnesty), or indeed with any company that is involved in trading (travel companies, banks, international corporations etc).

Many students also move on to postgraduate degrees. In conjunction with your course in International Relations you’d take a second subject area, and this gives an added dimension to the way in which you can shape your studies and give you different and unique perspectives on how the international community works and operates. In a competitive employment market Hope’s International Relations course allows you to tailor your studies to address contemporary demand.

Course Contact Details

Student Recruitment

+44 (0) 151 291 3111

enquiry@hope.ac.uk

Department: History and Politics

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