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BRITISH LIFE - COMPULSORY COURSE
STUDY LEVEL:
CREDITS: 15
CODE: BRLC001

Through an interdisciplinary framework, the British Life course offers visiting students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the United Kingdom and British culture(s). The terms ‘UK and’ ‘Britain,’ and the concept ‘Britishness’ are too often taken for granted. For many outsides (and inside) the British Isles, generic images are conjured in association with these infamous labels. However, these terms and concepts are as complex and ambiguous as the multitude of historical, political, and cultural factors that brought them into existence, and worldwide parlance.

During this course, students will carefully unpack these terms and concepts and will be introduced to the kaleidoscope of factors that give them their meanings. By the end of the course, they will have a deeper understanding and appreciation of what it means to be British and what constitutes modern Britain. This course will provide them with essential knowledge, understandings and skills that will assist them in their personal and/or professional interactions British people and British institutions today and into the future.

Week 1: The United Kingdom: origins and transformations (1707 - 1922)
Week2: Unpacking Britishness: languages, dialects, cultures, and stereotypes
Week 3: Religion and Faith in Modern Britain
Week 4: UK Democracy: A Staple of British ‘Eccentricity’
Week 5: The British Class System in Drama and Film
Week 6: British values and Change in Literature 20th and 21st centuries
Week 7: Britain, Pop Music, and Social Change
Wek 8: British Subcultures and Socio-political progress: the 80s, 90s and 2000s

Learning outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the University context in which they are studying.
2. Show an awareness of the academic expectations of them by tutors at Liverpool Hope University.
3. Reflect on their own educational experiences in the UK and at home.
4. Demonstrate a knowledge of key elements of British life
5. Demonstrate an interest in UK and Liverpool culture


Group Presentation - likely to be the planning, production and presentation of a poster, to be displayed 'Conference style' in a public place and open to the academic community at Hope. The content will require research and an in-depth exploration of a unique aspect of British life not commonly known outside UK. The title will be advised mid-course.

BUSINESS SCHOOL
STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ACFC006

In these classes you will develop an understanding of the key financial systems in a business.

The aims of this course are:
-Understand how accountants function in a business environment.
-Understand what accounting is and users of accounts.

Course Learning Outcomes:
-To understand the different accounting functions
-To understand what is accounting and bookkeeping and
-To understand and identify key stakeholders in accounting information.

Assessment for this course is one 800 word short essay worth 100%.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARC002

Students will be introduced to the underlying principles of the marketing field. Fundamental to an understanding of marketing is a clear understanding of the relationship between marketing and the global markets. As the global markets change and the wants and needs change with these markets, marketers need to be able to contextualise marketing theory and practice within a broad timeframe that encompasses past, present and future. In order to achieve this, the course focuses on the role of marketing in relation to customers, consumers and the micro and macro environments.

Structure of the course: 2 x 1 hour lectures, 1 x 2 hour seminar.

Assessment for this course is a written report related to introducing a new product/good/service to a specific target market, worth 100% of your final grade.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARH009

In these classes students will work with data sets and employ a broad range of qualitative and quantitative methods to analyse and make sense of complex information and to provide evidence–based marketing recommendations. Students will also engage with SPSS to learn how to conduct a range of hypothesis tests. The course aims to introduce the students to the concept of marketing research and will explore both quantitative and qualitative methods of analysis.

Course Learning Outcomes:
-Demonstrate a thorough and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Marketing theories and their application in a variety of organisations and settings.
-Problem solve and be able to demonstrate critical analysis.
-Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics of marketing
-Understand and be able to demonstrate appropriate use of statistical analysis and research methodologies.

Course Curriculum Content:
- Students will work with data sets and employ a broad range of qualitative and quantitative methods to analyse and make sense of complex information and to provide evidence–based marketing recommendations.
-Students will also engage with SPSS to learn how to conduct a range of hypothesis tests.

Assessment for this course is a Marketing Analytics Assessment (2,500 words equivalent) worth 100% of your final grade.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARI011

The course aims to introduce the students to the concept of Marketing Strategy and Planning.

Course Learning Outcomes:
-Demonstrate a thorough and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Marketing theories and their application in a variety of organisations and settings.
-Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of contemporary marketing techniques and the potential impacts on society
-Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics of marketing.
-Problem solve and be able to demonstrate critical analysis

Course Curriculum Content
-This course will demonstrate the critical importance of an organising establishing, understanding, executing and monitoring its marketing strategy.
-It will also explore the key components of a marketing plan and examine how to devise and implement a sustainable plan which contributes effectively to an organisations strategic goals and objectives.

Assessment for this course is a written 2,500 Marketing Plan worth 100%.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ACFH001

In these classes you will develop an understanding of specialist cost and management accounting techniques, performance measurement and control techniques and contemporary decision making tools available to the management accountant.

The aims of this course are:
-To gain an understanding of methodologies which utilise non-financial data to assist in measuring business performance. In particular, this will include Balanced Scorecards.
-Consideration will also be given to performance in the not-for-profit sector.

Course Learning Outcomes:
- To asses the performance of a business from a non-financial viewpoint.
- To appreciate the different factors involved in business operations.




Assessment for this course is a 1,500 word written report based on a corporate scenario. (100%)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ACFC007

This course offers an introduction to Microeconomic Principles, including the workings of supply and demand with applications to analyse government intervention (price controls and taxes), along with an analysis of various types of market structure, from perfect competition to monopoly. Students will learn practical applications for microeconomics by using real-life examples.

The aims of this course are:
-To explore;
-The forces of supply and demand;
-Elasticities
-Government policy
-Externalities
-Cost and revenue
-Public and merits goods
-Market structures: perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly and monopoly

Course Learning Outcomes:
-To apply knowledge of the determinants of supply and demand.
-To apply knowledge of price and income elasticity of demand.
-To Analyse government intervention in markets.
-To Understand and describe (compare and contrast) the various types of market structure and possible outcomes







The aims of this course are:
- The forces of supply and demand
- Elasticities
- Government policy
- Externalities
- Cost and revenue
- Public and merits goods
- Market structures: perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly and monopoly

Assessment for this course is a 1,000 word Microeconomics Report presenting and explaining the economics content of one news article dealing with a Microeconomic topic.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARI006

Social Marketing and Social Media course curriculum overview:
- Introduction to Social Media and Social Marketing
- Marketing Ethics
- Sales Concepts and Strategies
- Retail Marketing
- Relationship Marketing

Learning outcomes
At the end of the course, you will be able to:
1) Critically evaluate how social media can be utilised by marketers both from a theoretical and practical perspective.
2) Critically examine how technological advancements are shaping the use of social media amongst customers.
3) Critically analyse theories, models and frameworks of behavioural change.
4) Critically evaluate how social marketing can bring about behaviour change.

Curriculum content:

1st Week Social Publishing
2nd Week Social Community
3rd Week Social Entertainment
4th Week Social Commerce
5th Week The Horizontal Revolution
6th Week Behavioural Objectives and Barriers
7th Week Developing a plan for monitoring and evaluation
8th Week Creating an implementation Plan


Assessment for this course is a Social Media / Marketing Project - 3,000 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ACFC004

This course offers an introduction to Statistics, by studying charts and graphs, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability theory, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, and sampling techniques.

The aims of this course:
-To provide a solid foundation of statistical knowledge and its various applications.

Course Learning Outcomes:
- To develop knowledge and understanding of fundamentals and basic tools of statistical analysis, in both theory and application.

Assessment for this course is a 1 hour in-class test worth 100% of your final grade.

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: GEOC007

This course will explore the formation and structure of the Earth, the dynamic geological processes that control the evolution of the Earth, and the Geological Structures and landscapes that form the Earth's surface.

The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to investigate the formation and structure of the Earth; the dynamic geological processes that control the evolution of the Earth; and, geological structures and landscapes that form the Earth's surface.

Learning outcomes:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the formation and geological evolution of and dynamic geological processes that influence the Earth
2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of selected geological structures and features that contribute to the geological landforms and landscapes that form the surface of the Earth


Essay - 2,000 words for 100% of the marks. Typical title ' Outline and Discuss how the theory of platetectonics revolutionized the way Erath/environmental scientists looked at the Earth's dynamic processes'

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EVSC001

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures and workshops/laboratory practicals. The lectures will provide the necessary background information that is required to undertake the practical investigation of the geological materials within the workshops/laboratory practicals. The lectures will outline the major rock-forming mineral groups and minerals before considering the interrelationships between the internal and external processes of the Earth (including the role of plate tectonics) that give rise to the three major rock groups. Each rock group will be explored in turn in relation to their formation processes, locations, key features/characteristics and classifications of individual rock types.

The practicals are designed around the acquisition and development of the skills and techniques required to be able to classify rocks according to the three major groups of rock (igneous, metamorphic or sedimentary). This will include the ability to determine their mode of formation (process or product); where they are typically located or occur (setting or environment); and, identify individual rocks types based on their mineral composition and other diagnostic features (texture etc.).

A short field visit is proposed to the World Museum in Liverpool city centre to investigate their geological collections (minerals, rocks and fossils).
The assessment will comprise two components: a written assignment and a practical class test. The written assignment (essay) will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in the formation of the geological materials; and, the practical test will assess the ability to identify a selection of rocks based on the interpretation of the key diagnostic features of the individual rocks.

Assessment
50% Essay (2,000 words)
50% Practical class test (1.5 hours)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: GEOI021

Course Available both FALL and SPRING

Curriculum content: This course considers selected processes that shape and modify the surface of the Earth, for example, weathering, mass movement. Students will explore and evaluate the diversity of geomorphological and/or biogeographical processes in operation on the Earth particularly with regard to their controlling factors, role in temporal and spatial patterns, and, landform/landscape development (including soil formation). This course may also include non-residential fieldwork.

Course aims: This course aims to develop students knowledge, understanding and interpretation of selected Earth surface processes (geomorphological and biogeographical processes) and their role in landform and landscape development.

Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to evidence an increased knowledge and critical understanding of the processes that shape and modify the surface of the Earth.

Assessment
Coursework- Essay - 2,000 words for 50% of the marks
Coursework - Case study - 2,000 words for 50% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EVSC003

The course begins with developing your understanding of the physical properties that drove the climatic transition into the Holocene (our current ‘warm’ epoch). It then goes onto explore climatic fluctuations during the Holocene and how this stability helped to develop human society including the agricultural and industrial revolutions. The course then looks at anthropogenic (human) impact on environmental change and questions whether or not we have moved into the Anthropocene. The course is centred around changes in the Earth’s system: Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, Cryosphere, Lithosphere and Biosphere.

The course aims to provide an understanding of climate and environmental change during the Holocene time period (11,700 – present day) through identifying the climatic and anthropogenic drivers of environmental change.
The Environmental Change course aims to provide students with the opportunity to:
• experience a curriculum that encourages an interdisciplinary approach to investigate, understand and manage human interactions with the environment
• evaluate key concepts, debates, and develop a critical understanding of environmental change
• develop an informed concern for the environment, particularly regarding anthropogenic environmental change
• undertake an independent environmental science report to develop a critical understanding of the subject area

By the end of the course students should be able to:
• evidence knowledge of Holocene environmental change
• demonstrate a critical understanding of climatic and anthropogenic environmental change
• demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, and to reflect on their learning experience

Teaching is one Lecture per week on Monday 3-4pm

Environmental Change Report - 1,500 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EVSH001

This module will explore Global Environmental Change within the Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic eons. You will develop an understanding of the mechanisms giving rise to, and effects of, the Earth’s three main climate states within these eons – ‘snowball’, ‘icehouse’ and ‘greenhouse’.
N.B. This course will require prior knowledge / experience of the subject. Contact course provider for further information.

Course aims
This course aims to explore the nature of Global Environmental Change throughout Earth history through an evaluation of the climate states and their impacts within the Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic eons.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course, students should be able to:
1. Explain the nature of the Earth’s three main climate states within the Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic eons – ‘snowball’, ‘icehouse’ and ‘greenhouse’.
2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms giving rise to ‘snowball’, ‘icehouse’ and ‘greenhouse’ climate states.
3. Critically evaluate the effects and impacts of ‘snowball’, ‘icehouse’ and ‘greenhouse’ climate states throughout Earth history.

Essay 2,000 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: TORI005

Course aim:
To provide a detailed understanding of domestic and international tourism destinations, including an informed understanding of the different forms of new and alternative tourism

Course outcome:
To provide an informed understanding of the changing nature of tourism and tourists, and the rise of alternative forms of tourism.
To provide a detailed and informed understanding and appreciation of tourism within its wider social, economic and political context.

Curriculum content:
The course will examine the increasing move by tourists towards seeking experiential and nice tourism products.

Assessment detail:
Essay - 2000 words - 100%

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: TORI003

Course Available both FALL and SPRING.

FALL: (Synopsis pending)
SPRING: This course will examine the increasing move by tourists towards seeking experimental and niche tourism products.

Course aims: To provide a detailed understanding of domestic and international tourism destinations, including an informed understanding of the different forms of new and alternative tourism.

Course learning outcomes:
To provide an informed understanding of the changing nature of tourism and tourists, and the rise in alternate forms of tourism.
To provide a detailed and informed understanding and appreciation of tourism within its wider social, economic and political context.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EVSH002

Awaiting description - we will update this site when we have further information

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYH051

The content includes; why communication matters, the basic skills of communication (birth to Early Years), child directed speech, shared reading, home learning environment, bilingualism, investigating child language errors, immersive experience measuring psychometric performance, developmental disorders, development of complex narratives, the roles of peers in communication interaction. Please note that if students complete the course in December not all areas will be covered.

Assessment
Essay -1,000 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYI045

This intense 8-week course provides an authoritative introduction to the field of health promotion, with a specific focus on proactive approaches in the normal population. Professor Cousins presents a series of teaching sessions that provide a critical overview of the field, its theories and applications. The programme includes contemporary examples, including her own research on managing work-related stress. Whilst Health Promotion is a ‘stand-alone’ course, it is strongly recommended that students should have taken an ‘Introductory Psychology’ course.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYC009

Psychology and Ethics
Course Aims:
Aim 1 - To provide students with a deeper understanding of scientific and philosophical underpinnings of Psychology.
Aim 2 – To gain a broader insight into the social, economic and ethical impact of psychological research and its applications.

Week Lecture 1 Lecture 2
1 Overview of course What are ethics? How are they different from morals
2 Moral development 1 Moral development 2
3 Moral perspectives 1 Moral perspectives 2
4 Free Will Determinism
5 Rights Dignity
6 Ethical Principles: Researcher Ethical Principles: Practitioner
7 Risk 1 Risk 2
8 Consent Debrief

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYC010

This course aims to provide an understanding of what psychology is and how it fits within a scientific framework thus enabling us to help students transition between their preconceptions of the subject and the reality of psychology as a discipline. A central part of this is to consider how psychology fits within the scientific method and the problems associated with this. The course also considers the history of psychology. Subsequently, the first part of the course aims to address the question ‘Is psychology a science?’ and if so, can we see evidence of this through the history of psychology. The second part of the course aims to encourage students to consider the issues related to the scientific study of psychology and the challenges associated with such an approach.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYH052

At the intersection of Science and Art, the course in Psychology of Aesthetics and the Arts proposes a journey across theories and empirical work on the psychological processes involved in the aesthetic experience of visual art and design, music and dance, natural and urban settings. The course is organized in themes addressing the role of objects, contexts, states and individual differences on aesthetic experience. This will be accompanied by a series of short experimental demonstrations in which the students will take part. This course is an opportunity to reflect on the relevance of the psychological function of aesthetic appreciation for the individual and the society

Course topics include:
- Course Introduction. Science and Art
- Empirical aesthetics: theories and methods
- Visual preference for object properties
- Aesthetics, architecture and design
- Aesthetics and natural environments
- Aesthetics in the real context
- Embodiment in aesthetic experience
- Art and Eye movements

Assessment

100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYH046

This course aims to provide students with:
- A critical awareness of the application of psychological theories to the area of religion
- A developed understanding of the successes and limitations of the applications of these theories
- A greater sophistication in their skills of locating, reading, critically interpreting and analytically reviewing reports of psychological research into religion
- Developed and enhanced oral and written communication skills.

By the end of the course, students will be able to:
- Appraise the relevance and appropriateness of psychological theories and their application to religion.
- Effectively present oral and written evidence of a critical awareness and evaluation of psychological theories and their application to religion.
- Critically apply psychological theories and concepts to the area of religion.

The course will offer a critical scientific approach to the study of the psychology of religion, including the origins of religious belief, religious dimensions and orientations, the relationship between religion and physical and mental well-being, religion as a mechanism for coping with stress and trauma, and the relationship between religion and political violence / terrorism. Students will consider the application of a variety of psychological theories to the area of religion.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

SCHOOL OF CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ARTH016

Course Available FALL and SPRING

This is a studio-based course, which seeks to encourage you to actively engage in research that will form a continuum of your previously made work and research interests. The study of contemporary and art historical practices within Fine Art will be expected to underpin all students work. You should arrive on the course equipped with images of your previous work and documentation outlining your research interests. The work produced on the course will be guided by regular support and guidance in one-to-one tutorials from studio lecturers. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists. Workshops are available in wood, metal, print, digital media and plaster. These facilities are available to you following a short technical induction. Group critiques with your peers and tutors alongside indicative and self-assessments will support you in developing a personal visual language in full knowledge of the Fine Art field of cultural production. You will keep a contextual journal, which should position your studio practice from an informed and knowledgeable perspective. This document will also evidence your knowledge of the wider Fine Art and cultural perspective. It is a requirement of the course that you actively engage with the vibrant exhibition programmes at Walker Art Gallery, The Bluecoat, FACT and other major art Institutions based in Liverpool. The early stages of your study and practice will be in an experimental format, which will enable you to test out ideas in a studio-based setting. The latter stages of production will realise you working in a more focussed mode towards a resolved body of work. The opportunity to discuss ideas and research with your peers and tutors is available during studio time and in various group critique sessions. The praxis of theoretical research and practical work will test your creativity through a wide range of media and methods before your final Level H Advanced Fine Art submission.

Contextual and Personal Journals and Sketchbooks- The supporting contextual and personal journals with documentation of your engagement with national and international contemporary art are an important part of the course. The journals should include critical reflection regarding at least three of the major museums and galleries based in Liverpool. This journal should outline and critically reflect upon all exhibitions visited and book based or academic journal research. The contextual journal can contain photographs and reproductions of the work of other artists with published text references combined with your own critical and analytical commentary.

The personal journal should contain a record of your methodologies employed within the studio practice as well as links to artists that have informed your practice. The artists documented can be from a contemporary or art historical setting and your written commentary should contain written reflections upon your studio processes and thinking, alongside visual documentation of your work in progress. There is a requirement to critically evaluate the work of related artists and the research should act as a place to reflect and think critically, not as a diary. Sketchbooks will document your initial ideas, musings and general practice.

Assessments
50% Coursework; Advanced Visual Research and Development.
50% Contextual and Personal journals containing visual imagery and written analysis of work from primary and secondary sources.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ARTH017

Course Available FALL and SPRING

This is a studio-based course, which seeks to encourage you to actively engage in research that will form a continuum of your previously made work and research interests. The study of contemporary and art historical practices within Fine Art will be expected to underpin all of the work made within studios. You should arrive on the course equipped with images of your previous work and documentation outlining your research interests. The work produced on the course will be guided by regular support and guidance in one-to-one tutorials from studio lecturers.
All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists. Workshops are available in wood, metal, print, digital media and plaster. These facilities are available to you following a short technical induction. Group critiques with your peers and tutors alongside indicative and self-assessments will support you in developing a personal visual language in full knowledge of the Fine Art field of cultural production.

You will keep a contextual journal, which should position your studio practice from an informed and knowledgeable perspective. This document will also evidence your knowledge of the wider Fine Art and cultural perspective. It is a requirement of the course that you actively engage with the vibrant exhibition programmes at Walker Art Gallery, The Bluecoat, FACT and other major art Institutions based in Liverpool. The contextual journal should include critical reflection regarding at least two of the major museums and galleries based in Liverpool. This journal will outline and critically reflect upon all exhibitions visited and book based or academic journal research. The journal can contain photographs and reproductions of the work of other artists with published text references combined with your own critical and analytical commentary. Sketchbooks will document your initial ideas, drawings, musings and notes. The early stages of your study and practice will be in an experimental format, which will enable you to test out ideas in a studio-based setting. The latter stages of production will realise you working in a more focused mode towards a resolved body of work. The opportunity to discuss ideas and research with your peers and tutors is available during studio time and in various group critique sessions. The praxis of theoretical research and practical work will test your creativity through a wide range of media and methods before your final Level H Advanced Fine Art submission.

Assessment
100% Advanced Visual Research and Development. Coursework including Contextual Journal.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: GRDH001

From Advanced Studies in Graphic Design (third and final year of degree)

This Graphic Design course is constructed to promote the formation of critically aware individuals, with a technical competence in both physical and digital modes of working, and processing a robust professional awareness. At Level H these concepts are assumed to be well-rounded and aligned to professional aspirations. A good knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite is essential.

You will use your technical and theoretical tools to problem solve in a range of professional and theoretical contexts. You will have the opportunity to master a range of technical skills and software competencies to develop your personal visual language.

This course focuses on theorising a creative trajectory. Writing a graphic design research proposal will help you understand the market and identifying effective graphic design solutions; consolidating links between your theoretical knowledge and professional practice. You will be able to demonstrate a deep and broad understanding of graphic design, with an ability to produce creative designs; working to professional parameter either in print or digital format.

Themes Include:
Working to a live brief
Building a national and international profile
Understanding clients and building professional relationships Developing and testing ideas
Physical and digital reprographics
Proofing and finalising designs
Independent enquiry and creative practice
Advanced User Experience and User Interface Design (UX/UI)

In third year, students will consolidate their robust understanding of the theoretical and practical principles of Graphic Design by enacting their knowledge in the formation of a high quality professional portfolio of work. Innovation will underpin their work throughout their final year of study and they will collaborate with staff on their research, work to live briefs and theorise their own independent approaches to study and design. The final year aims to provide students with the opportunity to create a distinct body of work and a professional skillset and attitude that will equip students with the potential to excel in a competitive and creative sector. The graphic design research block provides students with the opportunity to tailor their own particular interests aligned with their career ambitions. Students will produce written research in the form of either a dissertation or special study.

Students will be able to demonstrate:
LO1: their ability to research independently and produce a high quality graphic design project driven by a well framed conceptual idea that reflects their own individual creative identity and professional direction and the professional awareness and self-criticality to organise their finest work.

LO2: their potential to generate future employment opportunities by orienting their skill set to the professional domain by theorising, creating and presenting a selection of graphic design work to a range of external stakeholders on a number of digital and face to face platforms.

Portfolio minimum 10 portfolio sheets (75%)
Learning journal and research, 1,000 words equivalent (25%).

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ADHH009

The history of aesthetics is necessarily bound up with philosophical ideas about the nature and function of art and design, and how the past has influenced current theories of art. Given the extensive nature of this subject, the course aims to act as a catalyst to further study and thought rather than providing a comprehensive history of aesthetics. To that end, the seminars focus on the key aesthetic concepts such as beauty, taste, value, interpretation and creativity. Through intensive study of these concepts, students will be introduced to a range of writers and philosophers of art, design and wider culture, spanning centuries of Western history.

Course Aims:
-Develop students’ engagement with some key concepts, themes, and debates in aesthetics.
-Develop students’ ability to give clear analyses of complex positions.
-Develop students’ critical thinking skills and ability to develop original arguments.

Learning Outcomes:
-Demonstrate a broad understanding of some important classic texts and authors in the history of the Philosophy of Art and a broad understanding of the central debates about art and artistic evaluation in contemporary philosophy.
-Demonstrate how to relate the ideas and concepts that can be found in classic texts with the ideas and debates that are currently discussed in the philosophy of art and art criticism.
-Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of philosophical ideas to everyday artistic practice and criticism.




Assessment for this course is a 1,500 word essay worth 100% of your final grade.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DMAH002

This course explores the re-performance, re-interpretation, and re-making of classical plays, such as Euripides’ Alcestis and Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale (plays may change depending on the year). The course investigates the theatrical and political potentials of scenography, fragments, voice, storytelling, casting, and adaptation. The student will then have the opportunity to work towards creating their own adaptation of a classic text. This course will test and challenge assumptions about the ‘classical’ canon, and its importance for contemporary theatre-makers.

Assessment
Performance and Viva (10 minute performance and 10 minute Viva)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DMAH003

The student will study Applied Theatre as a discipline and all the forms of practice that falls under that heading. They will acquire the skills to design, deliver and evaluate a series of bespoke workshops for a chosen constituency group. In semester one they will set up their own theatre company focusing on elements such as marketing, budgeting, ethics, workshop planning, group dynamics, etc. They will also research into the specific requirements of their chosen constituency group and formulate a practice referencing and taking influence from established models in the field. In both semesters they will learn facilitation skills, and in Semester 2 have the opportunity to run a workshop off-campus with their chosen community group (for example, schools, youth centres, nursing homes, prison, etc.)

Assessment
Workshop design and delivery, followed by a viva (45 min work-shop, 15min Viva)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: FVCH002

This study abroad course will look at Hollywood cinema of the new millennium. Through week-by-week analysis of key films, it will examine the political and industrial aspects of contemporary American cinema, including the boundaries between mainstream and independent film, the rise of multimedia convergence and transmedia, stardom, social issues (e.g. representations of race and gender), and commercial considerations (e.g. marketing and distribution).

Structure of teaching: 2 x 1 hour lectures, 1 x seminar a week.

Assessment
80% Essay on Contemporary Hollywood Cinema (4,000 words)
20% Seminar Work (1,000 words equivalent)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ADHC019

This course will provide students with a broad knowledge of a range of practices in contemporary approaches to art and design history. It is an interactive course based around interactive exploration of approaches to creative practice based on the study of contemporary examples

Learning outcomes:
-To demonstrate a basic understanding of contemporary approaches to art and design practice in relation to historical frameworks.
-To demonstrate an ability to write about art and design using relevant disciplinary language.

Curriculum Content:
-This element considers the diversity of practices and approaches in modern and contemporary visual practices, and the ways in which these are situated within a historical tradition of creative practice. The past is only ever accessed through the present; history is made by our interpretation of the traces left by those who lived before us, seen through contemporary eyes. Similarly, in negotiating the contemporary world, we consciously or unconsciously build on our understanding of what has gone before. This element takes a thematic approach to contemporary practice, with a focus on the complex and diverse relationships between past and present in art, architecture and design. It includes contributions from practitioners and historians, comprising both classroom-based lectures and seminars, interactive tasks investigations and study visits.

Assessment for this course is a 1,500 word essay worth 100% of final grade.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DANI013

Course Available FALL and SPRING

HIGH LEVEL OF ENERGY REQUIRED

FALL : This 15 credit study abroad course offers visiting students the opportunity to develop dance practices based around digital media and screen based dance. Screen-based dance locates the body and site through the frame of media based technologies, video cameras, and also immediate technologies such as mobile phones. The student will develop their understanding of choreography and composition through practical sessions delivered throughout the course and will explore issues that emerge in the interface of live and digitised dance performance, such as representation, mediatisation and the role of the audience.
Accompanying your explorations in practical dance making, a lecture series will reflect on how both current and historic makers may respond to social, political and cultural climates to adapt their individual choreographic approaches and styles.

SPRING: This 15 credit study abroad course offers visiting students will focus on dance from a postmodern context, looking at current influential choreographers across the globe whose work challenges definitions of the dancing body in today’s society. We will explore choreographers whose work fuses different techniques and cultural styles, exploring definitions of fusion and hybridity in dance to look at areas of cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural practice. You will undertake a short placement with a professional dance organisation which will be mentored by your tutors.

Assessments

FALL:
50% Group Performance (10 minutes)
50% Essay(3000 words equivalent)

SPRING:
Placement report (10minutes) 50%
Presentation (3000 words equivalent) 50%

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: FVCI003

This Study Abroad course offers a comprehensive exploration of major cinematic movements in the interwar years. We will address key moments for selected European cinemas, from post WWI silent film to sound, with a central focus on the relationship between key aesthetic innovations and the socio-political context in which films existed. Areas covered in this course will include the avant-gardes, montage theory, and realism, with case studies from German, French, and Soviet cinema

Course structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture, 1 x 90 minute seminar, and 1 x 1 hour tutorial a week.

Assessment
85% Essay on European Cinema (2,500 words)
15% Tutorial Work (500 equivalent)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ARTI024

Course Available Fall and SPRING
This course of study is initially project-led with you being encouraged and guided by tutors towards an eventual self-directed thematic choice and area of study within contemporary Fine Art. The first project is an engaging and broad-based brief, which is open to a wide scope of interpretation and is intended to serve as a starting point for the forming of a student-led thematic approach to practice. There is scope for experimentation with methods and materials in order to aid the development of a personal visual language.

You will be encouraged to establish and develop an autonomous method of inquiry and practice. Activities will include the visual research of ideas and methodologies in a choice of either painting, sculpture, print, drawing, photography, video or any other relevant media. There is a requirement to research both contemporary and historical Fine Art practice which will be documented in a contextual journal format. The contextual journal serves to record and critically reflect upon your progress and cultural experiences. This journal should also record the evaluation of gallery visits within Liverpool using the major art institutions based in Liverpool such as The Walker Art Gallery, Bluecoat, FACT and The Lady Lever Gallery.

Both the contextual research and practice-based aspects of the course are guided by regular contact time with specialist tutors of the related disciplines. A sketchbook should be produced and this forms the documentation and testing out of ideas, processes and studio development. Inductions are offered in areas such as wood, metal, print, plaster and laser cutting. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing from a life model is an optional activity for all students. You will be supported by tutors in the development of an informed practical and theoretical stance in relation to Fine Art practice. All tutors on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Assessment
50% Portfolio of developmental drawings, experimentation with materials and processes with outcomes in 2D/3D dimensions with supporting contextual 50% Supporting journals and sketchbooks, equivalent to 30 credits worth of study.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ARTI027

Course Available FALL

This course of study is initially project-led with you being encouraged and guided by tutors towards an eventual self-directed thematic choice and area of study within contemporary Fine Art. The first project is an engaging and broad-based brief, which is open to a wide scope of interpretation and is intended to serve as a starting point for the forming of a student-led thematic approach to practice.
There is scope for experimentation with methods and materials in order to aid the development of a personal visual language. You will be encouraged to establish and develop an autonomous method of inquiry and practice. Activities will include the visual research of ideas and methodologies in a choice of either painting, sculpture, print, drawing, photography, video or any other relevant media.
There is a requirement to research both contemporary and historical Fine Art practice which will be documented in a contextual journal format. The contextual journal serves to record and critically reflect upon your progress and cultural experiences. This journal should also record the evaluation of gallery visits within Liverpool using the major art institutions based in Liverpool such as The Walker Art Gallery, Bluecoat, FACT and The Lady Lever Gallery.

Both the contextual research and practice-based aspects of the course are guided by regular contact time with specialist tutors of the related disciplines. A sketchbook should be produced and this forms the documentation and testing out of ideas, processes and studio development. Inductions are offered in areas such as wood, metal, print, plaster and laser cutting. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing sessions which look at differing approaches to drawing are offered to study abroad students.
You will be supported by tutors in the development of an informed practical and theoretical stance in relation to Fine Art practice. All tutors on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Course structure: delivery is via 1 x 3 hour studio session and 1 x 1 hour small group tutorial.

Assessment
100% Coursework: A portfolio of developmental drawings, experimentation with materials and processes with outcomes in 2D/3D dimensions, supported by a contextual journal

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: GRDI001

Our Graphic Design courses are constructed to promote the formation of critically aware individuals, with a technical competence in both physical and digital modes of working, and processing a robust professional awareness. At Level I these concepts are assumed to be partially developed. A good knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite is essential. You will use your technical and theoretical tools to problem solve in a range of contexts. You will have the opportunity to develop a range of technical skills and software competencies.
This course focuses on core principles of typography and applied digital production methods. Research and writing will help provide you with a lens on aesthetics or visual culture; making links between your theoretical knowledge and professional practice.You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the digital graphic design process and related software in response to a focussed brief either in print or digital format.
Themes Include:
Applied Software (Adobe Creative Suite)
Applied typography – ideas and techniques
Physical and digital reprographics
Independent enquiry and creative practice
User Experience and User Interface Design (UX/UI)

Course aims
In Level I, students will use the technical and theoretical tools they have acquired to begin to problem solve through design thinking in a range of contexts. They will be provided with the opportunity to master a range of new technical skills and software competencies that will enable them to understand, apply and develop their own visual language. Students will focus on core principles of typography and critical writing in their discipline, with the potential to use these concepts as a lens on aesthetics or visual culture. Students will begin to apply their knowledge into real world professional contexts, making links between their theoretical knowledge and professional practice by working collaboratively and collectively

Learning outcomes
Students will be able to demonstrate:
LO1: a deeper and broader understanding of the digital design process and related software and an ability to produce creative designs to a focussed brief either in print or digital format.

LO2: design thinking and creative literacy by developing stimulating visual imagery in printed and screened word utilising a range of traditional and current typographic ideas and techniques.

LO3: a developing critical awareness of the theoretical underpinnings of Art and Design History in a contemporary, historical and global context with an increasing specialisation in Graphic Design.

Teaching - all day graphics studio session 9am to 5pm on Monday

Portfolio - minimum 10 portfolio sheets for 75% of the marks
Learning journal and research - 1,000 words equivalent for 25% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ARTC007

Course Available FALL and SPRING.

This is a project-led course. The projects draw on a choice of activities which include painting, sculpture, installation, sound and collage. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing sessions which look at differing approaches to drawing are offered to study abroad students. There is a requirement to research both contemporary and historical Fine Art practice which will be documented in a contextual journal format. This journal would also record the evaluation of study and gallery visits undertaken within Liverpool or other venues in the UK. There is scope within this course for experimentation with a range of materials and processes in order for experiential learning to contribute to the forming of a personal visual language. Both the contextual research and practice-based aspects of the course are guided by regular contact time with specialist tutors of the related disciplines. A sketchbook will be produced and this forms the documentation and testing out of ideas, processes and studio development. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Assessment
50% A portfolio of project-led drawings with evidence of material experimentation and outcomes in two and/or three dimensions
50% A Supporting contextual journal and sketchbooks containing visual imagery and written analysis of work from primary and secondary sources equivalent to 30 credits worth of study.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ARTC006

Course Available FALL and SPRING.

FALL and SPRING synopsis:
This is a studio-based and project-led course which leads you through a variety of approaches to contemporary art practice in two and three dimensions. Inductions in the use of workshop equipment allows you to explore your ideas in a variety of media within the disciplines of painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Activities will include the visual research of ideas and methodologies in a choice of either painting, sculpture, print, drawing, photography, video or any other relevant media. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing sessions which look at differing approaches to drawing are offered to study abroad students. Contextual research and regular gallery visits to venues in Liverpool provide a broader level of understanding of the subject. The cultural venues in the city offer an exciting learning environment, particularly to international students as Liverpool has more museums and galleries than any other UK city outside of London. You are encouraged to bring examples of your previous work (in photographic form). Course delivery is a three hour studio practical session and a one hour group tutorial each week. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Course delivery is a three hour studio practical session and a one hour group tutorial each week. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Assessment
100% Coursework -A portfolio of drawings and related experiments in 2D and 3D (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: GRDC001

Our Graphic Design courses are constructed to promote the formation of critically aware individuals, with a technical competence in both physical and digital modes of working, and processing a robust professional awareness.
Covering the foundational principles of graphic design you will explore the fundamental relationship between word, image, colour, layout and composition. Through the application of digital graphic design skills and knowledge in a range of practical tasks, you will be asked to respond to briefs utilising a clear understanding of a range of approaches to Graphic Design.

Themes Include:
- Graphic design in the physical and digital domains
- The relationship of word and image
- The rules of colour
- Layout, and Composition
- Exploration Of Adobe Creative Cloud, including, Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign

Course aims
In Level C, students will be introduced to the foundational principles of graphic design where they will explore the fundamental relationship between word, image, colour, layout and composition. Using this understanding they will begin to engage with Graphic Design as a creative field at the interface of digital and physical modes of working. They will do this synergistically with a developing theoretical knowledge of Art and Design History from Antiquity to the 21st Century. From the outset the course aims to inculcate students with collaborative modes of working, emulating the creative communicative community of Graphic Design in the real world.

Learning outcomes
Students will be able to demonstrate:
LO1:a well-rounded understanding of the fundamental principles of graphic design through the application of specific digital graphic design skills and knowledge in a range of practical tasks.

LO2:their understanding of the fundamental processes of graphic design by developing their ideas, adequately evaluating their work and realising their designs for screen and print using a range of digital and physical tools.

LO3: an experimental and conceptual awareness by responding to project briefs, utilising a clear understanding of a range of theoretical and technical approaches to Graphic Design to create a body of work that represents their developing design knowledge and awareness.

Teaching - all day Graphics studio session 9am - 5pm on Tuesday

Portfolio minimum 10 portfolio sheets for 75% of the marks
plus
A learning journal and research, 1,000 words equivalent for 25% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MUSI038

Course Available for FALL and SPRING

Students will study compositional devices in their choice of genre and style. They will be guided to develop their work through the use of extended structures, using given examples to explore new ways to approach the creation of musical forms. Classes will focus on a blend of guided tutor input and individual feedback on the work produced. Students will be able to explore a variety of technology- based approaches using the ‘state of the art’
equipment in the music area.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Two or three original and linked compositions of approximately 15 minutes in duration for 6-8 instruments.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MUSI039

This course focuses on the performance of vocal and instrumental solo and/or ensemble music in any genre or style. The practical seminars give students the opportunity to form their own ensembles or work with an accompanist, select a programme and experience all the challenges of making music together with other people to professional standards. Students will develop the following skills: physical dexterity and control, powers of interpretation, artistic and expressive skills, presentation skills and the ability to select a programme of music suitable to the performance context, displaying stylistic awareness and versatility as appropriate. Students will also develop feedback skills essential to performers and teachers.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the course students should be able to:
L1 – develop performative skills on a chosen instrument or voice to an advanced level, demonstrating an ability to perform works at an appropriately complex technical level.
L2 – demonstrate the ability to evaluate and give feedback on the performance of others.
L3 – plan and deliver a performance programme in a solo or ensemble context (or combination of both).

Assessment:
Performance - 15 minutes 100%

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MUSI040

Students will be guided in the use of a variety of music production equipment.
Students will be guided in the management of producing live and audio sound in a variety of
contexts.
Students will be guided in the production of specific musical projects working closely with
performers and/or technology based provision.

Learning Outcomes:
Students will:
• Demonstrate an ability to use production skills in the generation of their chosen musical projects
• Demonstrate the use of production techniques to confidently manage live and studio sound
• Demonstrate the ability to manage a project and see it through to completion, working confidently with performers and/or technology

Coursework: Two practical, production projects incorporating live and studio sound of approximately 15 minutes duration.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ADHC012

Course Available both FALL and SPRING.
This course will be the first part of our thematic overview, starting in Antiquity and moving up to Renaissance Art at
the end of the 15th century.

Course aims:
1) An introduction to the history of art and design
2) The necessary critical skills of reading, interpretation and writing for art and design history
3) An understanding of the role played by place and location, in the production of art and design
4) An understanding of art and design as social production, related to social and historical contexts

The course structure will consists of two lectures and one seminar per week.
For more information, please contact the course tutor on wagnerk@hope.ac.uk

Assessment for this course is a 1,500 word essay worth 100% of your final grade.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DMAI002

Course Available FALL and SPRING

This course invites learners to explore some of the major theories that inform the study and practice of theatre and performance, through focused discussion of a series of key topics in contemporary arts and society. These may (indicatively) include disability, ecology, race, family, gender and feminism identity - and more.

Course structure is a mix of lectures, seminar and tutorials.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: EDAH004

Final year students continue to develop their understanding of all of the discipline of Education through lecture series focused on each discipline. The particular interests and expertise of students are personalised through the seminars, in which students can explore two of the four Discipline in more depth (details in additional information)

Assessments
100% Coursework ( 2x Essay 2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EACH003

Students will explore social, historical, cultural and global development of attitudes, policies, legislation and practices in the field of early childhood. There is a particular focus on how the evolution of social policy in the UK. The interdisciplinary nature of work with children and their families is central to study. Students have an opportunity to select an area of social policy of their choice.

Key topics may include: poverty, historical and political development of constructs of childhood, historical and social development of policy and legislation, global contexts for the child and family, interdisciplinary workforce.ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
Fitzgerald, D. and Kay, J. (2016) Implementing Early Years Policy In Understanding Early years Policy. London: Sage
Waller T and Davis, G (2014). An Introduction to Early Childhood. London: Sage

Assessment
2,000 words Exploratory essay for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EACI012

Students will go through learning theories that explain how young children learn effectively. Theorists from constructivism, social constructivism and behaviourism are explored and students will use their developing knowledge to make connections between, culture and learning, barriers to learning, aspects of learning and development. Critical awareness of policy guidelines and practice in the UK and internationally are applied.

Key topics include: classical and contemporary learning theories; personal characteristics and socio-cultural influences on learning; national and international provision.

Delivery Pattern- Lectures, Seminars and Tutorials

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage

Assessment
100% E-Portfolio

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAI014

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAC013

In this block we consider the many ways that children and adults are educated outside of schools, such as through the newspapers, film, TV, exhibitions, and the family. We consider how rituals such as Balinese cock fighting are passed from one generation to the next, how influential the BBC is in the UK and has been in the past, and how film offers the opportunity for marginalised voices to be heard, but can also perpetuate racial, gender, and class stereotypes. On a field trip to the International Slavery Museum, we consider how well the exhibition educates about race and the educational opportunities that the exhibition affords that a classroom does not.

We also look at how cultural and social factors external to the school affect educational performance within it. The types of cultural factors we consider include the persistence of stereotypes of different social groups in the media, particularly in the British tabloid, The Sun. We also look at race-relations in Liverpool and East London, and how this has affected the educational experiences of British African Caribbeans. We draw comparisons with race-relations in America, showing how stereotypes of blackness, concocted by American whites to entrench white power in the past, continue to affect African-American educational experiences today.

Assessment
100% Coursework (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: EACI014

This course closely examines the impacts and influences on a young child's physical, emotional and mental health and wellbeing. From conception to 8 years, students will consider personal, societal, environmental factors that shape children’s wellbeing and have opportunities to investigative factors and consequences on the young baby’s, child's and family’s quality of life.

Delivery Pattern- Lectures, Seminars and Tutorials

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
Fitzgerald, D. and Kay, J. (2016) Implementing Early Years Policy In Understanding Early years Policy. London: Sage
Waller T and Davis, G (2014). An Introduction to Early Childhood. London: Sage


Assessment
50% Annotated Bibliography (2,000 words)
50% Critical Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAI016

Explorations into the History of Education explores the key ideas and concepts of history of education, both internationally and in particular national contexts. You will undertake an in depth exploration of the history and development of the key levels and types of education in Britain, focusing on the development of state education in Britain from 1870-1945. You will examine the history of higher education and universities, primary and secondary education, adult, technical and popular education. In addition, you will be introduced to a detailed, source based treatment of important themes in the social and cultural history of education including the shifting constructions of gender, ‘race’, class and childhood within an educational context.

The course offers you the opportunity to study the individual, social and political forces that shape education, no matter where it is found or how it is delivered. This is an exciting and eclectic course that will increase your understanding of what education is and has been, and where education may go in the future. After studying with us you may never see the education process in the same way again. We aim to foster a love of learning for its own sake, and a desire to develop your potential as a future educator. We will help you develop a critical perspective on the fundamental questions concerning the aims and values of education and its relationship to societies in the UK and overseas.
Number of contact hours: 4hrs.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAI017

This course explores education as a social institution and its relationship with social inequity and social structures in contemporary societies. The course looks at policy in Britain across all levels of education. Education policy is examined in relation to the historical, cultural, social, and political context while the dialectical relationship between economy and ideology lies at the core of the course. The aim of the course is to enable students to acquire a deep awareness of the social factors shaping education policy so as to be able to understand any future developments in education as professionals/ practitioners/ citizens.

The course offers you the opportunity to study the individual, social and political forces that shape education and is an exciting and eclectic course that will increase your understanding of what education is, has been may go in the future. We will help you develop a critical perspective on the fundamental questions concerning the aims and values of education and its relationship to societies in the UK and overseas.

Assessment
Essay (2000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: EACC010

This course supports students to explore the broad concept of childhood, both globally and nationally, from historical sociological and philosophical perspectives. What it is to be a child today is investigated and the implications of this experience are debated. This course covers significant pioneers and figures within the field of early childhood, for example Rousseau, Froebel, Steiner, and Montessori. Their work is explored emphasising their long-lasting legacies in practice today. You are also introduced to play drawing upon a disciplined, as well as holistic, focus on children’s psychological, health and social growth. This is in keeping with the QAA benchmarks for Early Childhood Studies subject knowledge.

Key topics of the course may include: Constructs of Childhood; The Early Childhood Pioneers; The Value of Play
• No. of Contact Hours - 6 hrs/week
• ECS at Liverpool Hope University is an interdisciplinary subject. It incorporates the psychology, history, sociology and philosophy of education as well as the health, social policy, law, politics and economics of early childhood.
• ECS aims to produce an understanding of the ecology of early childhood, encompassing time and geographical space, and family contexts.
• ECS situates children in the lives and practices of families, societies and cultures that proceed and succeed them.
• ECS studies the changing nature of the concept of childhood, ethical principles and children’s rights.
• Students will learn about pedagogy and professionalism required for those working in settings or services that engage with children and families. Throughout the course students will develop knowledge and understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of studying children in context.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
- Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
- There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage
- Giardiello, P (2014). Pioneers in Early Childhood Education: The roots and legacies of Rachel and Margaret McMillan, Maria Montessori and Susan Isaacs. London: Routledge
- Paige-Smith, A. and Craft, A. (2008) Developing Reflective Practice in the Early Years. Maidenhead: OUP.
- Pound , L. (2011) Influencing Early Childhood Education: Key Figures, Philosophies and Ideas Maidenhead : Open University Press.
- Reed, M. and Canning, N. (2010) Reflective Practice in the Early Years. London: Sage.


Assessment

Type Word count/hours) Date of Submission
100% Reflective Portfolio: 4,000 words December

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: PRQI001

Available for Fall and Spring terms.
The curriculum specialist course has been designed by lead practitioners to support those with a passion and interest in developing innovative curriculum pedagogies and leadership within the primary school.
This course encourages you to shape your values and attitudes in order to develop you as an effective primary school curriculum leader. It supports students to explore the broad concept of primary curriculum leadership both nationally and globally. What it is to be a primary school curriculum leader today is investigated and the implications of this experience are debated. This course covers significant pedagogical principles of the primary national curriculum and how it can be interpreted in a variety of settings.

Students will have the opportunity to choose from one of seven primary specialist areas including; English, Maths, Science, Special Educational Needs, Early Years, Physical Education and Modern Foreign Languages.
This course also offers opportunities to work with primary school curriculum leaders reviewing and evaluating current practice in the classroom.
Professional Placement Block ( up to four weeks according to availability )
Students will be able to complete up to four weeks block placement in a partnership school setting. This professional placement will be in a primary school and will enable students to enact their learning from their taught block. Professional mentors will support your training in school and university tutors will support and quality assure you placement.

Assessment
50% Portfolio of reflective engagement in the Primary Curriculum (2,000 words)
50% Reflective Essay on the pedagogical principles of curriculum design (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EACC008

This course covers the construct of childhood based on historical and socio-cultural perspectives and goes through significant pioneers and figures within the field of early childhood (i.e Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Steiner, Froebel, Montessori, McMillan Sisters, Isaacs) and their lasting legacies. You will begin to acquire subject-specific skills at this level, which match the ECS benchmarks. For instance, you will be able to see multiple perspectives in relation to early childhood and start to analyse the relationship between them.

Key topics may include: the construct of childhood; The early childhood pioneers; Value of play, Play and holistic development.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage
- Giardiello, P (2014). Pioneers in Early Childhood Education: The roots and legacies of Rachel and Margaret McMillan, Maria Montessori and Susan Isaacs. London: Routledge



Assessment
100% E-Portfolio: Portfolio of reflective engagement in Early Childhood

SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND SPORT SCIENCES
STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: NUTI008

The course is a combination of two key areas in nutrition: assessment of nutritional status and lifestyle nutrition. The course will therefore begin by covering assessment of nutritional status (including anthropometry, dietary, clinical and laboratory assessments) and considerations of nutritional deficiencies and toxicities, moving on to the nutrition and lifestyle with focus on the nutrition in early stages, adolescence, pregnancy, lactation and old age. Overall, the context of applied nutrition encompassing those two key areas will be delivered with research (evidence)- informed approach, that is, research and evidence based practice in nutrition will be explored including development of understanding of the rigour of evidence in the process of decision-making in relation with nutrition.

In addition to a range of pedagogical approaches for teaching and learning, the development of independent learning for students draws particular attention. The theoretical perspectives will be delivered through two 1-hour lectures. The weekly 2-hour seminar will provide an opportunity for putting theory into practice. Students can actively learn and practice via taking part in laboratory practicals of assessment of nutritional status. Other seminars provide case studies and scenarios focusing on the relationship between nutrition and life cycle.

Assessment
75% Essay in applied Nutrition (3,000 words)
25% Practical assessment in a VIVA format (0.5 hours)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: NUTC002

The course will begin by covering what is meant by nutrition as a science and a profession and more importantly what food means to use, moving on to the historical perspectives in nutrition, foundations of nutritional sciences and principles of human nutrition including macronutrients, electrolytes and fluid balance and metabolism.
The overarching aim of these topics is to focus on the development and modification of diet in line with healthy eating.

Assessment
In Class test / online quiz (1 hour) for 50% of the marks
Essay - 1,500 words for 50% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: HSSI001

This module examines the physiological adaptations to chronic exercise (exercise training) alongside laboratory and / or field measures for quantifying fitness and training status. You will study system-wide effects of exercise training such as cardiac, vascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic adaptations. The module is based on lecture content that is supported by weekly tutorials which will consolidate your fundamental knowledge in the field via examination of the primary evidence in the field. Moreover, seminars will take a largely practical approach where you will learn laboratory and/or field techniques for the assessment of physiological function and training status, such as the lactate threshold and assessment of maximal oxygen uptake.

Assessment
40% Case study (2000 words)
60% Laboratory Report (3,000 words + Laboratory work)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SPHI002

This module examines some of the key sociological concepts relating to sport, including the role of commercialisation, politics and mega events. You will be introduced to a range of research methods that are typically used to collect data from across the sport subdisciplines and design and conduct a group research project. The module will be taught via weekly lectures, supported by weekly tutorials to consolidate your understanding and further develop your knowledge on the lecture content. Seminars will take a more interactive approach highlighting the staged approach to undertaking sound and ethical research with the opportunity to go through the process, designing a project and collecting and analysing data on a sport topic of choice.

Course aims
This module aims to provide students with:
1. a broad appreciation of theoretical and applied sport-related issues from a critical knowledge base, for example in a sociological historical context though to sport management and development today
2. enhanced personal and professional skills from a challenging and balanced curriculum that promotes critical thinking in theory and practice.
3. an understanding of the importance of allying theory with an understanding of research methodology and to introduce a range of research skills suitable for undertaking responsible and ethical research.

Learning outcomes
By the end of the module, students should be able to
1. Apply appropriate research methods, including analysis, to subject areas
2. Apply and evaluate key sporting theories and principles in a sporting context
3. Demonstrate professional and personal development of key practical skills in an applied environment

Tuition - Two lectures, a seminar and a tutorial on Monday

Group research ethics and poster presentation - 2,000 words for 80% of the marks
Tutorial workbook - 1,500 words for 20% of the marks

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MACH023

This course has been renamed ' Advanced Digital and Editorial Development' Please use both names on the course selection form.

This study abroad course is subject to Advanced Studies in Journalism running as a Level H Media and Communication seminar option - confirmed as running for 2022/3.

Students who wish to undertake this course will need prior experience of InDesign, Photoshop and Animate. They should also have experience of journalistic writing.

The course will offer students the opportunity to develop advanced news writing and publishing skills. Students will have the opportunity to develop professional media writing and editing skills, with a particular emphasis on feature writing for digital platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their technical and design skills with the Adobe Creative Cloud, specifically InDesign. Students will develop a critical awareness of wider developments in digital publishing.

The course will offer students the opportunity to develop advanced news writing and publishing skills. Students will have the opportunity to develop professional media writing and editing skills, with a particular emphasis on feature writing for digital platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their technical and design skills with the Adobe Creative Cloud, specifically InDesign. Students will develop a critical awareness of wider developments in digital publishing.

The course aims to provide students with:
1: A critical awareness of advanced cross-platform news writing skills and practices
2: A critical awareness of design and technical developments in digital publishing
3: Technical, design and animation competency in Adobe Creative Cloud applications (in particular, InDesign)

By the end of the course, students will be able to:
1: Write editorial content to specified briefs, with a specific focus on writing features and incidental content for digital platforms
2: Contextualise and critically reflect on their creative and design decisions in light of wider developments in digital publishing
3: Develop and design interactive content and animations for specified digital publishing platforms

Assessment
3,000 words - Portfolio including 1,500 words of journalistic content; plus ten pages of digital interactive design for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSC004

Course aims:
To equip students with:
- an approach to the study of world religions that is questioning, sensitive, empathetic and holistic;
- an appreciation of the complexity of different religious mentalities, practices and aesthetic responses;
- an understanding of the relationship between religion and context and culture

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this course the students will be able to express clearly the general characteristics of African traditional religions, and explain how they differ from those of other religious traditions.

Brief description:
This unit introduces you to some of the key aspects of the study of religion through the lens of the traditional religions of Africa. You will explore how ritual behaviour, myths, song, dance and the creation of religious artefacts come together to express people's understanding of the world and of themselves as communities. We use one of the great classics of African Literature, Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart to enter into a world that is very different to the religions that are generally studied at school.

Timetable: 2 lectures and 2 seminars

Essay - 1,500 words 100%

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: THOH003

We will explore key thinkers and themes in C20th-C21st Theology as they respond to a century of unprecedented conflict. Specifically, we will examine the challenges arising on the wake of evil and suffering, feminism, postmodernism, the Holocaust, and the revival of interest in the mystical. Key to this is the question of how theological ideas about ‘God’ might be (re-)interpreted in the light of these new horizons.

Course aims
- To familiarise students with key thinkers and themes in C20th-C21st Theology.
- To develop critical approaches to ideas about God in response to the challenges of (post-)modernity.


Learning outcomes
- Critically understand the impact of political and social developments since 1900 upon systematic Christian theology and contextual praxis.
- Reflect critically upon key themes in C20th-C21st Theology.


Course Structure: 1 x lecture and 1 x Seminar a week (Thursday 9-10am and 10-11am)

Assessment
Essay - 3,000 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: CRWI002

This course will explore the theme of ‘Writing Values’. Indicative lecture titles are Writing and Reading Intermediate Poetry, Writing and the Body, Writing and Gender, Creative Nonfiction, Writing and the Self, and Writing and Conflict. Students will be encouraged to connect their writing practice to contemporary intellectual concerns and use these questions as inspiration for original writing in a variety of modes.
Students will attend one lecture and a linked seminar/practical writing workshop.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Creative writing portfolio ( 2 x 2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PLII020

This course aims to provide students with a strong understanding of the theory and practice of key aspects of democracy in theory and in practice. It considers the role of the state and the attitudes of those who help shape democracy on an individual and an institutional bass, and explores the history and evolution of democracy.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Debating Democracy essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PLII023

The course will look at the British political system. It will include consideration of democratic institutions in the UK such as the Houses of Parliament, the Government and the electoral system. It will consider the extent to which Britain can be considered a ‘party democracy’. It will also examine challenges of democracy in the UK, including debates over devolution of power and over the role of the European Union.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Democracy in Britain Essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: HISI037

The European Nationalism in Context seminar series explores the emergence and impact of European nationalism both within and outside continental Europe. From the French and Haitian Revolution to imperialism in Africa and the outbreak of the First World War, the course draws attention to the blurred boundaries of Europe in turbulent period of war and revolution. Through lectures and seminars students are introduced to primary source materials and important secondary works to provide them with a wider appreciation of the complexities of European history and society.

The course aims to provide students with:
1. A wide-ranging, stimulating and challenging curriculum that is underpinned by research and scholarship;
2. The opportunity to increase the range, depth and sophistication of their historical knowledge;
3. Guidance and support in developing their understanding and application of historical thinking;
4. Guidance and support in developing intellectual skills and aptitudes which can be applied to further study, training and employment;
5. The opportunity to work with a wide range of primary source material.

By the end of the course students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of important political, social and intellectual developments in modern Europe;
2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the historical process and a greater awareness of the complexity of reconstructing the past;
3. Demonstrate the ability to select, read, analyse and reflect critically upon a range of secondary material and some forms of primary evidence;
4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of aspects of cultural history, including conceptual and theoretical issues;
5. Demonstrate a critical appreciation and awareness of historiographical issues.

Type

Seminar assignment 1,500 WORDS FOR 50% OF MARKS
Essay 2,000 WORDS FOR 50% OF MARKS

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PHEI008

This course will explore the relationship between faith and reason and questions about the nature and limits of language about God. It will include focused investigation of negative theology and analogy.

Course Structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour seminar , 1 x 1 hour tutorial.

Assessment
100% Textual analysis (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSC001

The course aims to introduce students to the contemporary study of Islam. It begins by covering matters to do with the origins of Islam, the Quran and tradition-literature. It goes on to consider Sunni and Shi'i traditions, and the institution of Sufism, theology and jurisprudence. Throughout, consideration is given to contemporary relevance of the early articulations of Islam.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELIC015

While this course can change year to year, the course focuses on poetry in relation to historical developments and different critical perspectives from a range of different time periods up to the present day. The seminars are supported by a lecture strand that focuses on these same texts, providing students with background information and historical context, suggesting ways that such information can be used to enrich their reading. Students are also challenged to consider a range of critical perspectives and the implications that their application would have on the interpretation of the texts studied, suggesting how different critical perspectives highlight some areas of a text while minimising the importance or visibility of others.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSH001

Even before the time that European expansion started to exert pressure on the regions with predominantly Muslim populations, and even more after the beginning of invasion and control by the metropolitan powers, Islam and the ways it is observed have been assessed by intellectuals as possible factors in the relative economic and military weakness of those regions. This course will examine various genres in Islamic political writings to assess whether such claims are true.

Course Structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour Seminar a week.

Assessment
Textual Analysis - 3,000 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSI002

We will explore the ethical foundations and particular challenges within Jewish and Christian traditions. This will involve particular engagement with Jewish and Christian spirituality, considering to what extent mystical ideas align with ethics. As well as examining fundamental questions concerning the relationship between religion and ethics, we will examine specific issues pertaining to Judaism (the holocaust) and Christianity (feminist theory).

Assessment
Essay - 3,000 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ENLC007

This course will introduce students with key issues on societal multilingualism covering topics like pidgins and creoles, codeswitching, diglossia, language maintenance, shift and death, language policy and planning, etc.

Course structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELII043

In small tutorial groups, this course focuses upon one Major Author of the literary canon. This course
provides students with the opportunity to engage in the careful study of selected texts to enhance an
understanding of the historical, intellectual and cultural contexts within which texts were written. In
addition, the course will also provide tutorials about publishing history. In the past the course involved an
analysis of both early reviews and recent critical perspectives on the set texts and allowed students to
explore publishing practices in historical context from various sources. Also, students examined issues
related to the production, publication, and reception of texts, examining the demands of serialised
publication and their effects on form and narrative structure, editorial interventions, the reception of
instalments as they were published and the subsequent reception of the text under analysis.

Course aims
The opportunity to compare and contrast various literary texts;
¿ An awareness of the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history and of the literary, cultural
and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;
¿ The opportunity to compare the way key themes are represented and explored within different
texts of the period;
¿ Critical skills in close reading and analysis and the communication skills necessary to articulate
coherent interpretations, analyses, and arguments.

Learning outcomes
Demonstrate an awareness of key intellectual debates and social issues that are represented
within the literature of a particular era;
¿ Demonstrate an understanding of important literary movements of the era as exemplified by a
key writer of the period;
¿ Demonstrate knowledge of relevant textual and contextual criticism and show an ability to apply
this to particular texts;
¿ Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast the treatment of particular ideas and issues
within different texts from the period;
¿ Demonstrate the ability to identify and discuss the formal conventions, narrative strategies, and
textual dynamics employed in particular texts and/or groups of texts.



Essay 1 - 1,500 words for 50% of the marks
Essay 2 - 1,500 words for 50% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ELII034

Learning Outcomes – Participants should be able to:
• Demonstrate detailed knowledge of key literary works of set author(s)
• Demonstrate understanding of the historical, intellectual and cultural contexts within which these texts under discussion were produced
• Demonstrate an ability to critically analyse how the set author(s) engaged with key social and cultural debates
• Provide close analysis of set texts using relevant critical and theoretical perspectives

This module examines the poetry, prose and drama of the late medieval and early modern periods. It interrogates the traditional historiographical and critical divisions between medieval and Renaissance periodisation through an analysis of both the ruptures and the continuities in literature from the fourteenth to the early seventeenth centuries. Through a comparative examination of authors such as Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, John Lydgate, Margery Kempe, Ben Jonson, Edmund Spenser, John Donne and Shakespeare, the course acknowledges the debts which early modern poetry and drama owe to their late medieval counterparts, and in doing so reassesses what we understand by the term Renaissance.

Type and Title of assessment

Essay 2,000 words 75%

Critical analysis 1,000 words 25%

Timetable:
1 Lecture
3 Seminars

30 credits

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ELIH039

This English Literature course will examine the impact of modernism in literature and related arts through a range of modernist texts from the first half of the twentieth century, including British and American primary texts in different genres. In addition, students will be introduced to relevant critical and theoretical ideas. The component aims to develop specific skills in close-reading, bibliographic research, and in applied critical and theoretical interpretations of modernism. Selected texts will vary each year, but have included Franz Kafka, Metamorphosis; James Joyce, Dubliners; Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway; and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender is the Night.
Students will explore key features of modernism through different literary genres and national contexts. A parallel lecture series will foreground historical, scientific, aesthetic, and intellectual aspects of modernism and modernity. Seminars will examine the work of key modernist authors and explore major critical issues and theoretical debates.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,500 words)
20% Annotated Bibliography (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PHEH007

This course will explore questions concerning the concepts of truth, reality and religion in the wake of the Enlightenment, with a particular focus on contemporary philosophical responses to the fact of religious diversity.

Course structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: PHEC006

This course will introduce students to the main ethical theories in western philosophy, focusing particularly on the question of the moral treatment of animals. The course also explores metaethics, which addresses questions such as: Why be moral? Are ethical principles and values relative or universal? What is the meaning of ‘good’?

Assessment
40% Ethical Dilemma exercise (1,200 words)
60% Essay on Moral philosophy (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHTI005

Course Aims:
The course will enable you to:
• engage in a sophisticated manner with the academic disciplines of theology and biblical studies, and with key scholars and developments in the
fields;
• to develop and apply skills in language usage and textual interpretation, enabling you to approach theological and biblical texts appropriately.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this course the students will be able to engage critically with New Testament epistolary literature and demonstrate knowledge of select issues as well as the reception history of a selection of New Testament letters in the Reformation period.

Brief description of curriculum content:
Letters written by, or ascribed to, the Apostle Paul, form an important part of the New Testament, and some of the main controversies during the Reformation period centred around theological ideas first attested in the Pauline and other early Christian letters. In this unit we study select New Testament letters, including 1 Thessalonians, Romans, Galatians, Hebrews, and James. We relate them to the Reformation debates, and thus focus on the themes of particular significance for the reformers and those opposing them, but our aim is primarily to understand the writings and themes under consideration in their first century context.

Textual Analysis - 2,500 words (100%)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PHEI010

Incorporating examples from a range of the arts, including: painting, poetry, sculpture, architecture, drama, music and film, and focusing on major themes such as: beauty, inspiration, expression, poetics, symbolism, phenomenology, hermeneutics, and the imagination, this course critically examines the theories and perspectives of key figures and movements within the field of philosophical aesthetics.

Course Structure: 1 x lecture and 1 x Seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ENLC006

The course will include an introduction to articulatory phonetics focusing particularly on the phonetics and phonology of English. We will examine the speech sounds of English and look at how sounds are organised in the language. Students will also learn to produce and describe the sounds using the correct terminology and they will learn how to read the International Phonetic Alphabet and to use it to transcribe different accents/languages.

Course structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture, 1 x seminar and 1 x 1 hour tutorial a week.

Assessment
100% A take home assignment on Phonetics and Phonology (1,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PHEI009

This course examines the nature of democracy as it is formulated by philosophers such as Plato, Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and J.S. Mill. It also explores problems and criticisms of democracy as it is conceived in the liberal tradition, focusing on thinkers such Karl Marx, John Rawls and feminist philosophers such as Anne Phillips.

Course Structure: 1 x Lecture and 1 x Seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ENLI022

This course combines several different areas of linguistic research – historical linguistics, language variation and change, dialectology, internet linguistics and onomastics. This course considers the diachronic processes of change on all levels of language: phonology and phonetics (sound system), morphology and syntax (grammar), lexis (vocabulary) and semantics (meaning), as well as pragmatics and discourse. It also considers synchronic variation on these levels (as precursors for potential change), including the most recent changes to language due to introduction of digital technologies (internet, social media). Students will also learn about theoretical approaches to and mechanisms of language change, and the role of extra-linguistic factors. The introduction of Name Studies will also show how names for a part of the linguistic system that also undergoes changes over time.

Course aims
To introduce different types and patterns of language change and consolidate knowledge of levels of language on which such a change can occur;

Teaching - one lecture and one seminar per week



• to introduce different theories that explain how language changes and look at them critically;
• to understand how names (particularly of places and people) can be analysed linguistically and how they can be studied over time;

Learning outcomes
• Be able to analyse spoken and/or written texts in different diachronic and synchronic varieties of English;
• Be able to consider Present-Day English(es) not as an end-point of the historical process, but another transitional stage of language change and observe linguistic features in real-time;
• Develop skills in engaging critically in theoretical literature on the subject;
• Be able to reflect how technological advances affect language use on various levels;
• Understand the role and nature of names from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Teaching - one lecture and one seminar per week on Thursday 9-10am and 10-11am.

Portfolio of Essays: Task 1 – Orthography/Phonetics/Grammar - 750 words for 50% of the marks

Portfolio of Essays: Task 2 – Semantics/Lexis/Discourse - 750 words for 50% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSH002

Religion was often held up as a vessel of peace, inner (A protestant emphasis) and social. Given an uneven trend over the centuries toward cultural pluralism and ‘freedom’, modern theorists optimistically concluded that religion would either decline in significance or become a pillar of universalistic culture promoting a form of humanism. So, as a flash point of violence from the past, religion did not warrant attention in the overall narrative of the modern world. YET, such a reading of historical development is far too optimistic, as events of September 11, 2001, all too vividly demonstrate. A moment’s reflection attests that religion and violence are often woven together in history’s tapestries. Any number of religions have justified violence under certain circumstances, and others have become caught up in its processes. The course in the Lent term will focus on theoretical and practical implications for religion’s contribution both to violence and to reconciliation looking at theological/theoretical reflections as well as the Middle Eastern lived reality today.

Course Structure: 1 x lecture and 1 x Seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHTH004

This course aims to enable students to:
- critically evaluate the relationship between spiritual practices and social and broader cultural developments both within and outside Eastern Christian Churches across a number of different contexts;
- engage critically with the academic discipline of theology and with key contemporary Eastern Christian thinkers and developments;
- critically evaluate the impact of political and social developments since 1900 upon Eastern Christian theology and contextual praxis.

Course structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour seminar.

Assessment
100% Essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: HISC006

This course explores key developments in European history including the origins and nature of the First World War; the Russian Revolution; the political and economic developments of the interwar years; the rise of Fascism and Nazism; the Spanish Civil War; the Second World War; the Cold War; political and social developments in Western Europe, 1960s-80s, and the revival of Nationalism in the 1990s.

This course aims to provide students with:
A wide-ranging, stimulating and challenging curriculum that is underpinned by research and scholarship;
The opportunity to increase the range, depth and sophistication of their historical knowledge;
Guidance and support in developing their understanding and application of historical thinking;
Guidance and support in developing intellectual skills and aptitudes which can be applied to further study, training and employment;
The opportunity to work with a wide range of primary source material.

By the end of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of Twentieth-Century European history and some understanding of the relationships involved in the historical process;
Demonstrate the ability to acquire, organise and reflect upon historical material;
Demonstrate the ability to communicate an effective argument.


Assessment
Short essay - 'Europe in 1900' (800 words) for 30% of the overall mark
Essay - 'Twentieth-Century Europe' (2000 words) for 70% of the overall mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: HISI035

This course surveys the development witchcraft and witch beliefs in early modern England and colonial America. Within the broader context of the European 'witch-craze', it explores the character of English witchcraft, including its gendered aspects. It examines the transfer of these beliefs to the English colonies in North America, culminating in the witch panic at Salem in 1692. During the course a range of different source extracts will be analysed, in a weekly seminar, to illuminate and illustrate key aspects of the subjects.

he course aims to provide students with:
1. A wide-ranging, stimulating and challenging curriculum that is underpinned by research and scholarship;
2. The opportunity to increase the range, depth and sophistication of their historical knowledge;
3. Guidance and support in developing their understanding and application of historical thinking;
4. Guidance and support in developing intellectual skills and aptitudes which can be applied to further study, training and employment;
5. The opportunity to work with a wide range of primary source material, including physical evidence;
6. The opportunity to benefit from the university's partnership with National Museums Liverpool.

By the end of the course students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of important political, social and intellectual developments in early modern and modern Europe;
2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the historical process and a greater awareness of the complexity of reconstructing the past;
3. Demonstrate the ability to select, read, analyse and reflect critically upon a range of secondary material and some forms of primary evidence;
4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of aspects of culture history, including conceptual issues;
5. Demonstrate a critical appreciation and awareness of historiographical issues.

Assessment
TWO PIECES OF COURSEWORK, TYPICALLY AN ESSAY, PLUS A PORTFOLOIO, PERSONAL REFLECTION, OR PRESENTATION.

Assessment 1 2,000 words for 50% of total marks
Assessment 2 - 2,000 words for 50% of the total marks
(4,000 words in total)

SCHOOL OF LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: LAWH013

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: LAWH012

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: LAWC012

Full Year Course Only - only chose this course if you are studying the Double Program

Fall semester synopsis:
This is a legal skills course. In essence, the word ‘praxis’ describes the process by which a theory, lesson, or skill is enacted, embodied, or realised. ‘Praxis’ may also refer to the act of engaging, applying, exercising, realizing, or practising ideas. It therefore involves putting the theory of legal skills into practice by doing exercises that are designed to develop those skills.
On this course, for international students, we will focus on two of these skills:
(1) The skill of negotiation;
(2) Interviewing skills;
The assessments on this course, for international students, will be assessments in negotiation skills.

To be confirmed

- Early stakes Test in 'Negotiation Theory and Practice' (in-class test) for 20% of the marks
- Negotiation Assessment exercise for 80% of the marks (performance and a written submission

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CRMH009

Course available FALL and SPRING

FALL: (Synopsis Pending - similar to below

SPRING:
- Psychology in the CJS, FBI offender profiling and Investigative psychology, Lie detection and polygraph tests, Eyewitness testimony, Children as witnesses Psychology in rehabilitation and parole.
- Psychological treatments for sex offenders, Incarcerating the criminally insane Risk Assessment and Recidivism

Course aims
Looks at the fundamentals of criminal and forensic psychology, specifically applying psychological knowledge to crime and investigation. Important and relevant research from the UK and internationally will be explored in depth while key concepts and controversies will provide students with a broader understanding of the subject.

Learning outcomes
- Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and critical understanding of key areas of psychological criminology
- Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of psychological theory in explaining criminal behaviour and in developing intervention strategies to prevent and reduce offending
- Demonstrate an understanding of how psychology is applied to improving practice in criminal justice settings in the real world

Teaching - one lecture per week on Friday 12-1pm


Assessment
Essay - 3,000 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: LAWC011

FULL YEAR COURSE ONLY - only chose this course if you are studying the Double Program

Introduction to Public Law explores the dynamic nature of constitutional and administrative law in the United Kingdom. Although the U.K. lacks a constitution expressed via one document, or even via several documents, there is much to study. The class pays particular attention to the legislation, case law, treaties, history, politics, values, and related phenomena that have shaped and continue to shape the British Constitution. Along the way, students will encounter key subjects such as parliamentary supremacy, separation of powers, the rule of law, judicial review, and human rights, all of which are essential to understanding constitutional and administrative law in the U.K. today. The course also considers select issues from a comparative law angle.

Assessment
Early Stakes Assessment for 10% of the marks
Portfolio made up of 3 components for 90% of the marks

The assessment will be in March.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: LAWC013

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MATH011

The student will choose two of the following topics:
1. Chaos Theory - Discrete dynamical systems; Lyapunov exponents; cyclic behaviour of solutions; systems of equations and chaotic solutions therein; fractals.
2. Linear & Nonlinear Waves - First order PDEs and waves, applications to traffic, dispersion waves and nonlinear equations
3. Group Theory - Group Axioms, Subgroups, Groups: Symmetric-, cyclic-, alternating-, dihedral- and matrix-groups, Isomorphisms, cosets, Lagrange’s Theorem, external direct product and Smith Normal Forms.
4. Statistics & Data Modelling - Probability and statistics, discrete and continuous probabilities density functions, fitting data using ¿2, uncertainties and confidence levels.

The aim of the course is to give the student a deeper understanding of some of the many topics within mathematics and to develop their knowledge further of the pure and applied side of mathematics. The course is designed to give the student the opportunity to choose from a list of four topics, and will enhance their appreciation of the depth of mathematics.

Assessment
100% Coursework.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MATC009

The course will cover the following topics:
Sequences, Difference equations, modelling with difference equations, solution techniques, dynamical systems.
Graph Theory: Paths and Cycles, connectivity of graphs, Eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, algorithms, colourings, planar graphs, directed graphs.

The course aims to provide the student with the fundamentals of discrete including a grounding in Graph Theory and Difference Equations, with an introduction to Mathematical Modelling.

Learning outcomes - students will be able to:
¿ Use a broad range of fundamental analytical methods to solve well-defined problems.
¿ Apply fundamental numerical methods to well-defined problems.
¿ Formulate real world problems into mathematical problems using basic mathematical modelling techniques.


Portfolio - for 67% of the marks
Coursework assessment - for 33% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MATI010

The aim of the course is to enable the students to understand the techniques needed to solve ordinary differential equations both numerically and analytically. The student will also learn other numerical methods to solve systems of ordinary differential equations.

Systems of ODEs, Linear systems, Nonlinear systems and phase portrait, Lotka-Volterra systems and population dynamics, Numerical methods for initial value problems.

Assessment
50% Portfolio
50% Coursework

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCH024

What is austerity? How is it connected to gender? How does it legitimate and re-produce inequality in the UK? This research course will answer these questions, introducing students to the topic of austerity and its gendered impacts. We will explore the different ways in which austerity has been produced, legitimised and made present by the State since 2010. The course will also situate austerity within its historical legacies to demonstrate how austerity builds on a previous history. Then, drawing on research that understands and unpacks lived experience, we will examine the gendered impact of austerity to explore how austerity is lived with, spoken about, navigated through and resisted in multivariant ways.

Learning outcomes
• To critically analyse, interpret and evaluate relevant empirical data and theoretical perspectives on austerity, gender and the State.
• Be able to situate debates within a longer history and understand the legacies that underpin experiences in the present.

Indicative course content:
1: Introduction
2: What is Austerity?
3. Historical Legacies of Austerity
4. Austerity, Gender, Politics and the Media
5. Living with and Navigating through Austerity
6. Resisting Austerity
7. Afterlives of Austerity
8. Conclusions/Summary

Essay - 2,500 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCSH001

This research seminar will interrogate the place of post-work imaginaries as a feature of contemporary sociological thought. The increased precariousness of work in the Western world, combined with the advanced development of productive technologies has prompted a sociological imagination of social futures that move beyond work entirely. These seminars will analyse the historical development of post-work ideas, alongside the historical development of the material conditions of society that have made post-work imaginaries both urgent and necessary. As critical thinkers, we will also use these seminars to explore the veracity of the ‘radicalism’ of post-work thought: is it really the antidote to contemporary capitalism or the logical end-point of a capitalism increasingly less dependent upon human labour-power?

Course aims
1. To learn about the theoretical underpinnings of contemporary post-work thought, through a reading of Marxist political economy.
2. To appreciate how post-work thought is reflected in a number of contemporary social policies within the field of work and employment.
3. To develop a critical perspective on these ideas and their reflection in policy through an engagement with critical literature within the sociology of work today.

Learning outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the sociological conditions implicated in the contemporary ‘problem’ with work.
2. Understand and apply theoretical concepts and ideas in the critical evaluation of these sociological conditions.
3. Acknowledgement of the contemporary literature on post-work thought and its reflection in society and social policy

Essay - 2,500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCH025

In the first part of the course we will discuss theories of rationality in the social sciences. In the second part we will study a
wide range of empirical topics analysed using those theories. In the last part will reflect the extent of the usefulness of
theories of rationality for the study of the social world.

Course aims/description
Why would an individual vote at an election if the probability of one vote impacting its outcome is almost null?
Why do some believe in conspiracy theories or join sects and terrorist groups? Why are social scientists often in
disagreement with one another’s theories and analyses? Answers to those seemingly disparate questions
presuppose a clarification of how people reason. In this perspective, this course investigates the relationship
between rationality, its social determinants, and its social effects. This will be achieved by considering sociological
theories of rationality and their application to the study of concrete questions of our time such as those presented
above.

Learning outcomes
At the end of this course, students should be familiar with various theories of rationality in the social sciences and apply them
to the study of specific topics of interest. They should also be able to understand the scope and limits of each theory of
rationality.


Essay - 2,500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHYI003

Introduction to the UNCRC and children’s rights
Exploration of the concept of social justice
Exploration of key contemporary issues relating children and young people

Course Learning Outcomes:
Exhibit detailed knowledge and understanding of key theoretical debates relating to children and young people’s everyday lives

Assessment

Essay - 1500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCI017

The course aims to equip students with the analytical skills and knowledge to be able to identify and critically examine forms of diversity and inequality in contemporary society, including the sites of power and modes of stratification in which they are manifested. It aims to introduce and develop students’ understanding and awareness of the relationship between power, inequality, division and connection using sociological insights and analyses.

Indicative content:
1. Course Introduction
2. Social Stratification
3. Class as Culture
4. Classed Intersections
5. The Underclass
6. ‘Chavs’ and Stigma
7. The Precariat
8. The Great British Class Survey
9. The Super Rich
10. Global Social Class
11. Class, Taste and Popular Culture
12. Conclusion: Does Class Still Matter?

Learning Outcomes
• Locate and distinguish between key approaches within sociology for explaining the persistence of class inequality in an age of abundance;
• Discuss the major social divisions and the relevance of identity in contemporary society;
• Critically analyse, interpret and evaluate relevant empirical data and theoretical perspectives on social inequalities and diversity.

Essay - 2,500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOPH006

An introduction to the comparative method and an overview of the historical development of social policies in Sweden, Germany and the United States of America.

Course Aims
- To explore comparative social policy theory
- To trace the development of welfare states in three different countries

Learning Outcomes
- A critical understanding of comparative social policy theory
- The ability to compare and contrast different welfare states and their development

Essay - 1,500 words for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHYC003

The course will introduce students to a range of social, economic and cultural issues affecting the everyday lives of children and young people, both in the UK and beyond. Topics will include, but are not limited to, poverty, social media, health and wellbeing, drug use and violent crime (topics may change on an ad hoc basis so that curriculum currency is maintained). The theme will be anchored by consideration of theoretical debates regarding the state of contemporary childhood and youth.

Course Aims
1. To provide an introduction to a range of issues affecting children and young people’s everyday lives.
2. To introduce and examine debates about the state of contemporary childhood and youth.

Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of contemporary issues that make up children and young people’s everyday lives in the 21st century.
2. Evaluate the extent to which contemporary childhood can be seen as being in a state of crisis.
3. Demonstrate an ability to use a range of academic and other relevant sources of information.

Teaching - Three lectures, one seminars and one tutorial on Thursday (9am -4pm)

Essay - 1,500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH007

New Course - awaiting description - we will update this site when we have further information.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SENC007

Short Course - 5 weeks

Awaiting course description - we will update this site when we have further information

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH002

New course - awaiting description - we will update this site as soon as we have further information

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH009

New course - awaiting description. - we will update this site when we have further information

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SENI011

This 15-credit course in SEN will enable you examine current legislation relating to the identification of and provision for children with so-called special educational needs. You will be introduced to medical and social models of disability and will reflect on your understanding of these models in relation to current policy and legislation.

This course draws more specifically on cognition and learning as one of the four broad areas of need from the SEN Code of Practice. You will explore dominant ideas about impairment and the implications for learners. This course will enable you to explore Special Educational Needs in the UK. Seminar and tutorial sessions will offer an opportunity for you to make comparisons with your home context.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SENI012

This 15-credit course in SEN will enable you examine current legislation relating to the identification of and provision for children with so-called special educational needs. You will be introduced to medical and social models of disability and will reflect on your understanding of these models in relation to current policy and legislation.

This course will enable you to explore key themes of diversity and inclusion from UK and international perspectives. It encourages you to explore the ways in which we conceptualise difference through the identification and use of labelling and interventions for children. This course encourages you to explore recent and relevant literature in order to explore the relationship between disability and education in the UK and beyond. This course will enable you to explore Special Educational Needs in the UK and offers an opportunity for you to make comparisons with your home context through group discussion and participation in seminars.

Assessment
Annotated Bibliography (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCI018

Brief description of curriculum content
- Identity
- Social construction
- Essentialism
- Intersectionality
- Gender and sexuality in health and social care domains
- Social change
- Social reproduction
- Masculinities
- interpersonal violence

Course aims
The course aims to foster a critical engagement with theoretical debates and empirical evidence surrounding sociological approaches to sexuality and gender and raises questions about enduring inequalities and social change. As a result students will develop confidence in using empirical and theoretical knowledge to make the case to influence practice and legislation to address inequalities.

Learning outcomes
• Locate and distinguish between key approaches within sociology for explaining the persistence of inequalities based on fgender and sexaulity in an age of abundance;

• Discuss the major social divisions and the relevance of identity in contemporary society, focusing on its relationship to race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, dis/ability, religion, nation, citizenship etc.;

• Critically analyse, interpret and evaluate relevant empirical data and theoretical perspectives on social inequalities and diversity with reference to gender or sexuality.

Teaching - one lecture and one seminar per week on Thursday 10-11am and 11-12pm


Oral ten minute presentation and supporting powerpoint, or poster for 100% of the marks

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCSH006

During this course we will explore the gendered dynamics of migration. We will examine a range of approaches to gender, migrations and diasporas and will address the social and political dimensions of migration. Through the lenses of postcolonial studies, transnational feminism and cultural studies, we will focus on analysing power relations and oppression. Focusing on a number of key issues, such as transnational care, generational patterns in migration, we will consider the significance of feminist research in developing the field of migration studies. In addition, students develop skills in critical analysis through assessed work which includes critical review in form of an essay.

Course Aims
The aim of this advance research course is to explore the identity politics and experience of migrants in the global North. This Arc will help students to utilize intersectional feminist lens in their development of academic writing and understanding the diasporic experiences. It will provide the students in depth knowledge on social differentiation among diaspora groups, everyday experience of refugees and formation of transnational identities.

Learning Outcomes
1. Have a good understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to migration studies.
2. Obtain academic skills to analyse different forms of migration and diaspora experience from a gendered perspective.
3. Be familiar with a number of empirical examples and case studies pertaining to the question of how migration experiences are gendered.
4. Cross-examine and analyse different forms of migration experience from an intersectional feminist perspective.
5.Be able to critically evaluate a variety of books, journals and other sources of information relevant to the topics studied on the course.


Written assessment - 2,500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOPC004

This module will examine the historical development of the welfare state in the UK in the 19th and early 20th Century. After a general introduction to the topic of Social Policy, the course will cover key historical developments in UK social policy, from the New Poor Laws to the Liberal Reforms, ending with the formation of the post-war welfare state in the UK. Students taking this module will also take a weekly tutorial to gain a grounding in Social Policy issues, which will provide an opportunity to participate in a learning community with other students.

Course aims
Provide students with the opportunity to explore historical developments in relation to welfare developments.
Enable students to develop a grounding in social policy issues.

Learning outcomes
To understand historical shifts in relation to welfare provision.
To gain awareness of the relationship between poverty, inequality and social circumstances.

Essay 1,000 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOPI006

As part of the Introduction to Social Policy Research, you will learn about the different research methodologies used within social research and how these methodologies are applied in social policy scholarship. Key concepts such as epistemology and ontology will be explored, as well as important aspects of the research process such as data collection and research ethics.

Course aims
1. Examine and understand major concepts in social policy.
2. Explore the research process and different methods used when doing social policy research.

Learning outcomes
1. Judge the relevance and usefulness of a range of methodological approaches to social research and be able to design a study with an appropriate research topic and corresponding methodology.
2. Be able to compare and contrast different research methods and ideological approaches to social policy.
3. Communicate concepts and ideas with other students in group work environments.
4. Be able to communicate, in written form, an understanding of research methodologies.
5. By the end of Level I you should have a solid grounding in, and understanding of, research methods and how social policy academics and practitioners rely on these methods to produce social policy scholarship.

Academic Literature Review - 1,500 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCC007

- Developing a ‘sociological imagination’
- Core principles of sociology
- Social divisions (e.g. by class, race/ethnicity, gender, disability, sexuality etc.)


Course aims
- To introduce students to sociology, and in so doing, help them to think like a sociologist by developing a ‘sociological imagination’;
- To introduce and examine the key principles foundational to sociological thinking;
- To explore contemporary issues and the ways in which sociology can help us understand (and provide solutions to) the social issues in society with which we are confronted.

Learning outcomes
Following the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
- Describe the key features of sociology, its distinctiveness from other disciplines, and its capacity to explain the relationship between the individual and society;
- Apply sociological thinking to ‘real world’ settings and contemporary issues by critically engaging with key concepts and skills central to sociology;
- Search for appropriate sources of sociological information, drawing upon a variety of study skills and academic literacies in order to answer sociological questions and enrich understanding of the social world.

Teaching
Three lectures and a Seminar on Tuesday and a Tutorial on Wednesday

Assessment
Essay - 1,500 words for 100% of the marks

*Students will complete portfolio tasks (4,000 words) that provide the basis for tutorials, but they do not carry credits and students will not submit the portfolio for assessment

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCI016

This course exams the key concepts and ideas of sociological thinkers from the classical tradition. It places their ideas in social and historical context and assesses the continued relevance of these thinkers in the 21st century.

Course aims:
1. To introduce students to the key concepts and theoretical ideas of sociological thinkers from the classical tradition;
2. To encourage students to engage critically (and evaluatively) with the work of sociological thinkers from the classical era;
3. To enable students to apply the key concepts and theoretical ideas of sociological thinkers from the classical tradition in order to aid our understanding of social issues in the 21st century.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCRI006

Students will consider the role and function of Public Health in England and how this has changed over time. They will look at the structure and function of Public health in contemporary England, including the role of policy in shaping Public Health responses. Students will explore a range of key Public Health issues such as: Sexual Health, Infectious Disease, Mental Health, Violence and Drug use. Students will appraise the Public Health response to these issues in England.

Course aims
• Understanding of the structure and function of Public Health in England
• Understanding of the role of Public Health in England
• Understanding of a range of contemporary Public Health issues in England

Learning Outcomes
Students will be able to:
• Demonstrate understanding of the role of Public Health in England
• Appraise the Public Health response to a range of key issues in England



Portfolio - 2,000 words for 100% of the mark

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH005

New course - awaiting description - we will update this site when we have further information

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCRC002

Students will consider different approaches to health and wellbeing. They will look at how people understand their own health and wellbeing as well as how health and wellbeing is officially defined. They will then move onto consider the ways in which health and wellbeing is socially determined and the inequalities in health that occur as a result of this. Students will explore a range of social determinants such as: socioeconomic status; gender; ethnicity and social relationships.

Course aims
• Understanding of different approaches to health and wellbeing
• Understanding of the social determinants of health and wellbeing
• Understanding of inequalities in health and wellbeing

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:
• Demonstrate understanding of the ways in which health and wellbeing is socially determined
• Demonstrate understanding of inequalities in health and wellbeing and the link between these and social determinants

Essay - 2,000 words for 100% of the mark