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spring Study Abroad and Exchange Courses

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BUSINESS SCHOOL
STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ACFI003

This course looks at the key accounting standards, prescribed formats and accounting treatment required for limited company accounts. It looks at both the recognition and measurement of accounting standards for single entity accounts.

We will review key accounting standards governing the accounting treatment for:
- Property plant and equipment, recognition measurement and revaluation
- Assets held for sale
- Intangible fixed assets and impairment of assets
- leasing
- Inventory
- Revenue recognition
- The conceptual framework

Assessment
100% - Prepare responses to short questions covering key accounting standards (1,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARH007

This course examines the evolution of the brand and assesses the significance of this method of marketing. Basic criteria are developed for the description and analysis of brand performance across the marketing domain. The nature of brand strategies is explored and cases illustrate the diversity of methods to achieve common goals.

Number of Contact hours: 2 x 1 hour lectures; 1 x 2 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Branding report (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARI010

This course will examine a number of key aspects of consumer behaviour – the study of individuals, groups, or organizations and all the activities associated with the purchase, use and disposal of goods and services, including the consumer's emotional, mental and behavioural responses that precede or follow these activities. The course will also analyse the impact that the phenomenon of celebrity has on people’s consumption of goods and services.

Assessment
100% Consumer Behaviour Report (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARI005

This module will give students an in-depth understanding of the marketing communication mix both from a theoretical and practical perspective. It will explore how companies can effectively blend a number of different forms of communication to strengthen their market position. The course will also acknowledge the development of the new media by which organisations may communicate with stakeholders and how such communications affect business and society.

Topics covered will include:
-Advertising
-Direct marketing
-Digital and interactive media
-Sales promotion, merchandising and point of sale
-Public relations and corporate identity
-Sponsorship
-Personal selling and sales management

Assessment
100% Report setting out an Integrated Marketing Communications plan for a company of the student’s choosing.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: BMAI016

The module will examine a wide range of project management topics, including the following:
Project strategy
Project selection and Portfolio management
Leadership and project manager
Project Team building
Scope management
Risk management
Cost estimation and budgeting
Project scheduling
Resource management
Project evaluation and control
Project closeout and termination (Knowledge management)

Assessment
100% Project Management Report (1,200 words equivalent)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARI008

This course will examine some of the key decisions faced by retailers in today’s increasingly digital world. Students will analyse options for optimum store and web-page layouts, the use of atmospherics in the retail environment and how stores analyse options when planning new store locations.


Number of Contact Hours: 2 x 1 hour lectures; 1 x 2 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Retail Marketing Report (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MARI009

This course will cover a number of sales management topics such as sales motivation, sales and revenue forecasts, and evaluation of sales performance. It will also examine the various approaches to personal selling and sales pitches.

Number of Contact hours: 2 x 1 hour lecturers; 1 x 2 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Sales Report (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ACFC001

The magic of double entry bookkeeping course aims: Students will gain an understanding of the history and mechanics of double-entry bookkeeping. Students will learn the technical skills required to master the basics of double- entry bookkeeping and preparing financial statements of sole traders.
- Recording basic transactions using double entry bookkeeping
- Closing ledger accounts
- Preparing a Trial Balance
- Reviewing and making simple year-end adjustments
- Preparing key financial statements

Assessment
100%, Prepare simple accounts from transactions using double entry bookkeeping (1,500 words)

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: GEOI021

Course Available both FALL and SPRING

FALL: This course considers selected processes that shape and modify the surface of the Earth, for example, weathering, mass movement. Students will explore and evaluate the diversity of geomorphological and/or biogeographical processes in operation on the Earth particularly with regard to their controlling factors, role in temporal and spatial patterns, and, landform/landscape development (including soil formation). This course may also include non-residential fieldwork.

SPRING: (Synopsis Pending)


Course aims: This course aims to develop students knowledge, understanding and interpretation of selected Earth surface processes (geomorphological and biogeographical processes) and their role in landform and landscape development.

Assessment
50% Coursework- Essay (2,000 words)
50% Coursework - Case study (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EVGC002

This course will explore key events in the geological history of the Earth, the geological evolution of the UK, and significant events that have changed the Earth (for example, Phanerozoic climate change, origins of life on Earth and mass extinctions).

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: TORI003

Course Available both FALL and SPRING.

FALL: (Synopsis pending)
SPRING: This course will examine the increasing move by tourists towards seeking experimental and niche tourism products.

Course aims: To provide a detailed understanding of domestic and international tourism destinations, including an informed understanding of the different forms of new and alternative tourism.

Course learning outcomes:
To provide an informed understanding of the changing nature of tourism and tourists, and the rise in alternate forms of tourism.
To provide a detailed and informed understanding and appreciation of tourism within its wider social, economic and political context.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYI047

Students will cover content related to the principles associated with development across the lifespan, this will include neural development; perceptual, memory and attention; language, literacy and emotion development; development of relationships, understanding perspective, the emergence and development of social cognition; development of prosocial thinking; attachment, bonding and affiliation in childhood, parental alienation and psychopathology; family structure and parenting style; cognitive aging and life events (note the some topics will be delivered after the Easter break)

Assessment
100% Essay (1,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PSYH053

Psychology will change in the coming years in response to the conditions in which people find themselves. Challenges to identity and wellbeing will arise from an aging population, an increasingly globalized and warming world, and the place of people alongside technology. In this series of lectures, we will pick up some important themes explored in the students’ studies and re-examine them in light of forthcoming challenges.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

INTERNATIONAL HUB
STUDY LEVEL:
CREDITS: 0
CODE: BRLZ001

This course provides Study Abroad and Exchange students with an introduction to British Life. Firstly, it will help international students to understand the British Higher Education system and their university experiences. Secondly, it introduces them to different aspects of Liverpool and British society and culture. It is a compulsory course but is non-credit bearing; some partner institutions attach their own credits to it.

The course will include talks and workshops in the first week of the Programme, with off-campus trips relating to the content. Later in the Programme a series of themed weeks will include sessions looking at faith, values and beliefs or academic skills, leading to a poster conference based around self-development, impressions and experiences.

Attendance at all sessions is compulsory.

ASSESSMENT
In order to pass the course students are required to submit a Personal Reflection of their experience in Liverpool - several formats are acceptable.

SCHOOL OF CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ARTH016

Course Available FALL and SPRING

This is a studio-based course, which seeks to encourage you to actively engage in research that will form a continuum of your previously made work and research interests. The study of contemporary and art historical practices within Fine Art will be expected to underpin all students work. You should arrive on the course equipped with images of your previous work and documentation outlining your research interests. The work produced on the course will be guided by regular support and guidance in one-to-one tutorials from studio lecturers. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists. Workshops are available in wood, metal, print, digital media and plaster. These facilities are available to you following a short technical induction. Group critiques with your peers and tutors alongside indicative and self-assessments will support you in developing a personal visual language in full knowledge of the Fine Art field of cultural production. You will keep a contextual journal, which should position your studio practice from an informed and knowledgeable perspective. This document will also evidence your knowledge of the wider Fine Art and cultural perspective. It is a requirement of the course that you actively engage with the vibrant exhibition programmes at Walker Art Gallery, The Bluecoat, FACT and other major art Institutions based in Liverpool. The early stages of your study and practice will be in an experimental format, which will enable you to test out ideas in a studio-based setting. The latter stages of production will realise you working in a more focussed mode towards a resolved body of work. The opportunity to discuss ideas and research with your peers and tutors is available during studio time and in various group critique sessions. The praxis of theoretical research and practical work will test your creativity through a wide range of media and methods before your final Level H Advanced Fine Art submission.

Contextual and Personal Journals and Sketchbooks- The supporting contextual and personal journals with documentation of your engagement with national and international contemporary art are an important part of the course. The journals should include critical reflection regarding at least three of the major museums and galleries based in Liverpool. This journal should outline and critically reflect upon all exhibitions visited and book based or academic journal research. The contextual journal can contain photographs and reproductions of the work of other artists with published text references combined with your own critical and analytical commentary.

The personal journal should contain a record of your methodologies employed within the studio practice as well as links to artists that have informed your practice. The artists documented can be from a contemporary or art historical setting and your written commentary should contain written reflections upon your studio processes and thinking, alongside visual documentation of your work in progress. There is a requirement to critically evaluate the work of related artists and the research should act as a place to reflect and think critically, not as a diary. Sketchbooks will document your initial ideas, musings and general practice.

Assessments
50% Coursework; Advanced Visual Research and Development.
50% Contextual and Personal journals containing visual imagery and written analysis of work from primary and secondary sources.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ARTH017

Course Available FALL and SPRING

This is a studio-based course, which seeks to encourage you to actively engage in research that will form a continuum of your previously made work and research interests. The study of contemporary and art historical practices within Fine Art will be expected to underpin all of the work made within studios. You should arrive on the course equipped with images of your previous work and documentation outlining your research interests. The work produced on the course will be guided by regular support and guidance in one-to-one tutorials from studio lecturers.
All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists. Workshops are available in wood, metal, print, digital media and plaster. These facilities are available to you following a short technical induction. Group critiques with your peers and tutors alongside indicative and self-assessments will support you in developing a personal visual language in full knowledge of the Fine Art field of cultural production.

You will keep a contextual journal, which should position your studio practice from an informed and knowledgeable perspective. This document will also evidence your knowledge of the wider Fine Art and cultural perspective. It is a requirement of the course that you actively engage with the vibrant exhibition programmes at Walker Art Gallery, The Bluecoat, FACT and other major art Institutions based in Liverpool. The contextual journal should include critical reflection regarding at least two of the major museums and galleries based in Liverpool. This journal will outline and critically reflect upon all exhibitions visited and book based or academic journal research. The journal can contain photographs and reproductions of the work of other artists with published text references combined with your own critical and analytical commentary. Sketchbooks will document your initial ideas, drawings, musings and notes. The early stages of your study and practice will be in an experimental format, which will enable you to test out ideas in a studio-based setting. The latter stages of production will realise you working in a more focused mode towards a resolved body of work. The opportunity to discuss ideas and research with your peers and tutors is available during studio time and in various group critique sessions. The praxis of theoretical research and practical work will test your creativity through a wide range of media and methods before your final Level H Advanced Fine Art submission.

Assessment
100% Advanced Visual Research and Development. Coursework including Contextual Journal.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: DESH027

Course Available FALL and SPRING.

Innovation and creativity underpins this advanced year of study where students will theorise their own approaches to study within the material areas of Textiles, Metal and Ceramics. The year is comprised of planning and negotiating an independent project towards a body of work supported by ongoing advanced technical workshops and relevant market research. The application of materials and process is harnessed through ongoing testing and technical exploration.
The course at Level H consolidates robust understanding of the theoretical and practical principles of Design and Contemporary Crafts by enacting students’ knowledge in the formation of a high quality professional body of work and accompanying research. The research promotes contemporary, critical and historical awareness to inform studio development underpinned by the production of a detailed contextual journal and associated sketchbooks.

75% Portfolio and Samples (minimum 20 portfolio sheets)
25% Contextual Journal and Sketchbook (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DESH026

Course available Fall and Spring:

Innovation and creativity underpins this advanced year of study where students will respond to independent briefs and theorise their own approaches to study within the material areas of Textiles, Metal and Ceramics.
The year is comprised of planning and negotiating an independent project towards a body of work which is supported by advanced technical workshops and market research. The application and experimentation of materials and process are harnessed through ongoing testing and technical exploration.
Practice informed research promotes contemporary, critical and historical awareness to support studio development and is refenced through the production of a detailed contextual journal and associated sketchbooks.

75% Portfolio & Samples (minimum 10 portfolio sheets)
25% Contextual Journal & Sketchbook (1,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DMAH003

The student will study Applied Theatre as a discipline and all the forms of practice that falls under that heading. They will acquire the skills to design, deliver and evaluate a series of bespoke workshops for a chosen constituency group. In semester one they will set up their own theatre company focusing on elements such as marketing, budgeting, ethics, workshop planning, group dynamics, etc. They will also research into the specific requirements of their chosen constituency group and formulate a practice referencing and taking influence from established models in the field. In both semesters they will learn facilitation skills, and in Semester 2 have the opportunity to run a workshop off-campus with their chosen community group (for example, schools, youth centres, nursing homes, prison, etc.)

Assessment
Workshop design and delivery, followed by a viva (45 min work-shop, 15min Viva)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ADHC019

Course available Fall or Spring.

This element considers the diversity of practices and approaches in modern and contemporary visual practices, and the ways in which these are situated within a historical tradition of creative practice. The past is only ever accessed through the present; history is made by our interpretation of the traces left by those who lived before us, seen through contemporary eyes. Similarly, in negotiating the contemporary world, we consciously or unconsciously build on our understanding of what has gone before. This element takes a thematic approach to contemporary practice, with a focus on the complex and diverse relationships between past and present in art, architecture and design. It includes contributions from practitioners and historians, comprising both classroom-based lectures and seminars, interactive tasks investigations and study visits.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DANI013

Course Available FALL and SPRING

REASONABLE LEVEL OF FITNESS REQUIRED

FALL : This 15 credit study abroad course offers visiting students the opportunity to develop dance practices based around digital media and screen based dance. Screen-based dance locates the body and site through the frame of media based technologies, video cameras, and also immediate technologies such as mobile phones. The student will develop their understanding of choreography and composition through practical sessions delivered throughout the course and will explore issues that emerge in the interface of live and digitised dance performance, such as representation, mediatisation and the role of the audience.
Accompanying your explorations in practical dance making, a lecture series will reflect on how both current and historic makers may respond to social, political and cultural climates to adapt their individual choreographic approaches and styles.

SPRING: This 15 credit study abroad course offers visiting students will focus on dance from a postmodern context, looking at current influential choreographers across the globe whose work challenges definitions of the dancing body in today’s society. We will explore choreographers whose work fuses different techniques and cultural styles, exploring definitions of fusion and hybridity in dance to look at areas of cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural practice. You will undertake a short placement with a professional dance organisation which will be mentored by your tutors.

Assessments

FALL:
50% Group Performance (10 minutes)
50% Essay(3000 words equivalent)

SPRING:
Placement report (10minutes) 50%
Presentation (3000 words equivalent) 50%

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: DANI026

GOOD LEVEL OF FITNESS REQUIRED

This 30 credit study abroad course offers visiting students the opportunity to develop dance practices based around digital media and screen based dance. Screen-based dance locates the body and site through the frame of media based technologies, video cameras, and also immediate technologies such as mobile phones. The student will develop their understanding of choreography and composition through practical sessions delivered throughout the course and will explore issues that emerge in the interface of live and digitised dance performance, such as representation, mediatisation and the role of the audience.

Accompanying your explorations in practical dance making, a lecture series will reflect on how both current and historic makers may respond to social, political and cultural climates to adapt their individual choreographic approaches and styles.


Assessment
50% Essay (3,000 words equivalent)
50% Group Performance (25 minutes)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ARTI024

Course Available Fall and SPRING
This course of study is initially project-led with you being encouraged and guided by tutors towards an eventual self-directed thematic choice and area of study within contemporary Fine Art. The first project is an engaging and broad-based brief, which is open to a wide scope of interpretation and is intended to serve as a starting point for the forming of a student-led thematic approach to practice. There is scope for experimentation with methods and materials in order to aid the development of a personal visual language.

You will be encouraged to establish and develop an autonomous method of inquiry and practice. Activities will include the visual research of ideas and methodologies in a choice of either painting, sculpture, print, drawing, photography, video or any other relevant media. There is a requirement to research both contemporary and historical Fine Art practice which will be documented in a contextual journal format. The contextual journal serves to record and critically reflect upon your progress and cultural experiences. This journal should also record the evaluation of gallery visits within Liverpool using the major art institutions based in Liverpool such as The Walker Art Gallery, Bluecoat, FACT and The Lady Lever Gallery.

Both the contextual research and practice-based aspects of the course are guided by regular contact time with specialist tutors of the related disciplines. A sketchbook should be produced and this forms the documentation and testing out of ideas, processes and studio development. Inductions are offered in areas such as wood, metal, print, plaster and laser cutting. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing from a life model is an optional activity for all students. You will be supported by tutors in the development of an informed practical and theoretical stance in relation to Fine Art practice. All tutors on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Assessment
50% Portfolio of developmental drawings, experimentation with materials and processes with outcomes in 2D/3D dimensions with supporting contextual 50% Supporting journals and sketchbooks, equivalent to 30 credits worth of study.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ARTI025

This course begins with a studio based drawing project and extends into a range of options to develop ideas in two and/or three dimensions.
Students are encouraged to develop a personal line of enquiry through writing an independent project brief
with support from studio lecturers who are experts across a range of disciplines including painting, printing, sculpture, installation and digital media.
International students who take a Fine Art course at this level often use the city of Liverpool, its architecture, geographic location and cultural venues to inform their studio work.
Students keep a sketchbook, contextual journal and personal journal to record and critically reflect upon their progress and cultural experiences.
Making skills are developed through access to a range of materials and processes including print, painting,
sculpture, installation and digital media, supported by skilled technicians.
Studio lecturers provide regular tutorial support to assist with the development of ideas along with peer/group critiques and presentations.
Delivery is via 1 x 3 hour Studio session and 1 x 1 hour small group Tutorial.

Assessment
100% Coursework : A portfolio of drawings along with evidence of visual and media experimentation, supported by work in sketchbooks.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: FVCH001

This Study Abroad course offers an advanced perspective on global cinemas after the 1950s. We will address representations of identity in relation to advanced key concepts in film studies, considering European, Arab, Latin American, and Asian cinemas after the 1950s. There will be an added focus on the relationship between representations of gender, sexuality, and social issues, and the socio-political context in which cinema becomes a national (and often transnational) cultural form.

Course structure: 2 x 1 hour lectures, 1 x 2 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
80% Essay in Global Cinemas (4,000 words)
20% Seminar Work (1,000 equivalent)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: ARTC007

Course Available FALL and SPRING.

This is a project-led course. The projects draw on a choice of activities which include painting, sculpture, installation, sound and collage. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing sessions which look at differing approaches to drawing are offered to study abroad students. There is a requirement to research both contemporary and historical Fine Art practice which will be documented in a contextual journal format. This journal would also record the evaluation of study and gallery visits undertaken within Liverpool or other venues in the UK. There is scope within this course for experimentation with a range of materials and processes in order for experiential learning to contribute to the forming of a personal visual language. Both the contextual research and practice-based aspects of the course are guided by regular contact time with specialist tutors of the related disciplines. A sketchbook will be produced and this forms the documentation and testing out of ideas, processes and studio development. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Assessment
50% A portfolio of project-led drawings with evidence of material experimentation and outcomes in two and/or three dimensions
50% A Supporting contextual journal and sketchbooks containing visual imagery and written analysis of work from primary and secondary sources equivalent to 30 credits worth of study.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ARTC006

Course Available FALL and SPRING.

FALL and SPRING synopsis:
This is a studio-based and project-led course which leads you through a variety of approaches to contemporary art practice in two and three dimensions. Inductions in the use of workshop equipment allows you to explore your ideas in a variety of media within the disciplines of painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Activities will include the visual research of ideas and methodologies in a choice of either painting, sculpture, print, drawing, photography, video or any other relevant media. An emphasis upon drawing is present from the outset of the course and tutor-led drawing sessions which look at differing approaches to drawing are offered to study abroad students. Contextual research and regular gallery visits to venues in Liverpool provide a broader level of understanding of the subject. The cultural venues in the city offer an exciting learning environment, particularly to international students as Liverpool has more museums and galleries than any other UK city outside of London. You are encouraged to bring examples of your previous work (in photographic form). Course delivery is a three hour studio practical session and a one hour group tutorial each week. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Course delivery is a three hour studio practical session and a one hour group tutorial each week. All lecturers on the course are professional artists and skilled educationalists.

Assessment
100% Coursework -A portfolio of drawings and related experiments in 2D and 3D (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MUSI038

Course Available for FALL and SPRING

Students will study compositional devices in their choice of genre and style. They will be guided to develop their work through the use of extended structures, using given examples to explore new ways to approach the creation of musical forms. Classes will focus on a blend of guided tutor input and individual feedback on the work produced. Students will be able to explore a variety of technology- based approaches using the ‘state of the art’
equipment in the music area.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Two or three original and linked compositions of approximately 15 minutes in duration for 6-8 instruments.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MUSI039

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MUSI040

Students will be guided in the use of a variety of music production equipment.
Students will be guided in the management of producing live and audio sound in a variety of
contexts.
Students will be guided in the production of specific musical projects working closely with
performers and/or technology based provision.

Coursework: Two practical, production projects incorporating live and studio sound of approximately 15 minutes duration.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: FVCI002

This Study Abroad course offers an exploration of major cinematic movements from post-World War II until the 1990s. We will address key moments from selected British, American and European cinemas, from post WWI silent film to sound, with a central focus on the relationship between key aesthetic innovations and the socio-political context in which films existed. Areas covered in this course will include the British and French New Waves, British and American film of the 1960s and 1970s and filmmaking during Thatcher’s Britain.

Course structure: 1 Lecture, 1 Seminar and 1 tutorial a week.

Assessment
85% Essay on Cinema and Social comment (2,500 words)
15% Tutorial Work (500 equivalent)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ADHC012

Course Available both FALL and SPRING.
This course will be the first part of our thematic overview, starting in Antiquity and moving up to Renaissance Art at
the end of the 15th century.

Course aims:
1) An introduction to the history of art and design
2) The necessary critical skills of reading, interpretation and writing for art and design history
3) An understanding of the role played by place and location, in the production of art and design
4) An understanding of art and design as social production, related to social and historical contexts

The course structure will consists of two lectures and one seminar per week.
For more information, please contact the course tutor on wagnerk@hope.ac.uk

Assessment
Essay (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DMAI002

Course Available FALL and SPRING

This course invites learners to explore some of the major theories that inform the study and practice of theatre and performance, through focused discussion of a series of key topics in contemporary arts and society. These may (indicatively) include disability, ecology, race, family, gender and feminism identity - and more.

Course structure is a mix of lectures, seminar and tutorials.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAI021

Citizenship education plays an increasingly important role in the modern world and helps to educate responsible critical-thinkers who are able to participate effectively in a democratic community. In this 3-week course, you will have the opportunity to focus on citizenship education in a broad perspective and understand its influence in the wider learning community, particularly in relation to European, Global and multicultural contexts. Beginning with a field trip to the People's Museum of Justice and the re-enactment of a trial at Manchester Crown Court where you will take on roles such as judge, jury, barrister, witness and defense, you will be able to reflect on the value of citizenship within the wider, learning community.

The course then goes on to consider global citizenship education to help explore the benefits and limitations of existing international approaches. With reference to social psychology theory, the course then explores socialisation, social identities and stereotypes to understand how these contribute to ideas of community and belonging. After studying this block, you will be better equipped to understand the opportunities and challenges that affect the educational practice of citizenship lessons and how these may be affected in the future.

Assessment
100% Coursework (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EACC009

Students will explore aspects of child development and attachment theory. They will explore developmental theories and concepts and the role of play. Students will develop the ability to plan for effective provision for children and families. Students will begin to acquire subject specific skills at this level which match the ECS benchmarks. For instance, they will be able to see multiple perspectives in relation to early childhood and start to analyse the relationship between them.
Key topics may include: child development; play; The role of the key person

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage


Assessment

100% E-Portfolio: Portfolio of reflective engagement in Early Childhood (2000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAC012

This course brings together abstract political philosophy with concrete social justice problems. Students learn about what social justice means from the perspective of key thinkers in the past and present such as John Rawls, Michael Oakeshott, and Emma Smith. Students consider why a socially just society is necessary for the happiness of all. Students also consider a range of groups in Britain for whom greater social justice is required in education in order to prevent discrimination and increase education quality.

A different group is considered most weeks and includes groups such as those in poverty, the LGBT community, refugees, the disabled, and those in pre-school. For some of these communities, greater equality is needed, this means that their experiences and history need to be included in curricula alongside the experiences of white males who have dominated in the past. It also means that they need to be as free from discrimination as any other social groups in the class-room. However, for other groups, social justice requires an element of equity – that means giving them more than/something different to others in order to equalise their opportunity. This might involve wealth re-distribution for the poor, special class-support for refugees or those with SEN, trauma-care for refugees, or a flexible, rather than fixed, curriculum for pre-school children who have different needs than the over 4’s.

This course will give students an insight into the moral obligations of the educator to improve social justice in order to reduce suffering and inequality in society, and to create a richer educational experience for all. It will also draw attention to some social justice problems, such as the refugee crisis, for which British educators’ solutions may only be partial.

Assessment
100% Coursework (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: EACI015

This course supports you to closely examine the educational, cultural, psychological and social theories of learning. You will be provided with the opportunity to explore various theories that seek to explain children’s learning and thus you will be provided with the opportunity to develop investigative, explorative and problem- solving skills. You will use your developing knowledge as a basis to critique policy guidelines and practice in the UK and internationally. Key topics of the course may include: Key Learning Theorists; effective ways of learning; Researching Children; International approaches to early childhood education and care.
Delivery Pattern- Lectures, Seminars and Tutorials

• No. of Contact Hours - 5 hrs/week
• Students with some prior knowledge of learning theory will be able to engage in this course more effectively than if they have not studied this aspect previously.
• ECS at Liverpool Hope University is an interdisciplinary subject. It incorporates the psychology, history, sociology and philosophy of education as well as the health, social policy, law, politics and economics of early childhood.
• ECS aims to produce an understanding of the ecology of early childhood, encompassing time and geographical space, and family contexts.
• ECS situates children in the lives and practices of families, societies and cultures that proceed and succeed them.
• ECS studies the changing nature of the concept of childhood, ethical principles and children’s rights.
Students will learn about pedagogy and professionalism required for those working in settings or services that engage with children and families. Throughout the course students will develop knowledge and understanding of the


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage

Assessment

100% E-Portfolio: Portfolio of reflective engagement in Early Childhood

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 30
CODE: EACC011

Delivery Pattern- Lectures, Seminars and Tutorials

Students will begin to look at all aspects of children’s development which will draw on health, social and psychological disciplines.
Attachment theory and the importance of the strong emotional and physical bond of affection to primary and secondary caregivers will explored. Furthermore, links will be made with the role of play. There is an exploration of the role for the key person, the challenges of this role and ways to promote positive relationships in early years.
Students will begin to acquire subject specific skills at this level which match the ECS benchmarks. For instance, they will be able to see multiple perspectives in relation to early childhood and start to analyse the relationship between them. In this term, the reflective approach is developed in relation to attachment theory, and the child’s holistic development and learning.

Key topics may include: Holistic development; Attachment theory; The role of the key person; Play
• No. of Contact Hours - 6 hrs/week
• ECS at Liverpool Hope University is an interdisciplinary subject. It incorporates the psychology, history, sociology and philosophy of education as well as the health, social policy, law, politics and economics of early childhood.
• ECS aims to produce an understanding of the ecology of early childhood, encompassing time and geographical space, and family contexts.
• ECS situates children in the lives and practices of families, societies and cultures that proceed and succeed them.
• ECS studies the changing nature of the concept of childhood, ethical principles and children’s rights.

Students will learn about pedagogy and professionalism required for those working in settings or services that engage with children and families. Throughout the course students will develop knowledge and understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of studying children in context.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage

Assessment

100% Reflective Portfolio (4,000 words) Submission: March

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EACI013

Students will go through learning theories that explain how young children learn effectively. Theorists from constructivism, social constructivism and behaviourism are explored and students will use their developing knowledge to make connections between, culture and learning, barriers to learning, aspects of learning and development. Critical awareness of policy guidelines and practice in the UK and internationally are applied.
Key topics include: classical and contemporary learning theories; personal characteristics and socio-cultural influences on learning; national and international provision
Delivery Pattern- Lectures, Seminars and Tutorials


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Special Features of the provision
• Early Childhood Studies provides breadth of knowledge and understanding in the field of young children and families. Its interdisciplinary nature and possible application to many curriculum areas, makes it a suitable subject for students who are interested in young children.
• There are many aspects of work with children and families that graduates could pursue, depending on their combined study and interests. Examples include social therapy, music therapy, mental health, family support work, charity, local authority work, child and family health, special educational needs and advocacy.

Indicative Reading:
- Powell, S. and Smith K. (2017). An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies (4TH ed).
London: Sage

Assessment

100% E Portfolio

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAI020

Politics, Economics and Educational Research connects trends in educational policy over the past 30 years with wider trends in public policy, and explores the implications for educational research, measurement and impact. Beginning with an understanding of the fundamentals of public choice economics and their influence on contemporary education policy and practice in the UK, the course goes on to explore the impacts of choice and measurement for governance of education. With reference to key policy reports on educational research, the course helps students understand the benefits and limitations of measures of efficacy designed for a public choice environment. If you are interested in the role of politics and economics on education, or how to design valid and rigorous research within a culture of measurement, then you will find this course both provides those skills, and raises deeper questions about the limitations of measurement. After studying this course, you will be able to understand the impact of measurement and metrics on educational research and practice. It will also help you to consider your own positioning in the 'marketplace' in which educators increasingly find themselves.

Assessment
100% Coursework (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: PRQI001

Available for Fall and Spring terms.
The curriculum specialist course has been designed by lead practitioners to support those with a passion and interest in developing innovative curriculum pedagogies and leadership within the primary school.
This course encourages you to shape your values and attitudes in order to develop you as an effective primary school curriculum leader. It supports students to explore the broad concept of primary curriculum leadership both nationally and globally. What it is to be a primary school curriculum leader today is investigated and the implications of this experience are debated. This course covers significant pedagogical principles of the primary national curriculum and how it can be interpreted in a variety of settings.

Students will have the opportunity to choose from one of seven primary specialist areas including; English, Maths, Science, Special Educational Needs, Early Years, Physical Education and Modern Foreign Languages.
This course also offers opportunities to work with primary school curriculum leaders reviewing and evaluating current practice in the classroom.
Professional Placement Block ( up to four weeks according to availability )
Students will be able to complete up to four weeks block placement in a partnership school setting. This professional placement will be in a primary school and will enable students to enact their learning from their taught block. Professional mentors will support your training in school and university tutors will support and quality assure you placement.

Assessment
50% Portfolio of reflective engagement in the Primary Curriculum (2,000 words)
50% Reflective Essay on the pedagogical principles of curriculum design (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: EDAC011

This course explores different disciplinary perspectives in education policy, including Philosophy, Psychology, and History, as well as examining trends in policy making around topics such as the knowledge economy, diversity and inclusion, and early years and families. We will consider a range of policy problems and solutions from literacy in the 19th Century to current approaches around parenting, truancy and absenteeism, tuition fees, and positive discrimination. This course offers an exciting window into understanding the education system and the broader society within which they operate – and which they influence. Our emphasis is on the different perspectives – both political and practical – that face the people and organisations who influence and make policy, as well those who put it into practice, from local governments to teachers and parents. As we will see, policies are invariably imperfect in that the issues they are seeking to address are complex and cannot be solved by education alone. This course also includes a supported debate where the class is divided into two groups who are expected to promote and defend a particular position around how policies are implemented.

The intention is to help you to develop a critical understanding of policy and education policy in particular. The focus is largely on UK policies but there will also be some focus on international contexts. Also, many of the issues we will be considering are part of discussions around education in most countries, and it is the solutions that differ, influenced through the particular national combination of a given country’s cultural, economic and political conditions.

Assessment
100% Coursework (2,000 words )

SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND SPORT SCIENCES
STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: HSSI003

This module examines the application of principles of Sport Science to evaluate, promote and optimise sports performance and exercise for health. Optimisation of sports performance is examined by understanding of training programme design such as the study of training periodisation, quantification of training load, athlete monitoring and programming training for specific performance requirements. The objective analysis of training load is supported by exploring the analysis of sport performance via notational and qualitative means. Moreover, aspects of physical activity and health are directly examined by applying knowledge of physical activity to key inactive communities and understanding the role that health promotion plays in improving population health through exercise. Evidence-based research is utilised to evaluate the role of health promotion policy on physical activity, with reference made to specific community groups and environments in the context of their physical activity profile and specific physiology and pathophysiology.

The emphasis of this module, from sports performance to exercise and health, may change between years. Hence, interested students should contact the School of Health Sciences in advance to find out the intended aspects of study for the coming year.

This module includes fieldwork (in Strength & Conditioning and other fitness parameters) and also dedicated IT work for data analysis.

Assessment
50% Case Study (3,000 words)
50% Scientific Report (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: NUTH009

With a focus on Food Science, this course encompasses a range of key topic areas to be delivered through lecturers including food technology, food safety, food processing, the quality assurance of food, and the food product development cycle (including the importance of the sensory evaluation of foods). In addition to lectures, a series of laboratory and other practical sessions will underpin some of the theoretical perspectives mentioned above. Students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on practice in analysing and assessing the quality of foods, as well as gaining experience of developing food products to understand the importance of food product development within the Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Course Structure: 2 x Lectures, 1 x seminar and 1 x tutorial per week.

Assessment
75% Report (2,000 words)
25% Presentation (20 minutes)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 30
CODE: NUTH010

Within this course, food supply, sustainability and formulation will be discussed and food choice, behaviour modification of food intake and principles of nutrition education will also be considered. The course finishes with a focus on the profession of nutrition including considerations of careers in nutrition together with ethical code of conduct in nutrition.

Course structure: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 x 2 hour seminar and 1 x 1 hour tutorial.

Assessment
75% Essay (2,000 words)
25% Presentation (20 minutes)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SPHI003

This module examines the fundamentals of coaching science and teaching physical education, ranging from studying the principles of training and applied physiology, to the impact of government policy on the development of the National Curriculum. You will be introduced to a range of events through the practical sessions to allow you to develop an understanding of what makes an effective coaching session. The module will be taught via weekly lectures, supported by weekly tutorials to consolidate your understanding and further develop your knowledge on the lecture content. Seminars will take a more interactive approach focusing on practical sessions across a number of events, with the opportunity to conduct the coaching of an event as part of the assessment.

Assessment:
Case study essay: Sport Coaching - 2,000 words (50%)
Athletics coaching practical delivery - 1,000 words equivalent (50%)

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: INRH003

Topics will be drawn from a range that may include;
- Power and resistance,
- Security and Securitisation,
- Discourse analysis,
- Participation and Politics,
- Research and Power,
- Ethical challenges.

Assessment
100% Coursework - Essay, analysing concepts in internal relations (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PLII024

The course aims to provide students with a strong understanding of the theory and practice of democrastisation. It considers the challenges of developing democracy in a number of comparative settings, including the United States, Europe and Latin America.

Assessment
100% Coursework- Challenges of Democracy essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: THOI001

This course examines theological responses to challenges facing Christianity with the rise of modernity. In particular, the course will focus on theological engagement with the Enlightenment and the apparent tensions between Faith and Reason. Students will examine such themes as arguments for the existence of God, the turn to Romanticism, the Atheism controversies, the Jesus of History/Christ of Faith debate, and the apparent conflicts between Science, Philosophy, and Religion.

Course structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: HISC005

This module will normally begin in the third or fourth week of the second semester. It will explore the nature and impact of the reign of Henry VIII, focusing on the longer-term consequences of the Reformation. It will look at the images of royal power deployed in this period, the debate on the mid Tudor 'crisis', and female monarchs' handling of challenges.

Assessment
100% Coursework Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELII045

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in the careful study of selected canonical Romantic and Victorian literary texts. Lectures will provide information on the historical, intellectual and cultural contexts within which texts were written. In seminars students will have the opportunity to engage in close textual analysis and discussion of key texts of the late eighteenth- to the mid-nineteenth century, and to explore thematic and formal developments against the historical backdrop of the era. Emphasis will be placed on how political reform in Britain and abroad became a central thematic concern in literature of the era with a particular focus on innovations in literary form and concerns with the role of a readership that was acquiring increasing political power.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSI003

This course provides a broad and deep introduction to Buddhism. To do so it will explore the following topics: The Buddha, The Four Noble Truths, No-Self, Liberation, Schisms and Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana, Emptiness, and finally Zen.

Course Structure: 1 x Lecture and 1 x Seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELIC017

While this course can change year to year, the course focuses on drama in relation to historical developments and different critical perspectives from a range of different time periods up to the present day. The seminars are supported by a lecture strand that focuses on these same texts, providing students with background information and historical context, suggesting ways that such information can be used to enrich their reading. Students are also challenged to consider a range of critical perspectives and the implications that their application would have on the interpretation of the texts studied, suggesting how different critical perspectives highlight some areas of a text while minimising the importance or visibility of others.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSC002

This course will introduce students to Judaism in its rich and varied traditions and history. The topics covered in the course include: Sacred and Other Authoritative Writings (the Hebrew Bible, the Mishnah and the Talmud); Jewish Law and Life: Halakhah and Aggadah; Calendar, Festivals, and Rituals; Anti-semitism and the Holocaust; Zionism and the State of Israel.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELIC018

While this course can change year to year, the course focuses on prose fiction in relation to historical developments and different critical perspectives from a range of different time periods up to the present day. The seminars are supported by a lecture strand that focuses on these same texts, providing students with background information and historical context, suggesting ways that such information can be used to enrich their reading. Students are also challenged to consider a range of critical perspectives and the implications that their application would have on the interpretation of the texts studied, suggesting how different critical perspectives highlight some areas of a text while minimising the importance or visibility of others.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELIC019

As well as developing core critical skills, this course introduces students to a comparative approach to literature and will provide students with the opportunity to think about how the literary canon has developed into the texts that we study and read today. While the texts chosen for this course can change year to year, in the past the course has introduced a range of literary texts from Ancient Greece to the present day with a particular emphasis upon Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. The seminars are supported by a lecture strand that focuses on these same texts, providing students with background information and historical context.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELIC020

As well as developing core critical skills, this course introduces students to a comparative approach to literature and will provide students with the opportunity to think about how the literary canon has developed into the texts that we study and read today. While the texts chosen for this course can change year to year, in the past the course has introduced a range of literary texts from Ancient Greece to the present day with a particular emphasis upon Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. The seminars are supported by a lecture strand that focuses on these same texts, providing students with background information and historical context.

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSH003

We will explore key thinkers and themes in Jewish responses to the holocaust (the Shoah), particularly in relation to the emergence of ‘post-holocaust theology’. In doing so, we will explore the potential relationship between this field and the field of Kabbalah Studies, thereby considering the possible synergies between Jewish mysticism and theological responses to the holocaust.

Course Structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x 1 Seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ENLC008

This course will introduce students to key issues, theories and methods in the study of sociolinguistic variation. Topics include language variation according to social factors such as class, gender, ethnicity and age. It also examines stylistic and discoursal aspects of language use including pragmatics and semantics.
Course Structure: 1 x 1 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELII044

In small tutorial groups, this course focuses upon one Major Author of the literary canon. This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in the careful study of selected texts to enhance an understanding of the historical, intellectual and cultural contexts within which texts were written. In
addition, the course will also provide tutorials about publishing history. In the past the course involved an analysis of both early reviews and recent critical perspectives on the set texts and allowed students to explore publishing practices in historical context from various sources. Also, students examined issues related to the production, publication, and reception of texts, examining the demands of serialised publication and their effects on form and narrative structure, editorial interventions, the reception of instalments as they were published and the subsequent reception of the text under analysis.

Assessment
Two Essay (both 1,500 words) weighted 50% each.

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 30
CODE: HISI034

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ENLC010

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: PHEI011

Incorporating examples from a range of the arts, including: painting, poetry, sculpture, architecture, drama, music and film, and focusing on major themes such as: beauty, inspiration, expression, poetics, symbolism, phenomenology, hermeneutics, and the imagination, this course critically examines the theories and perspectives of key figures and movements within the field of philosophical aesthetics.

Course Structure: 1 x 1 lecture and 1 x 1 Seminar a week.

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: RSSH004

Religion was often held up as a vessel of peace, inner (A protestant emphasis) and social. Given an uneven trend over the centuries toward cultural pluralism and ‘freedom’, modern theorists optimistically concluded that religion would either decline in significance or become a pillar of universalistic culture promoting a form of humanism. So, as a flash point of violence from the past, religion did not warrant attention in the overall narrative of the modern world. YET, such a reading of historical development is far too optimistic, as events of September 11, 2001, all too vividly demonstrate. A moment’s reflection attests that religion and violence are often woven together in history’s tapestries. Any number of religions have justified violence under certain circumstances, and others have become caught up in its processes. The course in the Lent term will look at African and South East Asian contexts to assess the relevance of engaging religion for the coherence of societies and pursuit of peace even when conflict is associated with religious sensitivities.

Course structure: 1 x Lecture and 1 x Seminar a week.

Essay (3,000)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: INRH002

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHTC001

After a number of practical, skill-based and text-oriented introductions to issues around interpretation, canon, and textual transmission during the Wednesday workshops, the Tuesday lectures and seminars will present the students with an overview of the contents of the Christian Bible (both Old and New Testaments) as well introduce some of the interpretative methodologies and the Wednesday textual workshops will enhance the interpretative skills of the students.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Essay or Textual analysis (1,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: ELII046

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in the careful study of literature and society in Britain at the end of the nineteenth century and in the first years of the twentieth. Lectures will provide information on the historical, intellectual and cultural contexts within which texts were written. In seminars students will have the opportunity to engage in close textual analysis and discussion of key texts. Some critics view this as a period of cultural crisis, of the break-up of the Victorian order; others point to efforts in the era to consolidate a sense of identity and stability with a view to continued progress. In this course, then, we will look at a variety of texts in relation to contemporary issues and consider the exact nature of the fin de siècle ‘crisis’ and we will discuss Irish and Anglo-Irish literature alongside British literature. Topics to be covered will include empire, gender and degeneration

Assessment
80% Essay (2,000 words)
20% Analysis (500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHTC003

This course offers a systematic introduction to early Christian theology and practices. It focuses on the great historical figures, major controversies and other important events from the first Christian centuries until the Council of Chalcedon (451).

Assessment
100% Essay (2,500 words)

SCHOOL OF LAW
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: LAWH010

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: LAWI013

The Business Law course explores a wide range of areas relating to the formation and regulation of a variety of business models such as partnerships and companies; the management, administration and financing of companies and the legal implications for companies in difficulty or in crisis. The course is designed to encourage the evaluation and analysis of ethical and governance issues affecting businesses in the light of the expectations of the modern world. The course also provides an opportunity to study the theory and practice of Partnership and Company Law in relation to the demands currently placed upon managers and operatives.

The course is divided into two distinct parts.
(i) The Law relating to Sole Traders and Partnerships – which explores, inter alia, legal and ethical duties as between those engaged in a business partnership, together with their powers and responsibilities;
(ii) Company Law (including corporate finance and governance) - where the roles and responsibility of those who direct and manage the affairs of companies is examined. An important part of this area is a critical examination of the area of corporate responsibility. The theme also offers a brief opportunity to explore the moral and philosophical role of markets and morality, business ethics and corporate citizenship.
Relevant legislation and case law will be studied but emphasis will be placed upon a practical approach to problem solving and decision-making in a legal and practical context.

Couse Structure: 1 x Lecture and 1 x Seminar a week.

Assessment
20% In-Class Test (1 hour)
80% Coursework Essay / Answer to Problem question (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: LAWH011

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MATH010

The student will choose two of the following topics.
1. Calculus of Variations – variational problems; functionals; variational derivative; Euler-Lagrange equation; examples of variational problems including the brachistochrone, catenary, surface of revolution.
2. Integrable Systems – Symmetries of differential equations, Lie symmetries for ordinary differential equations and how to find them, using symmetries and construction of solutions.
3. Metric Spaces and Topology – Review of concepts from analysis, metric spaces, product metric, open and closed sets, equivalence of metric spaces, continuity, Cauchy sequences, point set topology, Hausdorff spaces.
4. Symmetries, Group & Conservation Laws –Symmetries, groups and conservation laws - Passive and active transformations, translations, rotations, equations of motions, conserved quantities, Euler-Lagrange, Noether theorem.

The aim of the course is to give the student a deeper understanding of some of the many topics within mathematics and to develop their knowledge further of the pure and applied side of mathematics. The course is designed to give the student the opportunity to choose from a list of four topics, and will enhance their appreciation of the depth of mathematics. They will also be introduced to modern topics such as data analysis and special relativity where they will be able to develop and apply their mathematics skills.

Assessment
100% Coursework

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MATC010

With statistics and probability playing an ever important role in society, this course aims to provide students with the fundamentals of probability and statistics, using MATLAB as a tool for statistics. The student will also learn about how to communicate their mathematics to a wider audience through our mathematical communication course.

Probability – Venn diagrams, axioms of probability, independent events, conditional probability, Baye’s theorem, law of total probability

Statistics – categorical data; quantitative data; normal models; distributions.

MATLAB – introduction to Matlab; dealing with vectors and matrices; plotting; data analysis and the statistical toolbox

Assessment
50% Coursework: Probability and Mathematics Communications
50% Coursework: Statistics and MATLAB

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: MATI011

Multivariable Calculus – concept and properties of a multivariable variable function; partial differentiation and associated rules; gradient fields and basics of vector calculus.

Partial Differential Equations – Introduction to PDEs, first order linear PDEs and the method of characteristics, the Cauchy problem & Periodic functions and Fourier series, separation of variables and the initial/boundary value problems for second order PDEs

Assessment
100% Coursework.

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCSH008

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCSH002

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCSH007

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SCSH003

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: HWBC001

Students will cover a range of contemporary health issues in England. They will consider both the causes of these and the response to them. Furthermore, students will be encouraged think about different approaches to these health problems, considering why some are stigmatised and the implications of this.
Topics will include: addiction; obesity; cancer and HIV.

Course aims:
• Understanding of a range of contemporary health issues in England
• Understanding of the social causes of health issues
• Understanding of stigma around health issues and implications of this

Assessment
100% Essay (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SENC008

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH003

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHYI004

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SENI013

This course will enable you to examine the relationship between disability and education with a particular focus on the role of professional values and professional practice.

You will explore the relationship between professional roles and responsibilities and the potential tensions inherent in the power relationships between disabled children/young people, parents/carers, educators and other professionals.

The importance of voice, advocacy and expectation will be explored during lectures, seminars as well as in small group tutorials where you will also be encouraged to reflect on your academic development including your ability to read, write and think critically. You will have the opportunity to access the university’s extensive collection of texts relating to disability and education in order to extend your understanding of the relationship between disability and education.

Assessment
100% Coursework: Resource Pack (2,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCC008

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: SOCI019

This course examines the key concepts and ideas of sociological thinkers from the contemporary tradition. It places their ideas in social and historical context and assesses the continued relevance of these thinkers in the 21st century.

Course Learning Outcomes:
By the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
- Describe the key contributions of sociological thinkers from the 20th century;
- Evaluate the relevance of sociological thinkers from the contemporary tradition in understanding contemporary social issues;
- Apply the ideas to a range of issues in contemporary society

Assessment

100% Essay (2,500 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH006

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH004

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CRMH009

Course available FALL and SPRING

FALL: (Synopsis Pending)

SPRING: Psychology in the CJS, FBI offender profiling and Investigative psychology, Lie detection and polygraph tests, Eyewitness testimony, Children as witnesses Psychology in rehabilitation and parole
Psychological treatments for sex offenders, Incarcerating the criminally insane Risk Assessment and Recidivism

Assessment
100% Essay (3,000 words)

STUDY LEVEL: Year 2
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHYI002

STUDY LEVEL: Year 3
CREDITS: 15
CODE: DSEH008

STUDY LEVEL: Year 1
CREDITS: 15
CODE: CHYC004