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Criminology

UCAS Code: M990 Duration: 3 years

Overview

Hear from a tutor and student about studying Criminology at Liverpool Hope.

Criminology is a way of studying how crime is socially defined, why some people commit crime, what is the impact of those crimes and what happens to offenders if they are caught. It is also a study of the various processes of law enforcement and criminal justice; in particular, it examines the police and policing, the courts and sentencing and the various forms of punishment.

Criminology enables you to focus on questions such as ‘is criminal behaviour learned or inherited?’ and ‘why are some actions defined as criminal and not others?’; ‘what is the purpose of punishment and to what extent does it deter criminal behaviour?’

Criminology considers these and other issues by examining the relationship between theory, practice and policy; it explores the crimes of the powerful as well as the powerless and does so within a framework of human rights.

Why choose this subject?

  • The taught programme provides a strong academic focus on philosophical and theoretical approaches to understanding crime and criminal justice.
  • 94% of students were satisfied with their personal development and 88% were satisfied overall with Criminology and Social Policy at Liverpool Hope University (National Student Survey 2015).
  • Opportunities are provided for putting theory into practice through work-based learning and applied social research projects available at Level 3.
  • Course staff have a long-established reputation as writers of major texts in the field (including most recently, Crime and Criminal Justice, Routledge 2011).
  • Practitioners in the main areas of criminal justice, including police officers, prison service staff and judges, contribute to the taught course.
  • The dissertation provides an opportunity for undertaking an independent piece of research under the supervision of a research active tutor.
  • Ranked 12th in the UK for their research outputs at 3*/4* with 73.7% of the Unit’s research outputs rated as internationally excellent or world leading. (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

 

Subject Guide

You can read more about studying Criminology at Liverpool Hope in our subject guides. 

Criminology Subject Guide 2017

 

The programme specifications for this subject can be downloaded below.

Criminology

 

This degree is available as a full time course for all international students. For more information about International students studying at Liverpool Hope, visit www.hope.ac.uk/international

Curriculum

Level 1

 

For half of your time you will study the introductory course Foundations in Criminology, which provides a complete overview of the discipline and its various aspects such as the theories used to explain crime, the factors involved in crime (gender, ethnicity, youth), the ways in which we deal with offending, the impact of globalisation, etc.  You will also take one other course: in social and criminal justice policy if following a Single Honours Criminology degree; or as part of your second subject if following a Combined Honours degree.

Level 2

 

In second year the course provides a detailed exploration of the various theoretical approaches used to explain crime, deviance and punishment; an analysis of why people commit crime, examining such issues as the relationship between mental health and offending; the major contemporary problems in crime and justice – terrorism, cyber-crime, organised crime and the like; and the methods used to study crime, its effects and the ways it is dealt with.

Level 3

 

At this level various key issues in criminology are examined in depth: the various ways in which we deal with offenders from out-of-court penalties, to community sentences and imprisonment; media representation of crime and the effects of this; the significance of psychology in understanding crime and how it is dealt with; and globalisation and its impact on crime and justice.

 

Across the three levels of the degree course you will be assessed in a variety of ways; written work in the form of essays and reports, examinations, presentations and finally in Year 3 an extended piece of work for your dissertation or project based on your own supervised research.

 

You may also be interested in...

Law

Law LLB

Psychology

Social Policy

Sociology

 

Entry Requirements

2017 Entry Requirements

The offer level for 2017 entry will be BCC - ABB at A Level or DMM - DDM at BTEC Extended Diploma or 104 - 128 new UCAS tariff points.

In addition, qualifications must include GCSE Mathematics at grade C (Grade 4 or above in the new grading system) or above (or equivalent).

UCAS points offers can be achieved in many ways, the following are just a few examples of how you could achieve our entry requirements:

  • Three A Levels with grades of BCC or above
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF) with grade DMM
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF) with grade M
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and A Level with grade of C
  • CACHE Diploma at grade B

The Access to HE Diploma now also attracts points under the new UCAS tariff. Visit the UCAS website to calculate your points.

 

Useful Links

How to apply

Admissions Policy

UCAS

Course Combinations

Criminology is available as a BA Single Honours degree, UCAS code M990

It can be studied as a combined honours degree with the following subjects:

Criminology and Computer Science  UCAS code LI31
Criminology and Creative Writing  UCAS code C378
Criminology and Early Childhood UCAS code LL39
Criminology and Education  UCAS code LX31
Criminology and English Language UCAS code LQ3H
Criminology and Film & Visual Culture  UCAS code C467
Criminology and International Relations UCAS code LL3G
Criminology and Media & Communication UCAS code LP3H
Criminology and Philosophy & Ethics UCAS code LV53
Criminology and Politics UCAS code LL2H
Criminology and Psychology UCAS code LC38
Criminology and Social Policy  UCAS code ML94
Criminology and Sociology  UCAS code LL31

All course combinations result in a BA Hons degree.

Employability

As a graduate in Criminology, you will have a firm grounding for entry to a range of criminal justice and related careers.

While the police, prison and probation services are the most obvious career paths, the knowledge, awareness and experience of studying Criminology is valuable in a range of related services, as are the capacities for imaginative and critical thinking that are developed throughout the degree programme.  For example, some of our recent graduates have gone on to work in the following fields….

The police, probation service and charitable organisations, as well as a range of careers in both the public and private sector.  Furthermore a number of our students have gone on to further study at both MA and Doctoral Level.  Some graduates find that they wish to continue their studies through completion of Master’s level study, such as on our MA Criminology programme with the intention of developing further understanding of the field and additional employability skills.  Alternatively, some graduates will use their degree as a stepping stone to pursue more formal legal training with the intention of developing a career in the legal profession.

Overview

Hear from a tutor and student about studying Criminology at Liverpool Hope.

Criminology is a way of studying how crime is socially defined, why some people commit crime, what is the impact of those crimes and what happens to offenders if they are caught. It is also a study of the various processes of law enforcement and criminal justice; in particular, it examines the police and policing, the courts and sentencing and the various forms of punishment.

Criminology enables you to focus on questions such as ‘is criminal behaviour learned or inherited?’ and ‘why are some actions defined as criminal and not others?’; ‘what is the purpose of punishment and to what extent does it deter criminal behaviour?’

Criminology considers these and other issues by examining the relationship between theory, practice and policy; it explores the crimes of the powerful as well as the powerless and does so within a framework of human rights.

Why choose this subject?

  • The taught programme provides a strong academic focus on philosophical and theoretical approaches to understanding crime and criminal justice.
  • 94% of students were satisfied with their personal development and 88% were satisfied overall with Criminology and Social Policy at Liverpool Hope University (National Student Survey 2015).
  • Opportunities are provided for putting theory into practice through work-based learning and applied social research projects available at Level 3.
  • Course staff have a long-established reputation as writers of major texts in the field (including most recently, Crime and Criminal Justice, Routledge 2011).
  • Practitioners in the main areas of criminal justice, including police officers, prison service staff and judges, contribute to the taught course.
  • The dissertation provides an opportunity for undertaking an independent piece of research under the supervision of a research active tutor.
  • Ranked 12th in the UK for their research outputs at 3*/4* with 73.7% of the Unit’s research outputs rated as internationally excellent or world leading. (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

 

Subject Guide

You can read more about studying Criminology at Liverpool Hope in our subject guides. 

Criminology Subject Guide 2017

 

The programme specifications for this subject can be downloaded below.

Criminology

 

This degree is available as a full time course for all international students. For more information about International students studying at Liverpool Hope, visit www.hope.ac.uk/international

Curriculum

Level 1

 

For half of your time you will study the introductory course Foundations in Criminology, which provides a complete overview of the discipline and its various aspects such as the theories used to explain crime, the factors involved in crime (gender, ethnicity, youth), the ways in which we deal with offending, the impact of globalisation, etc.  You will also take one other course: in social and criminal justice policy if following a Single Honours Criminology degree; or as part of your second subject if following a Combined Honours degree.

Level 2

 

In second year the course provides a detailed exploration of the various theoretical approaches used to explain crime, deviance and punishment; an analysis of why people commit crime, examining such issues as the relationship between mental health and offending; the major contemporary problems in crime and justice – terrorism, cyber-crime, organised crime and the like; and the methods used to study crime, its effects and the ways it is dealt with.

Level 3

 

At this level various key issues in criminology are examined in depth: the various ways in which we deal with offenders from out-of-court penalties, to community sentences and imprisonment; media representation of crime and the effects of this; the significance of psychology in understanding crime and how it is dealt with; and globalisation and its impact on crime and justice.

 

Across the three levels of the degree course you will be assessed in a variety of ways; written work in the form of essays and reports, examinations, presentations and finally in Year 3 an extended piece of work for your dissertation or project based on your own supervised research.

 

You may also be interested in...

Law

Law LLB

Psychology

Social Policy

Sociology

 

Entry Requirements

2017 Entry Requirements

The offer level for 2017 entry will be BCC - ABB at A Level or DMM - DDM at BTEC Extended Diploma or 104 - 128 new UCAS tariff points.

In addition, qualifications must include GCSE Mathematics at grade C (Grade 4 or above in the new grading system) or above (or equivalent).

UCAS points offers can be achieved in many ways, the following are just a few examples of how you could achieve our entry requirements:

  • Three A Levels with grades of BCC or above
  • BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF) with grade DMM
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF) with grade M
  • BTEC Diploma (QCF) with grade DM and A Level with grade of C
  • CACHE Diploma at grade B

The Access to HE Diploma now also attracts points under the new UCAS tariff. Visit the UCAS website to calculate your points.

 

Useful Links

How to apply

Admissions Policy

UCAS

Course Combinations

Criminology is available as a BA Single Honours degree, UCAS code M990

It can be studied as a combined honours degree with the following subjects:

Criminology and Computer Science  UCAS code LI31
Criminology and Creative Writing  UCAS code C378
Criminology and Early Childhood UCAS code LL39
Criminology and Education  UCAS code LX31
Criminology and English Language UCAS code LQ3H
Criminology and Film & Visual Culture  UCAS code C467
Criminology and International Relations UCAS code LL3G
Criminology and Media & Communication UCAS code LP3H
Criminology and Philosophy & Ethics UCAS code LV53
Criminology and Politics UCAS code LL2H
Criminology and Psychology UCAS code LC38
Criminology and Social Policy  UCAS code ML94
Criminology and Sociology  UCAS code LL31

All course combinations result in a BA Hons degree.

Employability

As a graduate in Criminology, you will have a firm grounding for entry to a range of criminal justice and related careers.

While the police, prison and probation services are the most obvious career paths, the knowledge, awareness and experience of studying Criminology is valuable in a range of related services, as are the capacities for imaginative and critical thinking that are developed throughout the degree programme.  For example, some of our recent graduates have gone on to work in the following fields….

The police, probation service and charitable organisations, as well as a range of careers in both the public and private sector.  Furthermore a number of our students have gone on to further study at both MA and Doctoral Level.  Some graduates find that they wish to continue their studies through completion of Master’s level study, such as on our MA Criminology programme with the intention of developing further understanding of the field and additional employability skills.  Alternatively, some graduates will use their degree as a stepping stone to pursue more formal legal training with the intention of developing a career in the legal profession.

Course Contact Details

 Student Recruitment

 +44 (0) 151 291 3111

enquiry@hope.ac.uk

Department: Social Science

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